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My take on the surrender of the Syriza government can be summed up with: "Gondolin has fallen, on to the next fight". If Corbyn wins, that could be the next fight. But it won't get interesting before Corbyn survives until the elections without an intra-party Blairite coup. But by then, austerity in Greece is likely to produce some dramatic "results" than may also influence the domestic situation in Britain, one way or another.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Aug 11th, 2015 at 03:36:12 AM EST
The Greek situation is likely to have an impact on the UK referendum on EU membership as early as next year.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Aug 11th, 2015 at 04:55:43 AM EST
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Is there any evidence for this from the polls?
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Aug 11th, 2015 at 05:02:07 AM EST
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Just anecdotal evidence of despairing pro-EU brits.

Just look at the following recent piece by an FT editorial writer: Democracy at the heart of fight for Greece (Martin Sandbu, August 9, 2015)

The biggest question raised by Syriza's election victory last January was not about Greece. It was whether any national population that has adopted the euro can meaningfully express a democratic choice.

This is a test case of the euro itself. If monetary union and democracy are incompatible, even the euro's most committed friends need to choose the latter. Fortunately, they are not incompatible. But European policy is premised on the opposite view. Without a change in approach, it must lead to failure

...

It is the expression of this particular preference -- keep the euro, but with different policies -- that the eurozone political elite has done everything it can to prevent. Is this justified? There are three interpretations: one disingenuous; one charitable; and one cynical. All are deeply troubling for any democrat.



A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Aug 11th, 2015 at 05:35:21 AM EST
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Yes, and we could get the paradox situation where disillusioned hard-left voters give a victory to Eurosceptic Tories which in turn reinforces their government's position to continue with the domestic austerity drive.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Aug 11th, 2015 at 05:29:08 AM EST
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"Gondolin has fallen, on to the next fight".

Fleeing to the mouths of Sirion and hoping for the arrival of the Valar?

by IM on Tue Aug 11th, 2015 at 05:29:37 AM EST
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I doubt, despite the huffing and puffing, that Corbyn will face an outright mutiny. Several prominent Blairites will refuse to serve in his cabinet, but I doubt that any, with the exception of Yvette Cooper, will be missed.

Any who do stand up and make trouble may face issues with their constituency parties (most of which back Corbyn). Just as the rules of the election, with the ability of anybody to pay £3 and vote, were set by the Blairites believing it was a way to protect themselves from the left, the rules that allow constituency associations to de-select MPs were created by the right wing of the party. And now it may come back to bite them.

Of course, I could well be wrong. The fury of the Establishment is intense. It's not that they think Corbyn is unelectable, although most of them do, the thing they fear most is that they're wrong and that he is. Like Blair, the elites would rather vote Tory than vote for somebody who would disrupt their gravy trains.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Aug 13th, 2015 at 04:23:56 PM EST
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Corbyn has never aspired toe leadership, I doubt he has the management skills to run a group of people who agree with him. the idea of running a group of rivals will appall him.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Aug 13th, 2015 at 04:31:20 PM EST
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Corby has indicated that he is in favour of the EU, but tbh, I don't think its an issue that he's given much attention to.

I think his instincts are for building bridges internationally, but his positions may alter as he looks at the reality of the situation. It's the Rumsfeldt thing, you cast your vote for the institution you have, not the one you'd want.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Aug 13th, 2015 at 04:29:49 PM EST
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