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Charlie Hebdo is troubled by the veil?  Sounds to me like the very definition of islamophobia

um hello? You are perhaps unaware of Charlie's historic opposition to burqas?

That editorial irritates the hell out of me, because
a) Nobody is forcing Riss to by pig-free sandwiches, and
b) the idea that there is a continuum between debating Tariq Ramadan and suicide bombing is ridiculous and offensive.

However, the thesis that it is islamophobic to be troubled by a woman's burqa is an attempt at political censorship. Because wearing a burqa in public in a secular society is a political act, and a legitimate subject of political debate.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Apr 4th, 2016 at 12:55:17 PM EST
Not wearing a burqa is equally a political act by that logic. And by CH's logic not wearing a burqa is directly connected with islamophobic murder.
by Katrin on Mon Apr 4th, 2016 at 01:06:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not wearing a uniform is indeed, in a sense, a political act. It is a statement that I am an individual, making individual choices about how I present myself to others, and by extension, how I interact with others.

By wearing a uniform, I am making the statement that I have delegated my appearance to some other authority. When that uniform is designed to cut me off from all but the most perfunctory of human interactions, it is explicitly an act of submission, the very antithesis of self-determination.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Apr 5th, 2016 at 02:25:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the thesis that it is islamophobic to be troubled by a woman's burqa is an attempt at political censorship.

That is your personal interpretation the thesis.  As was my own claim about Charlie Hebdo's islamophobia: If someone says they are "troubled by the a woman's wearing of the (Islamic) veil", then to me that sounds like they are somehow afraid / fearful of that veil, as a symbol, or the wearing of it as an act.  Thus, it strikes me as an example of islamophobie in the literal sense -- "fear of islam", where fear is an actual emotion experienced by the perceiver -- and perhaps also of religiophobie in the more general sense.

Because wearing a burqa in public in a secular society is a political act

Again, that is your personal interpretation.  And very context-dependent, isn't it?

If Charlie Hebdo is being serious (un-ironic) with that editorial, then what I say to them is:  "If you are so afraid of the veil and Islam, etc., that is your own problem.  Don't limit the choices of others to make youself feel more comfortable."

and a legitimate subject of political debate

Of course!  Just because what someone says is islamophobic doesn't mean the putative cause or object of their islamophobia cannot be legitimately debated.

Point n'est besoin d'espérer pour entreprendre, ni de réussir pour persévérer. - Charles le Téméraire

by marco on Wed Apr 6th, 2016 at 01:30:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What worries me is to see that not only Charlie Hebdo, but you yourself travelled down the way from attacking the burqua to defend its wearers (from opressive male chauvinist co-religionists and family members) to attacking the women themselves.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Apr 17th, 2016 at 04:01:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Excuse me? Can you point me to where I'm attacking the women? I'm quite serious.

Is it an attack to say that wearing a burqa in a secular society is a political act? It's true that it assigns agency to the women, rather than considering them as political placards brandished by their men. The degree of agency is an interesting question, of course.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Apr 20th, 2016 at 02:27:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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