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by Bjinse on Tue Aug 1st, 2017 at 07:25:09 PM EST
Warring factions are splitting Bitcoin in 2 - Mashable


 The wild world of Bitcoin is about to get a whole lot wilder.

On August 1, 2017, the preeminent cryptocurrency is set to break in two. Two warring factions, fundamentally divided on Bitcoin's future, are coming to a head -- and the impending split could either save Bitcoin or doom it.

The split, called a hard fork, will result in two separate and distinct cryptocurrencies: Bitcoin Cash and Bitcoin. Oh, and it also has the potential to create billions of dollars worth of new cryptocurrency out of thin air.

But that's not what this is really about. Bitcoin as it currently stands is in trouble, and with so much money on the line opposing parties have naturally come forward with plans to save it. And, surprise, they all don't agree on the solution.

by Bjinse on Tue Aug 1st, 2017 at 07:40:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
is the foil for law and order and a reliable protagonist in social media pulp fiction.
Legality of bitcoin by country or territory

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Aug 2nd, 2017 at 11:38:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
seems to me that the problem is less about bitcoin and more about the trackability of electronic money. It is becoming increasingly difficult to move even modest sums around as cash in the UK.

Any payment into a bank account fof £5k and more instantly gets signalled to the police as a potential for drug trafficking. You actually have to prove your innocence, as I once did when I was signing on to the DWP.

It also explains the popularity of Fixed Odds Betting Terminals (FOBT) in betting shops around the UK, which are the best money laundering scams for small time drug dealers going. They regularise the dark economy and allow the Treasury to keep tabs on what's happening. their role in keeping the impoverished down is just colatteral damage.

So bitcoin becomes popular because cash is treated as suspect by the authorities. Which creates more problems than the clampdown on cash was supposed to solve. Authoritarianism is always the problem.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Aug 3rd, 2017 at 02:21:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A must read if you are interested in the history of misogyny in Ireland.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Aug 2nd, 2017 at 08:57:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What is his name and to where did he escape?
The answers is: Tenets of patriarchy form the foundational story of misogyny wherever "civilization" has thrived.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Aug 2nd, 2017 at 11:31:47 AM EST
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Misogyny thrived long before that oaf got drunk and will continue to thrive long after we're all dead. Because it is in the interests of the powerful that the status quo remain unchanged.

So long as we can point fingers at Saudi Arabia and say we're better than they are, what has anyone got to worry about, eh?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Aug 3rd, 2017 at 02:34:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Arkansas often says "Thank God for Mississippi" for the very same reason. It seems all important not to be the very bottom rung.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Aug 8th, 2017 at 12:36:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bus seats mistaken for burqas by members of anti-immigrant group
A Norwegian anti-immigrant group has been roundly ridiculed after members apparently mistook a photograph of six empty Oslo bus seats posted on its Facebook page for a group of women wearing burqas.

"Tragic", "terrifying" and "disgusting" were among the comments posted by members of the closed Fedrelandet viktigst, or "Fatherland first", group beneath the photograph, according to screenshots on the Norwegian news website Nettavisen.

Other members of the 13,000-strong group, for people "who love Norway and appreciate what our ancestors fought for", wondered whether the non-existent passengers might be carrying bombs or weapons beneath their clothes. "This looks really scary," wrote one. "Should be banned. You can't tell who's underneath. Could be terrorists."

by Bernard (bernard) on Wed Aug 2nd, 2017 at 07:59:22 PM EST
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We love norway and everything our ancestors fought for; they fought for the right to stand at the back of the bus and seats must be banned forever.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Aug 3rd, 2017 at 02:36:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Didn't their ancestors mainly fight the Swedes?
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Aug 3rd, 2017 at 03:22:29 PM EST
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