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There's 120 days until March 29, 2019 and ...

Second Brexit referendum could be held in 22 weeks -- Greening

Let's see:  22 x 7 = 154

So it will be possible, according to pro-European Conservative MP Justine Greening, to have a Brexit referendum 34 days after the UK has left the EU.

Does anyone in the Tory Party have a functioning brain?


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Fri Nov 30th, 2018 at 05:29:30 AM EST
Maybe the math works out better in imperial measurements?
by generic on Fri Nov 30th, 2018 at 07:42:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A50 extension. Don't be obtuse, there's enough of that going around.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Nov 30th, 2018 at 10:22:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It is my understanding the transition period is part of the Brexit Agreement that is unlikely to be accepted by parliament.

See:  here.

The agreement outlines a transitional period that will last from March 30, 2019 until 31 December 2020.



She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Fri Nov 30th, 2018 at 04:49:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Go and read Article 50. Extension to two year period by agreement on Council if requested by UK.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2018 at 06:40:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This.

... a transition cannot be delivered by the European Union (Withdrawal) Act, which was passed just over a month ago. That Act operates on the assumption that the UK will leave the EU on exit day. It chooses that day as the `switch-over' point, after which the European Communities Act 1972 (ECA) is repealed and most (but not all) EU law is converted into domestic law (or 'retained EU law').

If exit day is to stay at 29 March 2019, but the UK is to give effect to EU law `proper' (rather than `retained' EU law) beyond that day, fresh legislation is needed. A new Act of Parliament will have to amend the Withdrawal Act before the new scheme of `retained EU law' replaces the ECA.

and

The EU Treaties would cease to apply to the UK two years after the notification of an intention to withdraw [i.e. March 29, 2019] and the ECA is repealed at the same time. There can be no `transition period' without a withdrawal agreement.

Emphasis added

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sat Dec 1st, 2018 at 07:25:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I presume the distinction between "retained" and "proper" EU law is that "retained" law is whatever the law was at the time of retention, and "proper" EU law is dynamic, it can be changed by the appropriate EU institutions using prescribed processes at any time. For the moment the distinction is academic, but some divergence could occur over time during a transition period or while the UK remains associated with the CUSM if a deal is agreed. The fact that the UK could remain subject to aspects of EU law while having no formal say in its adoption is one of the most controversial aspects of the deal in the UK, even though it is only "common sense" from an EU perspective. (You want to be part of our market, you play by our rules...)

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2018 at 12:24:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is there some legal requirement I am not aware of that prevents the holding of a second referendum before the end of March? I appreciate there are some parliamentary procedures to be gone through, but the campaign itself need not be any longer than your average G.E. campaign, i.e. 3/4 weeks. It's not as if the issues haven't been discussed to death over the past 3 years. It seems to me the UK should avoid asking for an A.50 extension if possible, as a refusal might offend...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Nov 30th, 2018 at 05:01:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The EU has several times expressed its wish to see the UK remain. A very recent statement from the EU says there are only three ways forward: the May agreement, no deal, or no Brexit.

Why would there be a refusal to accommodate a British move towards a likely Remain outcome?

I used to be afew. I'm still not many.

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Sat Dec 1st, 2018 at 03:58:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think there would be, but at the same time an A.50 extension requires unanimous agreement on the Council so it just takes one member with a grudge...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sat Dec 1st, 2018 at 05:07:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And as I pointed out a few weeks ago, over the past two years, the Tories have managed to offend quite a number of people in many EU27 countries, including countries traditionally sympathetic to the UK positions; it turns out that many people in Europe can read and understand English, actually (I know: shocking).

Would that be enough to push some to block to block A50 extension (cough - Gibraltar - cough)? Probably not, but it's hard to predict.

by Bernard on Sat Dec 1st, 2018 at 05:36:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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