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Absolutely not.

Those monologues are attributed either to A. Hamilton or J. Madison. The subject of these articles is in the main distribution and self-regulation of powers within a republican government (to replace the Articles of Confederacy) and, parenthetically, some interest in restricting that body's abuse of constituents. Neither were particularly metaphysical, in the manner of French philosophes, but eminently utilitarian. "Virtue" is not in their lexicon.

The former advocated for formal central government. The latter advocated for laissez faire central government, arising form perpetual, factional conflict.

Behold

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sun Jan 6th, 2019 at 12:54:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The US Constitution and the Federalist Papers (that were written for swaying New York to ratify) constitute unprecedented pieces of practical political philosophy.

Federalist No. 55

as Madison said in the Federalist Paper, "Were the pictures which have been drawn by the political jealousy of some among us faithful likenesses of the human character, the inference would be, that there is not sufficient virtue among men for self-government; and that nothing less than the chains of despotism can restrain them from destroying and devouring one another"[4] meaning, the Republican government depends on the virtue/trust of the people. "Republican government presupposes the existence of these qualities in a higher degree than any other form [of government]."[4]
In the papers #10, #63, Madison discusses the concern of longevity of Republics, noting "puritanical" ones as the most stable. The common understanding was apparently that checks, balances, whatever mechanics of government would (strictly speaking) never guarantee prolonged functioning without such things as civic virtue.
by das monde on Sun Jan 6th, 2019 at 08:07:10 PM EST
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I linked to the texts, not wikiwtf. Hamilton, Jay, and Madison focused regional interests of wealthy property owners that were diametrically opposed to central government for reasons as obvious at the time as they are now.

Though this correspondence was initially published in NY newspapers as was convenient for two of the principal authors --extremely prominent convention delegates-- they were reprinted in every state debating ratification. That is to say, their arguments were not published exclusively for NY's assembly.

Ratification was not a foregone conclusion. Able, articulate men used newspapers, pamphlets, and public meetings to debate ratification of the Constitution. Those known as Antifederalists opposed the Constitution for a variety of reasons. Some continued to argue that the delegates in Philadelphia had exceeded their congressional authority by replacing the Articles of Confederation with an illegal new document. Others complained ...
NY was neither the first nor the last to ratify in the period of publication.

I believe, I have cautioned readers about Libertarian Speed Reading Methods, but I might not have commented on the tendency likewise to attenuate literal scope of the matter to frequency of a word's occurrence.

Here is No. 55 in its entirety. "Virtue" here merely represents proposed term limits, opposed to abject corruption in the House of Representative, especially.

Is the danger apprehended from the other branches of the federal government? But where are the means to be found by the President, or the Senate, or both? Their emoluments of office, it is to be presumed, will not, and without a previous corruption of the House of Representatives cannot, more than suffice for very different purposes; their private fortunes, as they must all be American citizens, cannot possibly be sources of danger. The only means, then, which they can possess, will be in the dispensation of appointments. Is it here that suspicion rests her charge? Sometimes we are told that this fund of corruption is to be exhausted by the President in subduing the virtue of the Senate.
[...]
As there is a degree of depravity in mankind which requires a certain degree of circumspection and distrust, so there are other qualities in human nature which justify a certain portion of esteem and confidence. Republican government presupposes the existence of these qualities in a higher degree than any other form. Were the pictures which have been drawn by the political jealousy of some among us faithful likenesses of the human character, the inference would be, that there is not sufficient virtue among men for self-government; and that nothing less than the chains of despotism can restrain them from destroying and devouring one another.
Meaning, none of them had confidence in "civic virtue".


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Jan 10th, 2019 at 06:43:12 AM EST
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