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Not more ridiculous than the French 2-round FPTP system, where a bit over 32% of the vote in the first round resulted into an absolute majority of seats (350 out of 577) for Macron and his La République en Marche (LREM) party.
by Bernard on Tue Jul 9th, 2019 at 08:21:08 AM EST
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Most countries with PR systems have mechanisms to favour larger parties somewhat, allegedly to discourage a splintering of parties and make it somewhat easier to forge a governing coalition.

Those mechanisms can include excluding parties which don't achieve a minimum threshold of the vote - 3% in the case of Greece, to having top two run-offs in a second round of voting. In Ireland's case the average size of a constituency is 4 seats, which requires a 20% of the vote +1 quota in any one constituency to be sure of getting a seat.

However the single transferable vote mechanism means that often parties with say, 10% of the first preference votes, can gain the last seat if they can edge up towards the 20% mark by gaining transfers from smaller parties and candidates as they are eliminated. Thus at the last election there were a plethora of smaller parties and independents gaining seats in particular constituencies. Nevertheless Fine Gael, the largest party, got 32% of the seats with 25% of the first preference vote.

Giving a bonus of 50 seats to the largest party, as in the case of Greece, seems a bit extreme, however, specially if there isn't much of a difference in size between the two largest parties.

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by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Jul 10th, 2019 at 12:40:14 AM EST
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