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An Irish perspective on Dutch preparations...

Bye, Bye Britain: The Dutch get ready for a Brexit party

It's undoubtedly going to be one of those "where were you?" moments. And already almost 10,000 people in the Netherlands have decided: on October 31st, irrespective of the weather, they'll be at a giant beach party, facing across the North Sea, with a band playing We'll Meet Again.

The idea of a huge European "Bye, Bye Britain" party in Wijk aan Zee, a quiet seaside village west of Amsterdam best known for its annual chess tournament, started as a bit of a joke - until suddenly it went viral on Facebook.

Now, says one of the organisers, film maker Ron Toekook, it's caught the imagination. "Because so many Dutch people live in apartments, there's a tradition here: you take your deck chair and a bottle of wine and go to the beach to watch the sun setting. Everyone does it. We love it."

The plan is for plenty of European food and drink - French wine, German beer, Dutch cheese, Belgian fries, Italian pasta, even Austrian strudel - to remind the Brits what they're giving up, all to be consumed against a soundscape of nostalgic tunes from the previous Battle of Britain.



Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Sep 1st, 2019 at 08:09:28 PM EST
I hope they also plan to eat lot of Irish Beef. Over 50% of our production goes to the UK, and won't be able to compete after Sterling devaluation and steep tariffs

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Sep 1st, 2019 at 08:19:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Market Irish Beef as grass fed and export it to the USA at a premium. Irish butter has led the way. And the EU already has an agreement with the USA in place.


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Sep 1st, 2019 at 09:42:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As an American, I love the Kerry Gold imports! They are so much more flavorful than US factory farm products and I trust Irish imports much more than Chinese food imports.
I don't understand the grass fed craze. Grass fed beef is tough and stringy compared with well-marbled corn fed beef which is getting hard to find. We mostly eat chicken now because of the outrageous prices for tough flavorless beef.
And Guiness forever!

NOTE: My family is from Southern Europe, no identified Irish genes. My wife, however, has 10% Irish genes despite no identified Irish ancestors for 170 years. Apparently they came from her Norwegian ancestry as I read on line that Norwegians are genetically very Irish due to large numbers of captives brought back to Norway by the Vikings a thousand years ago,

by StillInTheWilderness on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 03:06:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Beef needs to be fattened with grain to properly finish. In the USA this is typically done with corn. Corn has some problems. IMO, oats would be a much more suitable grain to use for fattening.


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 05:31:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Except that processors have been using Roundup as drying aget and all oats have a detectable residue.
I'm not an organic fan, but eating weedkiller is a bridge too far.
BTW, due to the stress of family death andmedical emergency, I have neglected my garden this year, not even putting out the red sticky spheres to trap insects. I'm eating organic apples from the yard. After cutting around the worm holes, they are quite tasty. All varieties are two weeks early. Pears are two weeks early too. I think it's the hot summer we had. No peaches which are usually reliable. Must have been that minus 40 wind chill record that killed all the buds. The three trees have a big canopy now from new growth but I can walk upright under all the peach trees because all the previous years' (plural) growth died.

I think Global Warming came knocking in Illinois this year. Commercial corn farmers have extremely poor crops due to monsoon rains in Spring and Early summer. Now the Chinese don't want to buy what little corn and soybeans they have to sell.

by StillInTheWilderness on Thu Sep 5th, 2019 at 02:46:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Germany set to ban glyphosate from end of 2023
The ban, agreed by the Cabinet on Wednesday, is part of an insect conservation program from Environment Minister Svenja Schulze.

It includes a "systematic reduction strategy" which would initially prohibit use of the chemical in domestic gardens and allotments, and on the edge of farmers' fields.

Germany's move comes after lawmakers in Austria passed a bill banning all use of the weedkiller, making the country the first to do so.

BASF, Bayer-Monsanto, Dow Agrosciences "growth" hammer.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Sep 5th, 2019 at 04:24:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I often wish I lived in Germany.
by StillInTheWilderness on Thu Sep 5th, 2019 at 02:30:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Use of the 'drying agent' is a technique to ensure that all grain is mature by a date certain. There are already grains grown for beer brewing that have not had drying agents used and this approach would have to be expanded to use oats as a finishing crop. Alternatively, cattle being finished could just be turned out to pasture in unharvested oat fields - or some combination.


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Sep 5th, 2019 at 06:02:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Protein discussion likely to be on next European Commission agenda
Indeed, while the EU imports the majority of its gas and oil, it is also totally dependent on imports of animal protein. European hens, cows and pigs consume no less than 37 million tonnes of imported plant-based protein.
[...]
[Juncker's] Commission ha[d] not proposed to reduce meat consumption, as it remains a taboo subject despite being at the root of the problem. Instead, it has identified that "soya is a particular problem because the EU can only cover 5% of its need for soya." This was pointed out last year by European Commissioner for Agriculture Phil Hogan.
[...]
In three years, the area cultivated in France for soybeans has increased tenfold to reach 160,000 hectares. That represents a drop in the ocean compared to the 29 million hectares of land cultivated in France. As the head of Europe's largest biodiesel group, [Avril pres Arnaud] Rousseau is calling on farmers to feed their livestock and other farmyard animals with rapeseed meals rather than soybean meals.
[...]
France imports only 45% of its plant-based proteins while the rest of Europe imports two-thirds. If France attempts to change things, mainly because of its predominant role on the biodiesel market, covering Europe's need for animal feed (i.e.  43 million tonnes per year, including 12 million tonnes of Brazilian soya), is not technically feasible.
Focus on EU soya beans imports from the US, April 2019
U.S. is now the EU's main supplier of soya beans with a share of 52%, Sep 2018

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 05:59:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You beat me to the punch on Kerry Gold.  Irish cheeses are a definite addition.
by rifek on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 08:53:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you take your deck chair and a bottle of wine and go to the beach to watch the sun setting

Copied from Austin, TX (except for the beach). They even applaud the sun setting. I thought this was because there was nothing else to do there.

I'm sure England will also have Brexit parties. What will they eat at them?

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Sun Sep 1st, 2019 at 09:08:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Brexiteers Brexit Party Menu Options:
1. Italian Pasta, Spanish Paella, French Pate de fois gras, washed down by a Chianti or Beaujolais

Everone else: Humble pie

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Sep 1st, 2019 at 10:00:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
personally I expect to be pretty drunk.

The craft beer revolution in the UK will run into trouble pretty quickly cos a lot of breweries like using bamberg maltings for some of their flavour malts.

Also, british hops have fallen from favour in recent years. But barring a trade deal those exotic hops (US, Czech, Australian, NZ and Japanese) are going to be hard to source.

A return to good old fashioned English mild and bitter? Well, I don't mind, but not in these circumstances

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 01:59:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The USA grows hops. The Yakima Valley - Washington, Oregon and Idaho - I believe, is a major supplier.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 2nd, 2019 at 05:35:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lots of hops farms in the Lower Yakima Valley in Washington.  Perhaps that can be in the opening round of Der Drumpfenfuehrer's big bilateral trade agreement with the UK.
by rifek on Wed Sep 4th, 2019 at 09:03:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
British Investment in Netherlands Surges as Brexit Looms, 9 Sep
Last year, Dutch investment in the U.K. went negative with Netherlands-based companies pulling 11 billion euros ($12.1 billion) out of the British economy. On top of the declining Dutch investment, 98 firms have relocated from the U.K. to the Netherlands since the Brexit referendum.

"The ongoing growing uncertainty [of rubber stamp extensions] in the United Kingdom, and the increasingly clearer possibility of a no-deal, is causing major economic unrest for these companies. That is why more and more companies are orienting themselves in the Netherlands as a potential new base in the European market," said Jeroen Nijland, commissioner of the Netherlands Foreign Investment Agency.
[...]
Sigrid Kaag, the Dutch trade minister, expressed frustration at the lack of a deal.

"At a certain moment, enough is enough. At some point the certainty offered by a worsening situation is better than continuing uncertainty with no new perspective," she told the Dutch newspaper the Financieele Dagblad.

parity watch last call

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Mon Sep 9th, 2019 at 06:59:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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