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And after that they may realize that Corbyn would have been better, and blame the Jews for destroying him. (They should really blame the Tory antisemites, but this is England).
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Sep 9th, 2020 at 05:46:31 PM EST
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Virtually no one in the UK believes Corbyn would have been better.

Of course he would, but no one seems to be able to accept that.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Sep 9th, 2020 at 08:26:21 PM EST
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It is very difficult for most people to accept they have been played for a fool. They would rather double down on the con than admit their mistake. The Tories are still in the lead over Labour, and Trump has never been below 40% support in the average of polls. The trend may be downward in both cases, but it is at a slow generational pace as older people die off without ever having admitted their mistake.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed Sep 9th, 2020 at 10:14:22 PM EST
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I don't think even that explains Corbyn Derangement Syndrome. He simply wasn't seen as a credible leader, but Johnson - oh the hilarity - was.

The media had a lot to do with it, but that wasn't the entire story. Merely by existing, Corbyn somehow violated a sacred foundation of tribal Englishness.

Maybe he came over as an annoying school teacher. Maybe he was too obviously one of the metropolitan elites, troubled by an education and a conscience. Maybe he was just too middle class, and at the same time not aggressively and selfishly middle class enough. Maybe the Labour Right, as represented by the Guardian, just didn't want him to win because taxes and narcissism.

Whatever it was, many voters didn't warm to it. They preferred the lying sociopathic posho drunk who hid in a fridge over the rather boring and staid opposition leader, with his principles, his social conscience, and his optimistic plan for the future.

Ultimately it was a total collapse in the integrity of the English moral character. And so here we are.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Sep 9th, 2020 at 11:58:09 PM EST
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Speaking of Corbyn, what is the state of Labour these days? Is Starmer merely a return to Blairism? Is Momentum and the Labour Left wing active or has it collapsed in despair?
by fjallstrom on Thu Sep 10th, 2020 at 09:41:26 AM EST
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by epochepoque on Sat Sep 12th, 2020 at 02:04:27 PM EST
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From here he seems mostly bad:

Can't be seen not to be Tories:

No Deal is now just another few % in the polls for the hacks:


Purging the left:
Rebecca Long-Bailey sacking reignites Labour turmoil over antisemitism | Rebecca Long-Bailey | The Guardian
Keir Starmer is facing a showdown with the left of Labour after his decisive sacking of Rebecca Long-Bailey reignited the party's internal turmoil over the issue of antisemitism.

And throwing money away to have it in print that Corbyn was an anti-semite:
Labour to pay `substantial damages' to antisemitism whistleblowers | The Independent | The Independent
Labour has agreed to pay "substantial damages'' to seven whistleblowers over "defamatory and false allegations'' made following a BBC Panorama investigation into antisemitism.

Terminal lib brain:

I haven't seen much Momentum or Labour left activity, but that doesn't mean it isn't there, just that I'm paying much less attention.

by generic on Wed Sep 16th, 2020 at 01:25:45 PM EST
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