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Well their car industry is collapsing as a result of being so far behind the curve on EVs. Maybe Japan's century is over also.
by asdf on Tue Dec 14th, 2021 at 12:42:11 AM EST
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Not sure what "Japan's century" means to you apart from automotive industry competition, starting in the 70s, but I think we can agree, sales growth no longer depends on US market entry. Japanese brands produce as many vehicles as USA, in as many markets as USA, and leverages JV with both Euro, US, and Chinese manufacturers. Their share is wide and deep, especially in the global south.

OTOH, the US new car market has been collapsing (into the secondary market) for two decades, because of escalating MSRP (offset by manufacturers' finance ops) is beyond the reach of median HH income, where value, inventory, and preference for shitty mpg ICE vehicles converge. Moreover, average trade-in cycle ("lifespan") which ranged 4-7 years at the turn of the century is now around 12 years.

Doom of the day is strictly for American consumption

by Cat on Tue Dec 14th, 2021 at 07:49:05 PM EST
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by Cat on Tue Dec 14th, 2021 at 10:51:25 PM EST
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Well, I was thinking "Japanese century" in the sense that they modernized to the point of competitiveness with Russia early in the century, then the US midway, then globally after WW2.

As far as cars go, they currently sell a lot. But their EV situation is pretty bad. Maybe they will catch up with South Korea, China, the US, and the EU, but they had better get going.

by asdf on Sat Dec 18th, 2021 at 01:25:14 AM EST
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They kinda took the lead in EV car market with Leafs and Priuses, but mid 201os the whole nation started this "hydrogen society" -thing, and car makers followed the trend. So their focus is mostly on hydrogen cars now, an area where they, I think, clearly lead at the moment.
by pelgus on Sat Dec 18th, 2021 at 10:54:05 AM EST
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