Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
The seeds you grow will determine the harvest. The US has changed its personality through fear and intrinsic culture of violence: xenophobia and Islamophobia. A change for evil, a balance of good changing over many decades.

Blood and guts story | NY Times - May 11, 1975 |

Suzanne Massie is the daughter of a Swiss diplomat. She was born in New York and graduated from Vassar College, but also studied at the Sorbonne and the Institute of Political Studies in Paris.

Massie studied Russian and explored a culture in which suffering is accorded dignity rather than shame and ostracism; the Russian emigré community extended to them a compassion withheld by others. Together the Massies pursued the historical interest that led to the successful biography "Nicholas and Alexandra" about the parents of the Tsarevich Alexis whose hemophilia played a part in the downfall of the Romanovs. The book temporarily brought them a measure of freedom from financial pressure and the chance to live in France for four years, where Bobby discovered a matter‐of‐fact acceptance and a chance to be valued for his talents he had not found in America.



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Wed Jan 26th, 2022 at 11:31:00 AM EST
The Lady Who Warmed Up the Cold War | The Daily Beast - July 14, 2017 |

In forming his perceptions of the Soviet Union, Ronald Reagan had a friend--a well-dressed, attractive, Russian-speaking, fifty-year-old woman whose ideas about what was happening in Moscow and Leningrad made a bigger impression upon the president of the United States than the reporting and analysis of the Central Intelligence Agency. Her name was Suzanne Massie. She was a writer and author, not an established Soviet scholar. She first met the president on January 17, 1984, when National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane brought her into the Oval Office to give Reagan a report on a recent visit to the Soviet Union. They hit it off immediately.

The setting was hardly intimate. Reagan was flanked by several other senior officials, including McFarlane, Vice President George Bush and Reagan's three top White House aides, Michael Deaver, James Baker and Edwin Meese. Nevertheless, as Massie proceeded to describe the mood in Moscow, she focused directly on the president as though he were the only person in the room. Whatever she did worked. Reagan was by nature so remote and impersonal that even distinguished visitors sometimes left wondering if he knew their names--and yet on this occasion, Reagan forged some sort of bond with Massie.



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Wed Jan 26th, 2022 at 11:31:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reagan's Evolving Views of Russians and their Relevance Today | Wilson Center - Dec. 1, 2008 |

After 18 meetings, just before his meeting with Gorbachev in Reykjavik, Iceland, she once asked him "What do you want from the Russians, anyway?" Without hesitation Reagan answered firmly "I want to get rid of those atomic weapons, every one." This was the point at which Massie taught Reagan the famous Russian proverb "Doveryai no proveryai" that translates as "trust, but verify," a phrase that he subsequently used on numerous occasions.

In concluding her talk, Massie demonstrated Reagan's relevance today for U.S. policy toward Russia and gave some words of advice to current policymakers. First, Massie said, Reagan respected Gorbachev and treated him as an equal. Gorbachev appreciated this, and for the first time Reagan was able to create an atmosphere of trust between a U.S. president and a leader of the Soviet Union. Respect is of greatest importance to Russians today and can help to foster trust, if not always agreement. President Medvedev recently addressed this important issue, saying in his remarks at the Foreign Policy Association that "today there is no trust between the United States and Russia."

Kremlin confirms Reagan's ex-adviser Suzanne Massie granted Russian citizenship | Tass - Dec. 30, 2021 |

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Wed Jan 26th, 2022 at 11:32:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series