Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
Today -100: Of the unity of imperial foreign policy, rebellions, and ratifications
Because British Secretary of State for India Edwin Montagu allowed the publication of that call by the Government of India for revision of the Treaty of Sèvres, he has been forced out. Something about collective cabinet responsibility.
[NY Yella Cake print, fit to] Mr. Montagu in his communication to the Premier [Lloyd Georg] says that "after our conversation this morning" he felt it his duty to resign. He explains that when he recived on Saturday an urgent request from the Indian Government for permission to publish its telegram containing its views on Turkish peace, he felt it his duty to accept the responsibility by sanctioning publication. He did not the expect that an early meeting of the Cabinet would be held and did not see in the Indian Government's communication much if anything which had not been said by that Goverment and on its behalf again and again ever since the peace conference.
"I did not conceive it possible," he says, "that there should be anyquestion that they would not be allowed to state their views upon a question which so vitally affected the peace of India, nor did I think that it was possible or right to prevent them informing the people whom they governed of the views they felt it their duty to put forward on their behalf.
[...]
Rebuked by Lloyd George.
Lloyd George in his reply regrets it is necessary for him to advise the King to accept Mr. Montagu's resignation.
[...]
After declaring that the British Government has afforded the Indian Mohhammedans ever possible opportunity of urgint their views, the Premier proceeds: "If the Governments of the Empire wer all to claim the liberty of publishing individual declarations on matters which vitally affect the relations of the whole Empire with foreign powers the unity of our foreign policy would be broken at once and the very existence of the Empire jeopardized."
He says he never considered suppressing the Indians' views or preventing them informing the Indian people of the views the government puts forward in their name. Lloyd George, on the other hand, insists that the unity of the Empire's foreign policy can only be maintained by the various colonies shutting the fuck up.
Peace Treaty of Sèvres, 10 August, 1920 (never adopted, superseded by the Treaty of Lausanne)
Section I, Articles 1 - 260
THE BRITISH EMPIRE, FRANCE, ITALY AND JAPAN,
These Powers being described in the present Treaty as the Principal Allied Powers;
ARMENIA, BELGIUM, GREECE, THE HEDJAZ, POLAND, PORTUGAL, ROUMANIA, THE SERB-CROAT-SLOVENE STATE AND CZECHO-SLOVAKIA, These Powers constituting, with the Principal Powers mentioned above, the Allied Powers, of the one part;
AND TURKEY, of the other part;
Section II, Annex II, and Articles 261 - 433
ANNEX I: THE OTTOMAN PRE-WAR PUBLIC DEBT. (NOVEMBER 5, 1914)
PART IX. ECONOMIC CLAUSES.
SECTION I. COMMERCIAL RELATIONS.
SECTION II. TREATIES.
SECTION III. INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY.
SECTION IV. PROPERTY, RIGHTS AND INTERESTS.
SECTION V. CONTRACTS, PRESCRIPTIONS, JUDGMENTS.
ANNEX [... details, details, details ...]
by Cat on Thu Mar 10th, 2022 at 04:51:44 PM EST

Others have rated this comment as follows:

Oui 4

Display:

Top Diaries

Occasional Series