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The United States Extends Its Military Reach Into Zambia, 1 July AFRICOM
On April 26, 2022, the United States Africa Command (AFRICOM) announced that they had set up an office in the U.S. Embassy in Lusaka, Zambia. According to AFRICOM Brigadier General Peter Bailey, Deputy Director for Strategy, Engagement and Programs, the Office of Security Cooperation would be based in the U.S. Embassy building. Social media in Zambia buzzed with rumors about the creation of a U.S. military base in the country. Defense Minister Ambrose Lufuma released a statement[3 May] to say that "Zambia has no intention whatsoever of establishing or hosting any military bases on Zambian soil." "Over our dead bodies" will the United States have a military base in Zambia, said Dr. Fred M'membe, the president of the Socialist Party of Zambia.
That can be arranged. Patrice Lumumba's tooth
Brigadier General Bailey of AFRICOM had met with Zambia's President Hakainde Hichilema during his visit to Lusaka. Hichilema's government faces serious economic challenges despite the fact that Zambia has one of the richest resources of raw materials in the world. When Zambia's total public debt grew to nearly $27 billion (with an external debt of approximately $14.5 billion), it returned to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in December 2021 for financial assistance, resulting in an IMF-induced spiral of debt.

Two months after Hichilema met with the AFRICOM team, he hosted IMF Deputy Managing Director Antoinette M. Sayeh in June, who thanked President Hichilema for his commitment to the IMF "reform plans." These plans include a general austerity package ["structural adjustment programming"] that will not only cause the Zambian population to be in the grip of poverty but will also prevent the Zambian government from exercising its sovereignty.
[...]
The real intentions, M'membe told me, are for the United States to use Zambia's location "to monitor, to control, and to quickly reach the other countries in the region." Zambia and its neighbor, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, he said, "possess not less than 70 percent of the world's cobalt reserves. There are huge copper reserves and other minerals needed for modern technologies [in both these countries]." Partly, M'membe said, "this is what has heightened interest in Zambia." Zambia is operating as a "puppet regime," M'membe said, a government that is de jure independent but de facto "completely dependent on an outside power and subject to its orders," M'membe added, while referring to the U.S. interference in the functioning of the Zambian government. Despite his campaign promises in 2021, President Hichilema has followed the same IMF-dependent policies as his unpopular predecessor Edgar Lungu.
[...]
Zambia's Defense Minister Lufuma [now] argues that the "office" set up in Lusaka is to assist the Zambian forces in the United Nations Multidimensional Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA). Since 2014, the United States has provided around 136 million kwacha ($8 million) to assist the Zambian military. Lufuma said that this office will merely continue that work. In fact, Zambia is not even one of the top five troop contributing countries to MINUSCA (these include Bangladesh, Cameroon, Egypt, Pakistan and Rwanda).

Neither Zambia nor the United States military has made public the agreement signed in April. ...

archived World Bank: "the resource-rich countries that host these strategic minerals"
by Cat on Fri Jul 1st, 2022 at 05:02:56 PM EST
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