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The Problem of Foreign Mercenaries in Libya: the Front for Change and Concord in Chad (FACT)

After many years of conflict in Libya, the 5 + 5 Joint Military Commission, which was formed by the representatives of the warring factions, agreed on the ceasefire agreement and the agreement was signed on 23 October 2020. Withdrawing of foreign mercenaries from Libya within the scope of this permanent ceasefire has undoubtedly become one of the most prominent topics. After the three months given by the committee, both the Sirte-Jufra line, where the Russian Wagner company is active and the movements in the regions under the control of Khalifa Haftar, the leader of the militia groups in the east of Libya, showed that these actors were unwilling to eliminate  mercenaries from Libya.

  • From the diaries - Last Obama Stronghold In Libya About to Fall
  • Khalifa Hifter was once a top military officer for Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, but after a disastrous military adventure in Chad in the late 1980s, Hifter [also spelled Haftar, Hefter] switched to the anti-Gadhafi opposition. In the early 1990s, he moved to suburban Virginia, where he established a life but maintained ties to anti-Gadhafi groups.

However, after the United Arab Emirates (UAE), which is the financier of foreign militia groups, announced that it withdrew its financial support from these groups in March, it was announced that up to 5,000 Chad and Sudanese militias were preparing to get withdrawn from Libya.

The fact that the border control in Libya has not been fully established and the illegal border crossings that create serious security problems, especially in the Chad-Niger border, seem to be a red signal  about the threats that these irregular and uncontrolled militia groups, which are deemed to be separatist in their own countries.

The Unravelling: In a failing state, an anti-Islamist general mounts a divisive campaign | The New Yorker - Feb. 16, 2015 |

Early last year, General Khalifa Haftar left his home in northern Virginia--where he had spent most of the previous two decades, at least some of that time working with the Central Intelligence Agency--and returned to Tripoli to fight his latest war for control of Libya.

'Sapere aude'

by Oui (Oui) on Mon Aug 7th, 2023 at 09:41:29 AM EST
Chad Covert Coup and Saharan Insecurity New details have emerged surrounding US federal lawsuits filed in the State of Virginia and Washington against Libyan militia leader Khalifa Haftar by families of alleged victims of torture and extrajudicial killings



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Mon Aug 7th, 2023 at 09:42:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The killing of Idriss Déby reveals a tangled geopolitical web that is likely to deepen internal divisions in Chad | TRT World |

General Idriss Déby, 68, who misruled Chad for 31-years, died after sustaining injuries in clashes between FACT rebels and his troops over the weekend, the country's military announced. A state funeral is due to take place this week.

Will his death lead to peace in this oil-producing nation of 15 million? Or will it lead to more chaos and crises, making a bad situation worse?

Will FACT leader Mahamat Mahdi Ali translate Déby's death, which is a game changer, into real political currency and overrun the Chadian capital N'Djamena, where Déby's replacement, a 37-year-old four-star general, who is none other than Déby's own son, let's call him "Déby Le Fils" is regrouping the army for face off?

The internal and geopolitical context of Deby's death is not particularly promising.



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Mon Aug 7th, 2023 at 09:44:37 AM EST
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Chad's `covert coup' and the implications for democratic governance in Africa | The Conversation - May 4, 2021 |

The recent spate of military coups in Africa, which were intended to be transitional, might instead be a risk for democracy in the long term. There might be a short term need to maintain security. But the military may not necessarily be a credible partner to build democratic governance. Military intervention could mean that people might continue to be in a state of stagnant democracy.

Chad is the most recent example of this. Soon after the death of President Idriss Déby, the military swiftly took over power. They immediately installed his 37-year-old son Mahamat, a military commander, as interim president. He will now lead an 18-month Transitional Military Council. Parliament and the government have been dissolved and the constitution suspended.



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Mon Aug 7th, 2023 at 09:45:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Mopping up operation by US Special Forces after the disaster intervention in Libya creating instability #Benghazi raid and stupidity of Hillary Rodham Clinton in 2011. Sending munitions, arms and jihadists to Turkey to fight another proxy war in Syria to remove president Bashir Al-Assad. Braking glass, but no ceilings. Be damned.



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Mon Aug 7th, 2023 at 01:40:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The US can't use its $110 million drone base in Niger

Known as "Nigerien Air Base 201," the installation cost $110 million to build and it features a 6,200-foot runway for MQ-9 Reapers as well as manned aircraft. The U.S. military began conducting drone flights from the base in November 2019.

About 1,100 U.S. troops are currently deployed to Niger, according to the Defense Department. The country is an important partner in the U.S. military's efforts to counter the Islamic State group and other terrorist organizations in Africa. In October 2017, four U.S. soldiers were killed near the Nigerien village of Tongo Tongo after being attacked by more than 100 ISIS fighters.

Politico first reported that U.S. military drones were unable to fly from a base near Agadez, Niger, after the country's armed forces ousted Niger's president in a July 26 coup.

It is too early to determine how the closure of Niger's airspace will affect U.S. military operations in Africa, a second U.S. official told Task & Purpose.

In the short term, not being able to use of Nigerien Air Base 201 will limit the U.S. military's visibility over the Sahel region of Africa where ISIS [???] and al-Qaida's branch in West Africa known as Jama'at Nusrat al-Islam wal-Muslimin, or JNIM, both have a strong presence in Africa and the Middle East.



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Mon Aug 7th, 2023 at 01:42:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From a progressive American Thinker in March 2011 ..

Libya is Not Our Problem | By BooMan23 - Mar 13, 2011 |

If Anthony Shadid's reporting on Libya for the U.S. media is accurate, my prediction has come true. The United States of America will get blamed for everything no matter what we do. And I find it very irritating.

We have absolutely no responsibility for the fact that Gaddafi has been running Libya for over forty years. We didn't tell people to revolt against his leadership. We do not have close relationships with the Libyan elite. We do not coddle them, empower them, or apologize for them. We have only the most tangential interests in what happens in Libya, and our main concern is that chaos there not lead to energy inflation that slows the world economy and cost us jobs.

Moreover, one of the most common Arab complaints about the USA is that we intervene in their internal affairs. So, when we don't go racing to aid a hodgepodge of ill-trained, ill-led, poorly educated rebels, suddenly we're the bad guys? I don't like Gaddafi, but reading the rebels' complaints almost makes me want to start rooting for him.

Shadid details just how disorganized the rebellion is, and it doesn't inspire any confidence on my part that we should have anything to do with them, even if we share a common loathing for Gaddafi.



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Mon Aug 7th, 2023 at 01:43:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From a progressive American Thinker in March 2011 ..

Libya is Not Our Problem | By BooMan23 - Mar 13, 2011 |

If Anthony Shadid's reporting on Libya for the U.S. media is accurate, my prediction has come true. The United States of America will get blamed for everything no matter what we do. And I find it very irritating.

We have absolutely no responsibility for the fact that Gaddafi has been running Libya for over forty years. We didn't tell people to revolt against his leadership. We do not have close relationships with the Libyan elite. We do not coddle them, empower them, or apologize for them. We have only the most tangential interests in what happens in Libya, and our main concern is that chaos there not lead to energy inflation that slows the world economy and cost us jobs.

Moreover, one of the most common Arab complaints about the USA is that we intervene in their internal affairs. So, when we don't go racing to aid a hodgepodge of ill-trained, ill-led, poorly educated rebels, suddenly we're the bad guys? I don't like Gaddafi, but reading the rebels' complaints almost makes me want to start rooting for him.

Shadid details just how disorganized the rebellion is, and it doesn't inspire any confidence on my part that we should have anything to do with them, even if we share a common loathing for Gaddafi.



'Sapere aude'
by Oui (Oui) on Mon Aug 7th, 2023 at 03:48:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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