Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

What's your highest level of education?

Less than Secondary (ie less than high school, etc)   0 votes - 0 %
Secondary degree   5 votes - 7 %
Current University Undergraduate student.   1 vote - 1 %
Undergraduate degree.   18 votes - 26 %
Current Masters student.   2 votes - 2 %
Masters Degree   17 votes - 25 %
Current PhD student   8 votes - 11 %
PhD   11 votes - 16 %
Professional Student (Doctor, Lawyer, etc)   0 votes - 0 %
Professional Degree (Law, Medicine, etc)   5 votes - 7 %
 
67 Total Votes
Display:
I did my undergraduate degree with a major in Political Science, minors in economics, European Studies, and Asian Studies at Ball State University in Muncie, IN. Studied law, economics, and history at the Universidad Publica de Navarra in Pamplona, Spain.

Starting the second year of my masters in political science in a few weeks.  Comparative politics major, international relations minor.  Particularly interested in political economy, and labor relations.

Trying to decide on the PhD.  Thinking about the comparative politics of work for the diss.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 12:19:22 PM EST
I'm a great advocate of life long learning. Learning for the sake of learning and personal development rather than to be entirely career focussed without rounding it out with other skills.

I happen to be a fairly academic type so doing degrees and professional study suits me but I strongly support better provision for vocational qualifications and for general skills training. I don't believe that anyone should be stigmatised for choosing not to follow an academic or 'professional' path.

Good luck with your current studies!

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 12:44:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes.

There are times I wish I had gone into skilled trades (carpentry) like my father, but I'm sure if I had, I'd think the other way around. Whatever makes you happy. I like the physical exercise with that type of work.

Look at the poll, I can't say I'm suprised, but wow.  Where else can you go where a third of the people are PhD students?

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 12:59:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Look at the poll, I can't say I'm suprised, but wow.  Where else can you go where a third of the people are PhD students?

And then people wonder why there's a reluctance to post diaries ? Scrutiny by this lot can be a scary experience. It's why I mostly post crap diaries about trivial subjects nobody knows about.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 02:34:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, at the moment there are 22 votes and only one PhD.

And PhDs should count themselves lucky if they could write your diaries.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 03:40:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's true, Helen writes very good diaries and plenty of very excellent comments on threads and other diaries.

I'm trying to think back on my own diaries but I don't think I have ever written anything related to my PhD except indirectly for one on communicating science.

I don't think that possession of PhDs here is really all that in itself, but people's expertise in various areas developed through their careers or hobbies or through being a sodding polymath is what I feel I can't keep up with.

I do think most people would appreciate that where others aren't necessarily on par in terms of depth of expertise, it doesn't mean that they can't make a valuable layman's contribution to a discussion.  On occasion though some comments or debate back on a point comes in a bit too hard and that can be intimidating when you don't have detail of terminology or expertise to articulate your point very well.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 04:50:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"reluctance to post diaries"

nice, i am not alone ;-)

by fredouil (fredouil@gmailgmailgmail.com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 05:12:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"What does not destroy me makes me stronger" Nietzsche, who also said: "Do not fear the enemies who hate you, fear the friends who flatter you."

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 05:38:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you inviting people to put themselves forward for a battering from the critics in the name of character building??!  
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 06:53:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What battering?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 06:53:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
only fish should be battered!
by PeWi on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 10:31:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't know about that: a plate of veggie tempura is quite hard to resist.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 10:48:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
true, true - oh. I am getting hungry.
by PeWi on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 10:53:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fish and chips is the best.

But only if thoroughly doused with malt vinegar.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 11:20:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sliced Banana

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 11:35:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh that was one of my favourite things in Thailand, fried bananas. I ate bags of them. Covered with sesame seeds.  Oh. Now I'm hungry.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 11:40:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A few years ago a friend of mine turned up with two boxes full of Bananas, we sent them off for 20 pints of milk and a couple of boxes of icecream, and had a couple of days trying every banana recipe we could think of. Banana milkshakes, Banana splits, banana fritters, banana pancakes, Banana Curry. Amazingly we all still eat bananas.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 11:56:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Where else can you go where a third of the people are PhD students?
Wikipedia in the good old days?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 06:55:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You mean before wikipedia bothered to have citations?

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 01:04:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL, yes.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 01:18:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sheffield University

BSc Applied Maths & Computing Science - 3rd Class
       Snooker: Lower 2nd Class
       Table Tennis: Upper 2nd Class.

University of Life

  • MA in Applied Matrimony (Passed after 2 essays: Oliver & Sebastian)

  • PhD currently working on a "Metaphysics of Value" (but philosophical about my chances)


"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson
by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 01:00:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is snooker as much fun as American pool, or have you not tried that?

"When the abyss stares at me, it wets its pants." Brian Hopkins
by EricC on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 06:41:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think snooker is more fun. Richer rules.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 06:57:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the diploma I did before my PhD is considered more significant and more valuable than the PhD...

So:
Graduate of Ecole Polytechnique
Ph.D in economics on "the independence of a country lessons from game theory and application to the case of Ukraine"

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 01:19:00 PM EST
I believe there are other miners here? ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 01:37:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't even pretend to understand the set of degrees under the Bologna system.  Serious headache to be had there.  

I found the university administration in Spain to be thoroughly opaque, and eventually just gave in and took the classes that looked interesting. I think that was a good decision.

I do think that it's interesting that this site draws a crowd that's far more "educated" in terms of degrees than is true in the wider world.

The important point here being, that I think that ET has the potential to become something of an online journal of the Left that has largely been abandoned by the "Godfathers" at the big orange place.  It's that old strategy versus tactics problem.  ET seems to be a safe harbor for people who are interested in strategy.

I've been on this punctuated equilibrium kick over the last few months.

People loathe uncertainity, and even when unable to make precise predictions, they want to be able to have calculate odds.  And that's why idea systems like neo-liberalism persist far past their expiration date. THe alternative is a terrifying state of affairs where risk is uncalculable.  So we cling to the chimera of certainty.

And as we've discussed several times, dark sprits like the BNP wait for the darkness of uncertainty to fall upon us, and offer security, at a cost.

And for those of us who recognize that the current set of idea has failed, we have to present some platform to provide certainty when the fall comes.  Maybe a bit grandiose, but that's why I think that ET and places like it are important.  

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 02:11:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
dKos is for mass organizing, eurotrib is more of a policy think tank or maybe a journal as you suggested. Both serve different purposes. dKos never aspired to be what eurotrib is, nor should it, and I think the opposite is true as well.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 04:22:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
M.A. Royal College of Art.

I was much inspired at my first art college in Leicester, by a head of department (sculpture) saying to me "You're here to learn how to learn. This is only the beginning, and it will still be only the beginning when you leave here in 3 years"

He also said "This is the most fun 3 years you will ever have". Which turned out to be not entirely true.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 01:36:20 PM EST
Master of Theology on "Does Calvin have a Natural Theology? An idea historical approach with special consideration of Augustine and Thomas of Aquinus.
Utter crap but it was fun!
by PeWi on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 01:36:57 PM EST
I hope this is Calvin of "Calvin and Hobbes"

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 02:24:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BA History, English, and enough accounting to sit for the CPA.

Would lie to have taught medieval-Renaissance history, but the world interevened.

Never got back to academe. We need esaays on Acquinas, Calvin, Luther, and Zwingli, btw.

"When the abyss stares at me, it wets its pants." Brian Hopkins

by EricC on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 06:33:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We need esaays on Acquinas, Calvin, Luther, and Zwingli, btw.

and Melanchthon...

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

by Melanchthon on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 06:50:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
foul excuse I know, but all my books are in storage in G. and for those kinds of diary, I would want to refer to at least some of them.

Iam also not quite a witty as this guy or as serious as this guy

by PeWi on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 08:57:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I got a gentleman's degree (3rd class) in electronics from Salford University. although I loved learning about quantum mechanics and particle physics, I rapidly discovered I don't have the level of interest to translate that from lecture theatre to paid employment.

Now post-transition and feeling a suppressed personality begin to emerge, I realise that, in fact, I would have been better off doing entirely different things. I'd love to do other study, but don't really know how to find out what it is I want to do (I'd really like to go back to school and start again).

Still, I like beer and cheese
and that's better qualification than all of these

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 02:30:57 PM EST
Try out life long learning courses in random interesting subjects and maybe something will grab you.  

But beer is good. I may have a chemistry degree but I don't do a damn thing with it that is of any practical use.

I'd far rather know how to do up a house with the electrics and plumbing and plastering and carpentry than know about firing neutrons at a polymer solution.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 02:55:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a friend who graduated with a chemical engineering degree, and who had interned at Merck.

He made the best of his degree, he's now the brewmeister at a small microbrewery.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 03:21:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think that is the best possible use of a chemistry degree.  I didn't do any chemical engineering though.  I can't make beer but I can drink it.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 04:40:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A friend of mine did his PhD in the behaviour of Yeast in the brewing process, can't give you more precise details, as my Brain was just lost in admiration of someone who could spend his entire PhD time testing beer.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 07:58:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nowadays, at the end of the Classes Préparatoire (Two intense years preparing for the Grande Ecoles, after the baccalauréat), one has to present a TIPE, essentially a 10-minutes report on research that may include reporting about experiments ; especially in the biology classes.

A group of these biology students did their report on alcohol absorption by the human stomach, under various conditions : with or without oil, strong or weak alcohol, etc... All based of self-experimentation, of course. They got the best grades in the whole country (it is a national competitive exam)...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 08:24:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have an engineer's diploma in Computer Science. As the French couldn't do like everybody else with their neat division between undergraduate and graduate divide, I'm not sure whether it corresponds to BSc or MSc.

I did a DEA along with my last year of engineering school, but found I wasn't really capable of the unfocused work of research. Not enough self-motivation.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 03:45:34 PM EST
Oops...I missed the PhD spot and marked professional degree...so there should be five PhDs there now.

I have a masters in counseling and a PhD in psychology...

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia

by whataboutbob on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 03:55:50 PM EST
Another PhD who can't even hit the right hole in a poll... ;)

Bluewin back up again?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 04:01:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
<heh!> not all PhDs are left-brained either!!

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 04:33:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, and my dissertation was titled: "Stressful life events and self-concept change in young adults" (!?!?)

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 06:10:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Do you have a copy I can read?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 06:11:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I got into an elite place and so have one of those degrees that are supposed to be worth more than their face value -- ie Oxford gives you an MA just for getting a BA. I went on to grad studies and was halfway to a BLitt and sketching out a DPhil thesis (all this in EngLit), when I realized I didn't know what I really wanted to do / found academic life lonely / believed society as we knew it was about to be overthrown and utterly rebuilt / considered I should join the working class and apply for a job as a postman, any and all of these and perhaps others... So I stopped there.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 03:56:17 PM EST
A Wat tyler is born everyday.

"When the abyss stares at me, it wets its pants." Brian Hopkins
by EricC on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 06:46:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have the Finnish equivalent of a MSc degree ("Diplomi-insinööri") in Computer Science.

"The basis of optimism is sheer terror" - Oscar Wilde
by NordicStorm (m<-at->sturmbaum.net) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 03:58:42 PM EST
Phd ( Neurobiology )- dont ask why ;-)
Master IT
Master Accounting
MBA

but that doesnt help my IQ seems lower than the average ET ;-) LOL

by fredouil (fredouil@gmailgmailgmail.com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 04:02:03 PM EST
Ah wonderful, a chance to talk about ourselves :-)

4 very nice years at Camberwell Art School, a bit too relaxed actually, based on the Romantic myth of the artist - just hang around and wait till inspiration comes. When, so often, it didn't (not much input, not much output), it was across the road to the pub for a chat :-) But it was a nice way to mature - a bit.

Then 9 months art teacher training, when we had massive input by comparison, history, philosophy, psychology of education, and I found it very stimulating. But a key event was almost last day of the course when they showed some extracts from classic films I hadn't seen (one might have thought this seventh art would have been given a bit more prominence in a course for art teachers in the 20th c.) - it was a revelation.

That summer I went on a Brit Film Institute summer school and loved the discussions. I started their four year evening diploma course. During the day I was teaching art in a mixed grammar school. Nice job. Had a great, very intelliegnt lecturer for that first year who had a sort of Marxist-Leavisite (close reading) approach. For the fourth year I opted to make a short film instead of a thesis - pretty radical for an academic course then.

I overlapped that year with first year of a four year evening course in philosophy at Birkbeck College, London. I was in my argumentative (you noticed ? :-)) element. Did well and was accepted to go straight on to a Ph D (things were more relaxed then) in art and ideology.

But I got a chance to write two course units and make a TV programme on War and the Media for the Open University, so gave up the Ph D to do that (gave me a bigger audience and more motivation and direction).

The subject matter was due to the most important part of my education - reading Noam Chomsky; worth ten of most academic courses. My first published piece was a letter to the Listener showing that the reviewer of one of Chomsky's books, who'd called him a "subtle casuist",  deserved the appelation himself because he'd misleadingly put together two sentences from the book as if they followed each other, when they were 100 pages apart! The reviewer was no less a figure than Warden of All Souls College (post-grad), Oxford, very high on the academic ladder. It helped cure me of my slight (working class) awe of such people.

Then I had the wonderful luck to go on to be a lecturer in media theory and history. Because it was a relatively new subject, I was left alone to write my own syllabus, constantly changing as I educated myself at the same time. Since the media includes just about everything, it was a very broad, continuing self-education. My education continues in researching for diaries and comments here - and like others, I find the level often as high as anything in academic courses.

Well, you asked :-)

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 04:58:31 PM EST
I am a product of lifelong learning.

I started as a machine-tool operator, went to adult vocational training were I got a mechanical fitter CAP (vocational training certificate). I became an engineer in diesel engines, heavy trucks and earthmoving equipment through on the job learning. I then moved to be a training designer and became a consultant in human resources. I then went to University while working as a consultant and got a DESS (master) in business administration. I needed to add theory to my practical knowledge, so I did another two years of University while working and got a DEA (half-way between master and PhD) in management science focused on strategy.

However, I must say I learnt a lot through two channels:  debating in bistrots and reading literature.

I also qualify as a father of two daughters (but they might deny me the qualification...)

I used to be highly qualified as a night reveller and a lover, but I need retraining (or at least refreshing) in both disciplines.

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

by Melanchthon on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 06:19:39 PM EST
BSEE here. No interest in further formal education for me - I have a very hard time sticking to a forced schedule without burning out quickly. 5 years of engineering school was enough.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 06:29:07 PM EST
But I really did love my time in school.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 01:06:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good Diary.

Someone should do one about hobbies.

"When the abyss stares at me, it wets its pants." Brian Hopkins

by EricC on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 06:48:22 PM EST
BSc (Hons - no less) in Electronic Engineering from some red brick place Up North.

Not quite a total waste of time, because I learned how to hack the Uni mainframe and play on the Internet back when it was still DARPAnet.

And I borrowed plenty of interesting books from the library, very few of which had anything to do with electronics.

Subsequently did the usual start-up grind (and wasn't that fun) before drifting into media. And currently re-inventing myself as an artist, apparently.

There's also an OU module on music theory and composition in the mix somewhere.

I'm still sort-of interested in a PhD somewhere or other in something or other, but it's hard to think of something that I'd be accepted for that wouldn't be a complete waste of time.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 07:08:52 PM EST
Got my High School diploma and a couple of years of university.  Got a summer job programming and never went back to finish.  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 07:51:48 PM EST
I seem to have a bit of both but later in life accepted an expatriot assignment and after that I completed a business degree at Lesley University.
I have to recommend the expatiot experience as the most life enhancing thing I have ever done.  Not only does one get to experience another culture and it's traditions this new knowledge allows one to view the "home" culture in vastly different ways.
by Lasthorseman on Mon Jul 30th, 2007 at 09:58:38 PM EST
Did a BA in Anthropology because I wanted to and later an MA Counseling-psychology because I had to - but was able to blend the two through an interest in cultural determinants of personality. That was a long time ago. I believe the real value of formal study is expansion of one's horizons and opening of some doors. Still, it's what you do afterwards that counts.  

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 12:35:19 AM EST
i went to 'good' prep and public boarding schools in s. england and was 'asked to leave' from both, early...

so at 16 i went to a crammer, asked to leave from that, had a private tutor, who was an eccentric genius, but we had too much fun to pass a-levels, so i went to another day-crammer and got 3 a-levels, in english, german and french.

happily shook off academics as a waste of time, and launched off into the experiential, hitching around morocco for 6 months, coming back to london, earning a bit of money doing shit jobs, then bailed to india overland, through yugoslavia, bulgaria, greece, turkey, iran, afghanistan down to tamil nadu, where i studied yoga at an ashram.

got tired of being asked to give pseudo-adulation to a conman, so took off walking and hitching round s. india for three more months.

went back to england, found no avenues open, so got a job working in vineyards, raised the money to go the states, worked shit jobs there, and in my late thirties went to massage school, obtained my state license with a 100% exam score, and went on to further studies in thai massage in bangkok, craniosacral in switzerland and california, and various other healing disciplines here and there.

by then i had regained the joy in owning an intellect, and had discovered public television in the usa, opening a passion for public affairs and history/politics which has never left, leading me here!

i studied choir music in summer school, and had the privilege of singing with big choirs at salisbury and st albans, which had a bigger effect on me than i realised at the time, exposing me to extraordinary acoustics and mystical architecture.

i studied one term's piano when i was 9, which also had a much deeper effect than i realised.

swept up in the brilliant musical waves that rolled across england during my teen years, i got into folk and blues guitar, and performed at little clubs in london like the troubadour, in earl's court.

got into songwriting while in the usa, and this has become my main avenue of self-expression, along with instrumental piano pieces.

now i'm studying organic farming and land management.

have been a voracious reader since the age of 4, had a psychic orgasm when the whole earth catalogue came out, and love learning about almost anything my mind can grasp.

so i know very little indeed about quite a lot of things, and would adore a university environment at this point in my life, if i could decide what to study there...

architecture, ceramics, computer music recording, music composition, electronics, amp modding, solar plumbing?

aspiration?

to be as much of a 'sodding polymath' (lol!) as i can be!

i always liked hanging out with folks smarter than me, and i sure lucked out here at ET!!

i guess you all must need a token dropout to give the views of a brain untramelled from too much academia...

helen,  i love your diaries!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 01:07:29 AM EST
helen,  i love your diaries!

Crumbs, thanks and to everyone else who's said that. I really don't quite know what you see in them cos everybody else's diaries are about politics and serious stuff while I just write about beer, cheese and bellydancing. Plus I bellyache a lot in response to other's diaries.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 07:10:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No one sane gives a shit about politics and serious stuff if they don't have to. Beer, cheese and dancing are, on the other hand, always important.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 07:17:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for reminding me about 'crumbs' - hardly anyone uses it any more. But I've always liked it. My father's favourite was 'Blimey, O'Reilly'. I used 'cripes' a lot when I read comics.

I was most pleased to hear one of my daughter's use 'It looks a bit black over Bill's mother's' the other day, in connection with some nasty clouds. Bill's mother, of course, lives in whatever direction you define. It is a Leicester expression, now living on in Swedish-Finnish culture ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 07:58:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My mother and Grandmother both used to use Bills mother being from Kettering and Rothwell, although my Girlfriend thinks some of my sayings are a bit odd (but what would she know, she's a cockney)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 11:47:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am sure a PhD could be derived from a study of the spread of such memes. In fact, didn't Iona and Peter Opie do a book about it?


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 11:55:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Polly put the kettle on, the childrens nursery rhyme is a Northamptonshire story about the murder of a woman in a domestic violence situation. Unfortunately the place that it originates from is now a supermarket car park.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 12:05:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Now you've reminded me of 'Who let Polly out of prison?' as a polite request for the origin of anonymous flatulence.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 12:09:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh dear - I forgot the diary title....

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 12:11:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If you google "polly put the kettle on" you'll find several pages claiming
"Polly put the kettle on" was published in 1797. The origin of "Polly put the kettle on"  was based on the author having five children - two boys and three girls. There were constant arguments as the boys wanted to play soldiers and the girls wanted to play house! When the girls wanted to play without their brothers they would pretend to start a game of tea party "Polly put the kettle on" and the daughter, called Polly, would put the toy kettle on! As soon as the brothers left Sukey (or Susan) would take it off again! Their father was so amused by this ploy that he set it to words and added the music which were subsequently published.
or something to that effect. What gives?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 12:10:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There is folklore, but no folk law.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 12:13:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Was at a presentation by an eminent Historian talking about local history who produced  a pile of documents perporting to be the history of said nursery rhyme. the story she presented was that it was the story of an argument at a hose next door to a local pub. the landlady of the pub was asked to put the kettle on to calm the argument down however before the kettle had boiled the husband had killed the wife, and so the landlady asked one of her members of staff to take the kettle off as the wife was dead and it was all too late.  She showed how local documentation could illustrate details of local history in unexpected ways, the other part of the lecture  showed that the towns royal hotel, had never had queen Victoria stay there, and that Charles Dickens had hidden several miles away when he visited to cover a local election because the local kids were all robbers and the women were all prostitutes. So all of the good Burghers of the town who were present were less than impressed.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 12:21:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 05:02:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you call that bellyaching?

superior snark dispenser, i'd say.

your grasp of the histoy of the labour party i found highly illuminating, and your experience at the bbc gave you a lot of insights into britpol and the media.

whenever you say you're off for a while, i sigh, then you come back and lay another golden egg!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 02:26:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BA double major in asian studies and religion, now i'm slogging through a Ph.D. program in chinese history. done a bunch of intensive language programs here and there, but you don't get degrees for them.

and then there's a vast black hole of interesting stuff online, that i've been sponging off of ever since i discovered it, i suppose that's a sort of "independent study" education in its own right. ET is a great place for that sort of thing, and it's really nice to listen to some unabashed socialists for a change, after all the defensive no-i'm-not-too-radical-really-i-support-the-status-quo dreck you get on most american political blogs.

by wu ming on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 04:21:27 AM EST
a vast black hole of interesting stuff online

you got that right!

i really enjoy your comments over at dk, it's great you come hang with us here too.

cheers, wu ming

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 02:20:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I studied Physics as an undergraduate and then doubled up with a Math degree. I started Math one year after and finished it two years after Physics because I was an Erasmus student for a year and I concentrated on the Physics there. Then I did graduate courses in Physics while I finished Math and went on to get a Ph.D. in mathematics (with a formal masters along the way). Then I got a Statistics qualification from the Royal Statistical Society, though I haven't done all their exams.

I don't think it really matters, I don't call myself "Dr." nor put letters after my name. I can say I was a great student, but I was positively underwhelmed by my research.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 05:30:33 AM EST
What is the highest level of education I've completed? I would have to say Bachelor's, since my MA was en route to my PhD, and a PhD is not really completed until retirement from the field.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 06:22:28 AM EST
That's an interesting take on the Ph.D. which I hadn't heard before.

My personal favourite is "a Ph.D. dissertation is a paper written by a professor under aggravating circumstances".

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 06:38:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well I have a variety of education, a gentlemans degree in Philosophy, a variety of Computing qualifications, grade 5 in singing and music theory.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 08:17:25 AM EST
    I took my high school equivalency at 16, then went to the local community college for 2 years (intending to transfer to the four year Uni) until I was evicted from the house, at the age of majority, by the wicked stepmother. The promised tuition and support from my father never manifested itself, the need to nourish the body (i.e.; eat) took precedence. After a short stint as a painter's apprentice (the fumes and thinners were noxious), I found a job as a telecom technician. A year or so later, a coworker and I struck out and founded our own corporation that specialized in the resale and installation of high-end digital switches. The business partner turned out to be a little loopy and I chose to exit stage left.

After a few years homesteading in the rural south (US) and running a small electrical business, I accepted an offer as a journeyman with an electrical contractor and headed back west. This led to an opportunity to join the local electrical union as a journeyman. I availed myself, for the next two and a half years, of their nightly journeyman classes. After about eight years of the daily grind, I tired of it and started up my small electrical business again.

I have subsequently married and moved to Europe. I am currently taking an intensive language course (Deutsch), and will look for work as a solar electrician or start up my own shop. Although my wife's offer of support while I finish my undergraduate (and desired law) degree is awfully tempting, I miss the tools and will probably decline, for now at least.

BTW: My wife has an MPH and an MBA, both from top Universities, and I always joke that she's just holding mine or that she has enough for the both of us. ;-) The women are smarter in every way!

Gioele

PS: Still waiting for the paperwork to be processed for my Cittadinanza Italiana to be processed, all the docs are in but the Italian bureaucracy is slow...

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 09:56:31 AM EST
Doh!... One too many "to be processed"...

Feels like it though... I think Italian time is akin to Caribbean time.

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 10:01:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
heh, italy approaches the efficiency of '60s india on a good day, closer to burundi most of the others...

and now we're in the season when 'le feste' is trotted out like the mantra it is, to excuse any and everything under the sun, which is undoubtedly the cause of so much that is 'ballsed-up' here, as peoples' brains turn to sticky goo at anything over 25 degrees, i find, unless at least theri toes are in some cool water.

no wonder they call italy the best-dressed third-world country ther is, lol!

are you planning to move to cool rational n. europe, or is that german study just for kicks?

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 02:32:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Some comuni seem to have it together, some consolati as well, others, not so much...

I'm living in Berlin for the next year, and if I can handle the winter here we'll probably buy a place while it's still affordable...

Though having never explored much of the continent, who knows where we might like it... though southern Italy is too hot for me, despite my Sicilian blood, or mayhap because of it... I think, climatically speaking, the Canton of Ticino on Lake Lugano somewhere looks nice...

Any other Berliners out there?

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 09:48:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I believe nanne is in Berlin.

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 05:04:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a bad period for citizenship or even permits in Italy. The laws are a mess while guidelines to impliment them only compound the inanity. The computer programs put together to handle the mess are inefficient as well as the people employed to use them. There's a total misunderstanding between the post offices, now charged with collecting all those papers, and the interior depaartment.

Once upon a time, long long ago you could count on citizenry in a year or two. Nowadays you're lucky to get a permit-to-stay in that length of time.

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 08:17:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
AA in liberal arts from Yuba College in Marysville California, no big deal there in the big scheme of things, but there were the most committed and approachable professors I ever studied under.  Before Yuba I was a poor student, afterwards I was very good.

Geography BA Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA (just north of San Francisco)

Empire College School of Law.  Nights while working in the Public Defenders office days.

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson

by NearlyNormal on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 01:55:39 PM EST
More anecdotal evidence for my hypothesis that the best path to higher education in the US starts at a Community College. After that it's 2 years' 4-year State college, 2 years' graduate work at a State research University, and then the sky's the limit.

I love speaking at Community Colleges because that's where brown kids go to school — Sherman Alexie on his 10 little Indians book tour @ Riverside Community College in 2003

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 05:09:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well said, though for me, at that time it was 2 yrs Community College and then 4 years at University because I changed course midway through University.

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson
by NearlyNormal on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 02:07:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, yeah, but the point stands.

A susprising fraction of my most engaged undergraduate students turned out to be community college transfers.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 02:24:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I agree with your point, CC made it all possible for me.

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson
by NearlyNormal on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 03:29:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Absolutely.  In the US a Community College costs from nothing to $1,000 (not including text books) a semester.  The cost does not reflect the quality of the instruction.  The best instructors I've had taught at the CC level simply from the fact they wanted to teach rather than play the academic games.

If I included all the CC courses I've taken over the years I've got about 9 years worth of college level courses.

And no degree.  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Fri Aug 3rd, 2007 at 01:03:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Great diary, ManfromMiddletown. The responses are excellent, reflections of the contributors.

Since I'm new, here, I thought it might be an occasion for me to introduce myself.

Lasthorseman, melo and Helen's remarks had me nodding in agreement, in particular.

Like Lasthorseman I grew up in the US [California, as for me] but have spent most of my adult life in France. Shortly after graduating from U of Ca, San Diego, I was invited to collaborate on a design project in Strasbourg ... and, well, I simply never returned to the US. It isn't as though at any point I actually made a decision to stay, I was just too excited by France, learning French [ie, a whole new way of thinking] and discovering Europe, to give the idea of return much thought. The delight continues as ever.

As for education, after some hesitation, I settled on a 'special studies' program combining studio art and pre-medical science, which ended in a BA.

I've been working in publication and mutimedia, for years, now, with some success and renown, but am wondering, presently, how/when I'm going to end the enslavement to digital equipment ...

That aside, the first real and most formative education I received came from spending much of my childhood on me Pater's sailboat. Living on a boat, you learn how to do with a minimum, and that's a lesson that endures. Sailing and boating provide serious problem-solving challenges which, applied more broadly, could ultimately amount to golden advice to the land-locked of this energy-challenged age [cf, DeAnderer].

Cheers, all

by Loefing on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 04:09:01 PM EST
woops, sorry about the bolding. asterisks, then are translated as bold. Oh.
by Loefing on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 04:12:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BA in linguistics with a minor in theater. Completed one year of PhD study for linguistics before switching to audiology, got an MA in that, and then burned out. Currently working in editing (before I get any snippy comments about my grammar, I never said I could edit my own writing, just that of other people) and as a voice actor, which makes my pre-amp comment from a few days ago even more embarrassing.
by lychee on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 05:05:07 PM EST
Now that we've had a thread on hobbies and a thread on education we need a thread on burnout.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 05:04:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The things taught in schools are not an education but the means to an education.
- Ralph Waldo Emerson

The difference between theory and practise in practise ...
by DeAnander (de_at_daclarke_dot_org) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 07:18:48 PM EST
There is education and there is instruction.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 05:03:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
(who I've had the pleasure to hang out with several times; the fiance and I should come by Davis sometime)

I'm a PhD in a history program at the University of Washington. My focus is on urban development and political change in San Francisco in the decades after World War II. I might actually finish the damn degree this year. 6 years is long enough.

I received an MA from the same program. My BA is from UC Berkeley, a truly great place.

And, like wu ming, I've found that my coursework has been greatly supplemented by a much richer and broader education through the blogosphere. I've popped my head in and out of EuroTrib since it launched, and enjoy it immensely. I plan to be in Europe next summer, either for a honeymoon in Portugal, a conference in Lyon, or some combination of the two!

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Tue Jul 31st, 2007 at 08:19:09 PM EST
Hi, Montereyan! If you come to Lyon, let me know. I'll gladly welcome you here!


"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 03:24:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Heh, maybe we should provide Eurotribbers a space to upload CVs? Then we'd be more like a think tank... A kind of "Look at us, we have advanced degrees from universities, now pay attention to what we say, damnit!!"

My education stats:
B.S. and M.Eng. in Electrical Engineering from MIT
(The M.Eng. is a weird degree offered only to MIT undergraduates in EE/CS as an extension to the undergraduate degree. 'Cause MIT undergraduates are so superior that they can be allowed to complete a shorter masters that is mostly research and a thesis...)
Presently I am doing a PhD in Electrical Engineering at the University of Bristol [Precision RF phase measurements of charged particle beams], my research is carried out at CERN

This little PhD project has had me way to busy for the last month or so. Ahhh. I miss ET...

by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 05:00:42 AM EST
If we were like that we would have already used our "Bio" information to post a CV. As it is, half of the people have it empty and most people give the skimpiest of notices.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 05:02:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But it seems that you can only have about 3 lines of text in the bio - OK for the taciturn :-) So I used links to the comments (using the url you get by clicking on the ratings for the comment) - go to user pages/settings.

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:00:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Late to the party.

Wrapped up the MSc. Geology thesis on medical geology late 2005, tried to stick to the subject for a follow up, decided after a few fruitless months later it was not for me and reverted back to my interests that bloomed during my Master: Structural Geology. Which brought me to my current PhD research on the Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, almost six months counting and am very confused.

by Nomad on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:04:17 AM EST
Are you confused because of the geology, because of the move to South Africa, or because of other reasons?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:10:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was referring specifically about my PhD, which is 1) the geology 2) the literature on that geology and 3) what is expected of me as a PhD student.

I am also continuously confused, as part of my natural state of being.

And lastly the move to SA has challenged me on a personal level to a degree I find sincerely frightening. It is making me 1) re-assess my personal values, 2) stake out precisely my own moral values and where I want and need to stand, 3) question the very worth of this bloody PhD and coupled to that 4) develop an acute humanitarian interest.

by Nomad on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:32:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, yes. The transition between being a student and being a researcher. Good luck with that. It's as hard as becoming an adult.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:43:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Becoming an adult took me ten years. At minimum. And sometimes I wonder...
by Nomad on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:50:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, you're done with that already?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:51:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Probably began when I was, oh, nineteen years old. I'm twenty-nine now. Go figure.

Or, in the words of my girlfriend (yesterday): "Why can't you ever behave normal?!?"

by Nomad on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 08:03:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I probably began at 25 and am not done yet.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 08:04:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I tried being normal once.  It was extremely boring.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Fri Aug 3rd, 2007 at 01:10:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm 54 and beginning to circle adulthood warily sniffing it with my hackles up.

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson
by NearlyNormal on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 02:22:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Watch it carefully, it can bite you in the ass.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 03:10:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's a lot to go through all at once, Nomad.  It won't be easy, but you will feel good about yourself!

Take it slowly.

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

by metavision on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 05:13:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He's six months in. Of course he's confused.

I believe denial, anger and despair are the next scheduled phases.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:37:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Followed by acceptance?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:46:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Or apathy.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:47:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And a PostDoc at the ET Conference Centre.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:48:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Is there a hole for inveterate dropouts?
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 07:29:26 AM EST
French engineering degree in telecommunication from Telecom Bretagne, specialized in software together with a DEA (pre-phD program) in software. Started a PhD in software but stopped it after three monthes, gave some software engineering lectures in a master program then moved to my current position.
by Laurent GUERBY on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 09:10:34 AM EST
BSc Zoology
PhD Immunology

The best analogy ive read of enduring a phd is Frodo's mission in Lord of the Rings, writtten by David Pritchard,
Lord of the Rings: The Ph.D. Analogy

by darragh on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 11:36:03 AM EST
Uncanny analogy.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 11:41:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, it's exactly how I feel right now.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 11:51:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Change some of the labels and that analogy is a match for a corporate R&D project too.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Fri Aug 3rd, 2007 at 01:18:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BS Mass Communications
MFA
PhD English Lit.

And somewhere in between there I held a corporate jo and a job in law enforcement. Neither were for me.

by Upstate NY on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 12:18:06 PM EST
By the way (perhaps someone else has mentioned this), in the poll it asks: "What's you're highest level of education?" - it should be "your". My other hobby is pedantry and being part of the "education isn't what it used to be" brigade :-)

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Wed Aug 1st, 2007 at 06:53:48 PM EST
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