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Friday Bridge Blogging

by PeWi Sun Oct 9th, 2005 at 05:00:16 AM EST

From the diaries ~ whataboutbob

Today's TBB is about a Bridge that does not exist anymore, but which nevertheless, is still very present in many peoples mind, for its history. In its place is now a peace museum which bears the following theme:

Every day let us work for peace with our mind and heart.
Each person should begin with himself.
Well, this was written in 1980 and the German version is gender neutral.


The bridge's history starts in 1917,when Karl Viennese an architect from Mannheim is being asked to plan the 325 meters long bridge, whose headroom over the normal water level of Rhine amounted to 14.80 meters.  The highest point of the arch lay at 29.25 meters over the water surface.  The bridge carried two railroad tracks and a pedestrian track.  

The old railway tunnel still exist and two bridge towers in which a peace museum was established in 1980.


If you look closely, the two flags in this picture are the German and the US flag.

As most of you will have realised by now, the bridge I am talking about it the "Bridge of Remagen" a bridge worth its weight in Gold. However, I could not find out, how much this is in modern currencies...

So can you think of any other bridge, that does not exist anymore, but is nevertheless very famous?

these pages have some more images and some more information on the historical background.
http://www.tc-erpel.de/main/bruecke.html
http://www.railfaneurope.net/pix/de/misc/bridge/Remagen/pix.html
http://www.herrlichkeit-erpel.de/EnglischeVersion/Bruecke_eng.htm

Display:
I know I should not complain about TBB being promoted to the front page every week, but keeping it in the Diaries might actually give it a longer shelf-live..... So how about it? I promise to publish it earlier on Thursdays and hen you can promoted it to Friday Frontpage Bridge Blogging?
by PeWi on Thu Oct 6th, 2005 at 01:37:19 PM EST
It's good I read your comment...so be it...

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Thu Oct 6th, 2005 at 02:37:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks (-:
by PeWi on Thu Oct 6th, 2005 at 03:08:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here is a famous bridge before it really existed.  California's Golden Gate bridge while it was being built.

Photo from California Digital Library

There is a short history with more photos at this site.

by corncam on Thu Oct 6th, 2005 at 11:21:20 PM EST
Thank you for that picture, I was starting to think, my task was to difficult. Well, maybe it is. Thanks that you broke out of my restrictive set of demands....
by PeWi on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 05:37:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]

One of the first truly big bridges built in the Middle Age was the Pont de St. Benezet, in Avignon: 22 stone arch openings. It was abadoned three centuries ago, now only four arches remain.

It inspired the famous French folk solg Sur Le Pont D'Avignon (lyrics), which my grandfather used to sing us before sleep, during summer holidays when I was a kid.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 11:03:45 AM EST
Did you get your nick "DoDo" also from being called "DoDo" by whoever sang you to sleep as a little child? I have known this nick in this context used by grannies and mommies to sing and hug and shake their babies gently to sleep.
by mimi on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 03:45:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh no, my nick was more of a chance and recent happening... I long used a different one on the internet, but around the time I discovered blogs (c. one-and-a-half years ago), at some log-in-needing site my old nick was taken - and DoDo was the first thing that came to my mind. (It's mysterious and allows multiple interpretations, you just gave another, so please don't ask me to reveal the original ;-) )

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 08:22:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's a picture of a bridge that's not there any more. It might not fit your criteria of being famous, though.

The Colorado Midland Railway was the first standard gauge railroad to the mining districts of Colorado. It was built in the 1880s and eventually torn out in the 1930s. Severe winter weather, competition from other railroads, the collapse of the silver mining industry, and problems with government management during the First World War all contributed to its demise.

The route from the eastern prarie up into the mountains is particular steep just as you start, with a 7% grade for several miles. This required some daring engineering, including this bridge high over a residential area in Manitou Springs. You can't see any buildings in this picture, but there were some--one was crushed when an engine fell off the bridge.

by asdf on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 12:19:48 PM EST
Wait for the Monday Train Blogging three weeks from now! ;-)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 01:10:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]

This bridge is probably only famous among railway fans (at least fans of German railways). It was on the 'WCd-Linie', the first narrow-gauge railway built in Saxony. The line was closed by the communist government (against local opposition) decades ago, this bridge - in bad shape by then - was turned to scrap metal. Now a section rebuilt for tourists by a civilian initiative ends some distance from the bridgehead.

This US-style simple iron construction is rather rare in Europe (but, a bridge almost exactly like this survives on an Austrian narrow gauge museum railway).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 01:15:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Old RR bridges in America typically don't have those fancy walkways on them. It's pretty scary if you look down!
by asdf on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 01:23:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Darn.  I don't know how to put pictures in comments, but we have a cool bridge near here and its days may be numbered so it almost fits the criteria.

It's the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge -- the world's longest floating bridge.  It goes across the northern end of Lake Washington from Seattle to Medina.  There's another bridge on the south end of the lake which famously sank in a storm in 1990.

The Evergreen one isn't in great shape and is scheduled for replacement or repair.  Sometimes in winter, if you're driving in the outside lane, waves will come up and hit your car.  It's quite frightening.  I've never quite understood the rationale behind having a floating bridge, but I suppose they had their reasons.   There's some photos of it here.

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes

by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 12:59:29 PM EST
Okay, this knowledge gap I have about posting pictures is really starting to get to me -- I found one of the bridge that sank.  It was the first pontoon, floating bridge so it was famous, and now it's gone -- it fits the criteria perfectly!

The "good student" in me yearns to present you with the picture of this bridge, but instead I can only direct you to the link.  There are two photos, both from the opening in 1940.  The toll booth looks sort of cool in an art deco way.

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes

by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 02:07:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Read New Users Guide at top right of page.
by asdf on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 05:59:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hi Izzy, what you have to do is find an internet web photo host, as this site won't upload photos directly from people's computers. I use "photobucket.com", but there are likely better ones around. So you upload there first, then once there, you copy the url line into this formula:

(img src="the Url here"width=400")

except instead of the () you use <> and that should do it...

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia

by whataboutbob on Sat Oct 8th, 2005 at 08:23:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are two ways: you can hotlink it. like I did the following image:

or you can do it properly and download it onto your desktop, upload it to your account on a free image hosting website and link to it.

Normally you get hold of the image in right clicking (or ctrl-click - if you are an Apple user) onto the image on the original page. A couple of options should show up, if you go the hotlink option click - copy image location. then start posting a comment and the link into the window with the follwoing code. [ img src=" pasted link "] using < instead of [

If you go the more friendly route, the pasted link is where you have hosted the image on your free service.

Does that make sense?
P.S thanks for this bridge, it obviously has a really fascinating story. My favourite image is the one with the VW bus and the wave swapping over the street. I love VW- busses. ... Maybe I will start a Tuesday VW -Bus blogging...

by PeWi on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 02:50:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you, PeWi!!!  I'll have to give it a try next time.  Is that top photo the bridge sinking?  That's exactly like my fearful vision whenever I cross the 520.  That bottom photo is the 520 and I've been on it and had a wave slap our car.  I won't go near the thing in stormy weather now.  The whole concept of a floating bridge just strikes me as insane.

I like VW Buses too -- maybe we could just incorporate them into all the blogging?  VW Buses on bridges, racing trains, full of dogs -- I can see it.  ;-)

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes

by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 03:02:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If you start talking about VWs then this is going to turn into a car blog!

Out here in the western desert, there are hundreds of old VWs running around. I see busses being driven around practically every day, and bugs are popular cars for high school kids and retired army officers. The dry climate allows you to keep cars forever...

by asdf on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 03:37:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, no you don't.  Car blogging will lead to talk of roads and talk of roads will lead to talk of tolls and privatizing and E470 and I'm not going there again! ;-)

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 03:49:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You see mine
020816_02_024
was three month old than I. and it had quite a life, dragging me around Schotland and smuggling people across the Croatian/ Slovenian border. So many a fond memories...

but it wasn't the only mode of transport.
This

020814_01_009

got me around quite a bit as well.

by PeWi on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 07:49:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm terrified to do this, but here goes.  If I blow out margins or something I'm hoping someone can delete the comment?  If by some miracle I've done this correctly, it's a picture of the sunken bridge at its grand opening in 1940.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes

by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 04:24:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It worked!!  Thank you!!

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 04:31:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Izzy, if the image is too big (you can check the image size also with right-clicking: depending on the browser you use there is something like "file info"), use the following:

< img width="620" src="http://www.site.address/imagefile.jpg >

With is given in pixels. 620 is good for a diary entry, but if you put an image in a thread as a sixth-eigth reply (i.e. too inlined), reduce accordingly.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 08:16:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you, DoDo!  Now I know just enough to be dangerous!

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 08:25:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just a word of caution, 600 is alright if you open a thread, but if you are five deep in, it can cause those with tabs on the left side and a limiting 17" monitor, to silently curse you. ....  .... ... (-:

I usually do 400 or even smaller

by PeWi on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 08:33:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks again.  This info should bring the danger factor down a notch!  I will try not to abuse my new powers. :-)

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Oct 8th, 2005 at 01:44:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow Izzy, excitement seems to follow you around today, hope your were able to get some wholesome sleep anyway. :-)
by Fran on Sat Oct 8th, 2005 at 04:36:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is a fascinating bridge to anyone sho has ever sat through a lecture on simple harmonic motion in an introductory physics class.  A pattern of oscillation was induced by a sustained wind of 40 mph through the narrow valley in which it was located.

here's a link

Video link

here's a picture

by jordan on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 04:29:14 PM EST
Thank you, Jordan.  Y'know, we have this, plus the sinking bridge in PeWi's comment above, which I've found was the Hood Canal bridge sinking in 1979.  Then in 1990 we have I-90 sinking, pictured here:

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

I'm starting to get the idea that we in Washington state might not have the best bridge builders in the world.

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes

by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 04:53:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This was the first railroad bridge over the Mississippi river, between Rock Island, Illinois and Davenport, Iowa.  Soon after it ws built, in 1856, a steamboat collided with one of the piers and sank.  The steamboat line sued the bridge's owners, but Abraham Lincoln, a prominent Illinois lawyer, defended the bridge and won an important victory.  This case helped establish his national reputation, and he went on to became the president of the US during its civil war (1860-1865).

This bridge was destroyed by ice flows in 1868, and it has been rebuilt twice since then.  A short history is available from the Rock Island Arsenal.

by corncam on Fri Oct 7th, 2005 at 05:17:16 PM EST
Here is a photo of the old railway bridge of Chalabre now used for regular traffic:

by Lupin on Sun Oct 9th, 2005 at 06:01:21 AM EST


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