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French and German economic growth

by whataboutbob Sat Dec 24th, 2005 at 04:53:01 AM EST

From the front page. I'm just putting this out there as "positive news from Europe": French consumers boost spending

French consumers returned to the shops during November, helping drive a higher-than-expected rise in spending.
Statistical office Insee said that consumer spending rose by 1.1% in November from the previous month, and by 3.2% from a year earlier. (...) There are increasing signs that the economy is gathering momentum and recovering.

German economy 'to grow quicker'

Growth in the German economy, Europe's largest, is set to accelerate next year, lifted by exports and stronger investment, a report has said.

Growth also is set to improve in 2005, hitting a higher-than-expected 0.9%. Germany is emerging from a slowdown and the report is the latest to suggest the recovery is becoming more sustainable.

"The economy really is picking up," said Hans-Werner Sinn, president of the Munich-based research group. "After five years, there are clear signs that the economic lull has been overcome."

Just consider this a positive visualization...


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Reuters Deutschland: 2006 Institutes: Recovery Only Temporary Upswing

- by Sören Amelang - Berlin (Reuters) - According to the researchers at HWWA and IWH, the [German] economic recovery will be only a temporary upswing. Stagnation or even recession threatens as early as 2007 due to the Government's plans.

The German economy is currently experiencing a "recovery with a Janus's head", warned the economic research group Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung Halle (IWH) in its new growth prognosis on Wednesday. Although increase in the value added tax will drive the 2006 recovery to a greater extent than previously anticipated, it will also create a backlash in 2007. The researchers fear serious problems should the world economy cool off at the same time. The economists also hold out little hope for the job market.
...
(in German)

These may be the most negative voices regarding the economy, but most of the prognoses I've read lately seem to point to a jobless recovery.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Dec 21st, 2005 at 11:26:17 AM EST
These negative prognoses are part of the pro-business negative propaganda. And it's explicit: they want reforms, different kind of 'reforms' from the government.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Dec 21st, 2005 at 11:30:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is exactly the point. These "think-tanks" and "institutes" have become nothing more than a propaganda tool. Now that the promised gloom has not materialized, they can always find a way to push it out by a year or two and still manage to blame Germany's lack of "reforms."

Mikhail from SF
by Tsarrio (dj_tsar@yahoo.com) on Wed Dec 21st, 2005 at 12:37:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Granted they're trying to influence policy with their prognoses (as, presumably, are the positive "sages"). The jobless recovery seems to be a common denominator, though.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Dec 21st, 2005 at 11:59:48 AM EST
I give you that, it may well be a jobless recovery. But, I would suspect different policy shortcomings behind it than the German government's unwillingness of more radical labour market liberalisation.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Dec 21st, 2005 at 04:12:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I know that this is unrelated to this thread, but I decided to post here because it's a frontpage entry.

I'm currently watching a live webcast of the French parliament, because it's currently debating the infamous DADVSI law which is bound to tremendously restrict freedom on the internet. And I just realized that once this law is passed, I'll no longer be allowed to watch their webcasts with Linux in Windows Media Player format. Fortunately, Real Player has a player for Linux, which I am using right now, and the Parliament's webcast also proposes a real player format. But if tomorrow Real Player decide not to propose such a player, then I'll no longer be allowed to watch Parliament webcasts under Linux. If I do, I'll risk a maximum of 3 years in jail and a 300 000 euros fine.

How dumb are the parliament members in favour of this law? Answer: very.

by Alex in Toulouse on Wed Dec 21st, 2005 at 04:29:11 PM EST
But if tomorrow Real Player decide not to propose such a player, then I'll no longer be allowed to watch Parliament webcasts under Linux. If I do, I'll risk a maximum of 3 years in jail and a 300 000 euros fine.
Jail and a fine because of your choice of software?  Can that be true?
by wchurchill on Thu Dec 22nd, 2005 at 12:16:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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