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ATTENTION: READ THE RULES -- The Ethics of Journalism

by GraceReid Sun Jun 19th, 2005 at 08:42:34 PM EST

"Humanity, in the late 20th Century is moving like the woodworm.

"Propelled only by it's consumption and defecation, it eats it's way through history on a steady diet of media fabrications.

"The pity is this movement has no meaning, leaves no monuments -- no intelligible works of literature, history or art.

"Unlike the woodworm, the pattern humanity leaves behind is death and destruction.

"Unlike the woodworm the pattern left behind by humanity in the latter part of the 20th Century is not worth preserving -- the worm's path has more beauty and is of greater interest."

Rose Selavie, 1976; "Books I Cannot Print"


ATTENTION:

READ THE RULES (Daily Kos)

Two diaries daily maximum. If you need to post more, perhaps it's time to start your own blog.

No single-line diaries. If you want to bring attention to a single link, or make a one-line pithy comment, head on over to the Open Threads or an appropriate post or diary entry.

No repetitive diaries. If it's been blogged or diaried, there's no need to repeat it. Take a moment to ensure your topic hasn't been blogged. And if you post your same diary entry twice, consider it grounds for banning.

Use "Extended Copy" box. If your diary entry is longer than three paragraphs, use the extended entry box. Be considerate and don't clutter up the Diaries home page with epic entries.

ATTENTION: READ THE RULES

The Ethics of Journalism

Here Are The Rules

Preamble

Every human being has a right to information, to free expression and to criticism, in conformity with Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which states that:

"Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers."

From this right of the public to information and to the expression of diverse opinions, derives a set of rights but also of duties and rules for journalists. In this respect, the responsibility of journalists towards the public takes precedence over that which they may assume towards other parties, particularly the public authorities and their employers. To fulfil their mission of providing true and fair information, journalists must apply to themselves rules the strict observance of which is linked to work conditions that guarantee their independence and dignity.

The present charter lists duties and rights and it specifies the ethical principles which journalists are committed to respect scrupulously.

Rights and Duties

Seek factual truth in all circumstances and in all places so as to convey it to the public whatever the consequences of this may be for themselves.

Defend freedom of information and the rights that derive from it, freedom of comment and criticism, the independence and dignity of the profession.

Abstain from publishing any piece of information or document of unknown origin; make sure that the source or sources have been checked and, if need be, append the needed reservations; refrain from suppressing essential information or elements of information, from distorting a text or document; clearly indicate, when needed, that some news is unconfirmed; respect justified embargoes.

Not use unfair methods to obtain information, pictures or documents; state one's professional identity when seeking information; refrain from distorting facts, plagiarising, reproducing, wholly or in part, any document or quotation without mentioning the source of it.

Make sure to rectify any false or inaccurate piece of published information.

Observe professional secrecy and not reveal the sources of information obtained under condition of confidentiality.

Commit him/herself to respect the privacy of people, their moral integrity, their honour and dignity - insofar as this principle is compatible with public interest. Refrain from anonymous and unfounded accusations as well as from libel, slander, insult, offence, malicious insinuation. Respect discretion and decency.

Refuse any advantage, promise or practice that could hurt their professional independence and freedom of expression.

Refuse to sign advertising copy and accept no direct or indirect instructions from advertisers or possible sponsors.

Accept journalistic orders only from the appointed heads of the newsroom - and only insofar as they are consonant with the principles and rules of press ethics.

Fulfil the journalist's mission of informing honestly and fairly, all the while showing a keen sense of responsibility and modesty; quote the names of colleagues when you reproduce a story, or part of a story, written by them.

Pledge to fulfil his/her mission to inform in full respect of pluralism and of the diversity of ideas and opinions.

Not contribute to media outlets that compete with the one he/she works for. However, a journalist can, in circumstances specified jointly by him/her and newsroom managers or the publisher, occasionally freelance for other press organs.

Abstain from getting involved in a partisan, political or social cause because it might jeopardise his/her capacity to report and comment on events with objectivity and fairness.

Make it a rule to wear correct clothing and adopt correct behaviour while at work both in and out of the newsroom; avoid any public or private behaviour that could disgrace the profession or the medium they work for.

Strictly refrain from any act, any attitude or any written, spoken or filmed production likely to generate ethnic, racial, regional, religious conflict - or likely to encourage warmongering, xenophobia and any other form of exclusion.

Source: Independent Press Councils

Dedicated to I.F. Stone of I.F. Stone's Weekly, Michael Smith of TimesOnLine, and Greg Mitchell of Editor & Publisher

"Journalists are Brain Surgeons. Some of them are practicing medicine without a license. In most cases the patient didn't even know he/she was ill, and gave uninformed consent to have the operation performed. In almost all cases, however, the anaesthetic was administered with the utmost care." Rose Selavie, "Books I Cannot Print" 1976

Happy Father's Day, Dana Milbank!

Display:
don't like the news?  

go out and write some of your own!

somebody didn't cover a story?  go cover it!

can't get printed in one paper?  go out and try another!

found a paper that likes your stuff?  watch out!  remember what Groucho Marx said:

"I wouldn't want to belong to any organization that would have me."

by GraceReid on Sun Jun 19th, 2005 at 08:45:27 PM EST
I missed the bit where we decided the rules. Which site are these copied off? dKos? Booman Tribune? It would be nice if you attributed them.

Abstain from getting involved in a partisan, political or social cause because it might jeopardise his/her capacity to report and comment on events with objectivity and fairness.

I really don't see the relevance of journalism ethics to this site, especially to diaries on this site?

And if you post your same diary entry twice, consider it grounds for banning.

Sez who?

Make it a rule to wear correct clothing and adopt correct behaviour while at work both in and out of the newsroom; avoid any public or private behaviour that could disgrace the profession or the medium they work for.

I might have broken that rule while writing a diary before showering. To whom should I apply to be disciplined?

I think it's probably a bit early in the run of this site for a discussion on the issues raised by this diary, but for you to phrase it in the way you did seems perhaps a little presumptuous?

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Jun 20th, 2005 at 02:09:45 AM EST
Part One: "Books I Cannot Print" by Rose Selavie, 1976

Part Two:  Daily Kos Attention: Read The Rules

Part Three: Ethics of Journalism

Part Four:  Tribute to Great Journalists

Part Five:  Dana Milbank writes for the Washington Post.

by GraceReid on Mon Jun 20th, 2005 at 02:46:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought it was the dKos one. They're at a different stage of development than here: I personally prefer Booman's Code: "don't be a prick", though I might phrase it slightly differently. Much more appropriate for a site at this stage.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Jun 20th, 2005 at 03:17:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The European Tribune is founded by active contributors to the US progressive blogosphere, aiming to emulate its energy, wealth of information, and community spirit with a focus on European and international issues.

The European Tribune is a forum for thoughtful political dialogue between European countries on their national and European affairs and also with Americans (and Canadians and others!) on world affairs.

In the context of the Bush administration's "War on Terror", official transatlantic dialogue has become bitter and rancorous and we must make sure that citizens on both sides of the ocean have a chance to better understand each other's problems, internal debates and ideas. Information on the domestic politics of both sides of the ocean - and how it is perceived from elsewhere - are a core staple of the European Tribune. Global issues like peak oil, the emergence of China, the future of the European Union, immigration, pollution will be discussed from various perspectives.

Lighter stories, travel experience, personal testimonies and the like are explicitly encouraged

by GraceReid on Mon Jun 20th, 2005 at 03:47:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, that's the about statement for this site. I don't see your point?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Jun 20th, 2005 at 03:59:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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