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1981 Spain Coup Officer Asks for Referendum

by ManfromMiddletown Sat Jan 28th, 2006 at 10:20:11 AM EST

For more background on the ongoing situation with the Catalan Estatut and the state of the Spanish autonomies see my earlier diary, For King or Country, or Migeru's diary.

On February 23 (23-F)of 1981, Antonio Tejero, a Lieutenant Colonel of the Civil Guard broke into the Cortes, the Spanish parliament holding the MPs and Spain hostage for a night.

from the diaries ~ whataboutbob


In light of the proposed deal on the Catalain Estatut, Mariano Rajoy, leader of the opposition Spanish Popular Party (PP), demanded a national referendum on the matter.  In this he was seconded by Tejero.

On the 25 of January, Tejero wrote a letter trashing Zapatero, and supporting  a national referendum on the passage of the Estatut.  What follows is the text of that letter.

Until when ..... Zapatero?

Antonio Tejero Molina, Lt Colonel of the Civil Guard expelled from the Armed Forces for 23-F.

Following the news of the secret meetings between Zapatero and his loved ones, as well of its consequences, there is but one question to ask: "Who do these people believe they are to play with the integrity of Spain?"

Who are they to distribute our money to Catalan parties who onlt wish to throw Spain to the wind?

Perhaps to make us yet more like sheep to than they already have? Is it that they  don't plan to stop throwing wasps upon us until our noses swell, and throw us to the middle of the street?

Less wrong that they haven't spoken with the King, that if they are to speak of the 23-F as a rebellion, they should speak of this the same, that they intend to break the crown  which he holds.

Because if not what is this of Catalunya being a nation?

This is not in the premable nor the body of any document, nor has it ever been.

What cowards would we be should we allow this to become a vile reality?  Why not ask in a referendum if this is what the Spanish people want?

I pray to God, in whom I still publicly belive, to impress upon the King the wisdom to see this clearly, and to confuse those who would give away the country for 30 votes, or something more shameful.
............

Hasta cuándo... Zapatero?
Antonio Tejero Molina Teniente Coronel de la Guardia Civil, expulsado del Ejército por el 23 F.

Ante las noticias de las reuniones secretas de Zapatero y sus afines, así como de sus consecuencias, no hay más que una respuesta: ¿Quiénes se han creído que son esa gente para jugar con la integridad de España?

¿Quiénes son para repartir nuestro dinero a manos llenas a unos partidos catalanes que lo único que quieren es mandar a España a tomar viento? ¿Acaso nos creen aún más borregos de lo que somos?

¿Es que no van a parar de echarnos avispas para que se nos hinchen las narices y tiremos por la calle de en medio?

Menos mal que creo que no han contado con el Rey, que igual que habló aquel 23 F porque estalló una rebeldía, también hablará ahora, porque la verdad es que están intentando romper la Corona de España de la que es depositario.

Porque si no ¿qué es eso de que Cataluña es una nación? No lo es ni en el preámbulo ni en las tripas de ningún documento; además no lo ha sido nunca.

Muy cobardes seríamos si permitiéramos que esto se convirtiera en una vil realidad. ¿Por qué no se pregunta a los españoles antes por refrendo si lo quieren así?. Rezo a Dios, ya que creo en él públicamente, para que haga imperar la cordura para que ilumine al Rey de las Españas y para que confunda a aquellos que entregan a la patria por 30 votos y quizás por algo aún más vergonzoso.

Madrid, 25 de enero del 2006

Update [2006-1-28 0:10:13 by ManfromMiddletown]:

Migeru bring up another interesting development:

El Pais: An association chaired by a PP cadre demands "filling the streets with resisting patriots"
"it will be necessary to fill the streets of Spain with resisting compatriots and that they do not resign themselves (...) There's no turning back. Tomorrow will be late". In an almost warlike tone and referring constantly to the reform of the Catalan Statute, Santiago Abascal, chairman of the Nuevas Generaciones (New Generations) of the PP in the Basque Country, presented yesterday the Foundation for the Defence of the Spanish Nation, not yet registered aas such, which he himself heads. The Ministry of Culture has rejected their application to be constituted as a Foundation on the grounds that its objectives coincide with those of the Ministry of Defence. For the moment, they are registered as an association.
I've found the website for the group here.

Display:
All errors in translation are mine.  This was a very idiomatic letter, and I tried to convey meaning rather that a strictly literal translation.

I'm certain Migeru (be nice to Migeru everyone, he's a valued member of the community) and Kcurie will oblige.  There's something deeply wrong the the PP is borrowing the rhetoric of people like Tejero.

A coup isn't go to happen, but the wisdom to see the reality of that might not exist in all corners of the Spanish military, note the Melilla connection.  All it takes is a very small group to decide that they will be the vanguard of the revolution to provoke a bloody mess.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 01:14:24 AM EST
"a bloody mess"

That is frightening, but it seems to me it does come down to the king to remind these nutcases that any revolt would be a revolt against the authority of the Crown (that they make so much of).

As for the PP putting in play a character like Tejero and his antiquated rhetoric, I'd say (in purely party political terms) let them make their bed and lie on it.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 04:23:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
By the way: can you or Migeru or kcurie dig up anything leading PP politicians said about Tejero and 23-F? Are there any public attempts within the PP to turn Tejero's coup attempt into a heroic attempt to defend Spain?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:01:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
At that time the party where PP comes from (AP) actually was quite small and did not support the coup as far as I can remember..

may be Migeru or Man could say otherwise and recall someone in the party supporting it..but I think they did not support it at all.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:13:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorry I forgot to indicate a timeframe - I meant positive words about Tejero recently, but before the appearance of this current article ManFromMiddletown quoted.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:22:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No,no...that will be the kissing of death...if they ever support Tejero..oh man.. that would be crazy...

That will digg in farther tha Auckland..that would be...suicide. The mere fact that he is saying the same thing as PP is Zapatero dream come true.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:25:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That sounds encouraging!

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:29:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's what I meant by let them make their bed and lie on it...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:48:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What I would say to the PP is that, with friends like these, who needs enemies?

By the time they stop digging themselves into a hole they will have made it to Auckland. (Sorry, Idiot Savant, it must suck to be our antipodes)

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:15:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They are making to assumtions that I hope are wrong leading them to dig on...

They count that the number of fascist (hard and soft) is around 30% and second, that they can make noise and leave again 10% of apathic left-wing voters (those that think politics is all shit, everything is rotten, nothing changes...and if they happen to go to vote.. they vote left)..

I hope they are wrong on both counts.. fascist is around 25 % and they are gonna leave as many center-right voters at home as center -left...with the extra of losing the center-I-alway vote or I -always-vote-the-winner  to Zapatero....with another extra-plus...noone to form any coalition if they do not win in a landslide.

I hope Auckland-Idiot Savant will receive them...soon. Do not be too hard on them IS

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:23:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I would put the fascists at 15% which makes for over 6M people and just under 5M adults.

When you think of the Spanish right as a mixture of post-francoists, christian democrats and liberals it's very difficult to know what to do about the christian democrats. If they are of the European variety they are natural allies of the liberals and the moderate right-wing nationalists, but if they are of the autoctonous and virulent Opus Dei strain they are natural allies of the post-francoists.

So maybe your 25% is consistent with my 15% by assuming 10% of the pathogenic Opus Dei strain of Christian Democrats.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:30:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually I was thinking in terms of voting..so our numbers are pretty similar..5M adults fascists going to vote...from the 10M PP gets. This is roughly the number I wanted 20-25 % of all total votes... they are hoping to get 6-7M on fascists..

I generally include Opus harliners on extreme-right.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:39:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My problem is that I don't want to assume that the majority of the CD are of the Opus Dei variety... But maybe I should since that would be the pessimistic thing to do.

In that case there's a potential for a 15% liberal centre-right party.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:42:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think there is a potential too.. I really hope so.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:55:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 
autoctonous

Migeru, thanks for the new vocabulary word. I had to look it up. I couldn't find it in my computer dictionary so I googled it. It appears that " autoctonous" is a common misspelling.

Fascinating topic, el mundo politico de Espana. Muchas gracias por el informacion.

autochthonous |ô?täk??n?s| adjective (of an inhabitant of a place) indigenous rather than descended from migrants or colonists. * Geology (of a deposit or formation) formed in its present position. Often contrasted with allochthonous .

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 02:09:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
By Jove, you're right!

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 02:54:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just struck me that the geological vocabulary is pretty pervasive when it ends up in a thread on politics of Spain...
by Nomad (Bjinse) on Sat Jan 28th, 2006 at 12:28:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Since the PP cannot force a referendum from parliament, they want to initiate a petition. The problem is that that is unconstitutional. The constitution says:
Wikisource: Constitución española de 1978
Artículo 87
  1. La iniciativa legislativa corresponde al Gobierno, al Congreso y al Senado, de acuerdo con la Constitución y los Reglamentos de las Cámaras.
  2. Las Asambleas de las Comunidades Autónomas podrán solicitar del Gobierno la adopción de un proyecto de ley o remitir a la Mesa del Congreso una proposición de ley, delegando ante dicha Cámara un máximo de tres miembros de la Asamblea encargados de su defensa.
  3. Una ley orgánica regulará las formas de ejercicio y requisitos de la iniciativa popular para la presentación de proposiciones de ley. En todo caso se exigirán no menos de 500.000 firmas acreditadas. No procederá dicha iniciativa en materias propias de ley orgánica, tributarias o de carácter internacional, ni en lo relativo a la prerrogativa de gracia.
In the vernacular:
87.3. An organic law shall regulate the requirements and forms of exercise of the people's initiative for the presentation of legal proposals. In any case no less than 500,000 accredited signatures will be required. Such an initiative shall not proceed in matters appropriate to an organic law, regarding taxation, or of an international character, nor on the power of pardon.
Since an autonomy statute is an Organic Law according to the constitution, it is against the constitution to organize a popular legislative initiative on the Catalan Statute. At least this is the argument that the govenrment is making,and I think it holds water.

By the way, an Organic Law ranks above all other laws except for the Constitution itself, which regulates which matters shall be regulated by an organic law.


A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:12:53 AM EST
The argument is completely right. Youc an not make a referendum on an organic law. ure and simple.

they can recollet signatures for fun or to show strength or whatever.. but  they cannot use it to ask for a referendum.

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:14:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The government can propose a referendum to the parliament on anything, that is true. But the way this is supposed to work is: the Catalan parliament approves a draft Statute (check!); a delegation of the Catalan parliament proposes it to the national parliament (check!); the national parliament approves a (possibly amended) final version of the Statute (working on that); the Catalan people vote it in a referendum. The PP has excluded itself from all the negotiations so far.

Since the Statute is an organic law, it is impossible for it to "change the constitution". The PP will certainly lodge an unconstitutionality complaint against it as soon as it is approved, and they are arguing that the law should be changed to allow pre-emptive unconstitutionality appeals before the law is approved (which is logically absurd: a final version of the law hasn't even been voted at that point!).

Now, if the PP manages to come up with, say, 5 million signatures (1/2 of their 2004 vote) demanding a national referendum we might have a legitimacy/constitutional crisis.

It would be the second time in 13 years than Aznar's entourage launches a no-holds-barred extraparliamentary campaign to destabilize a PSOE government, the stability of the state itself be damned.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:25:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Could someone shortly explain the Spanish order of names? I understand it is differentfrom the Indo-Germanic, Slavic and Hungarian/Chinese/Japanese order, but not exactly, and where is the placement of what for the English are "middle names"?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:26:03 AM EST
No middle names. Take

Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero.

Jose Luis is a composite first name.

Rodriguez Zapatero is his family name.

Rodriguez is his father's first name.

Zapatero is his mother's first name.

In Portugal they put the mother's name first, but they inherit the second name. In that context you could argue that the mother's name does function as a middle name, but that's not the case in Spanish.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 06:33:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow, a gender-neutral name inheritance! So there are no family names at all? What about wife names? And are composite first names inherited in full?

And when did this system form? Is it recent, or was it centuries ago under the arch-conservative Catholic monarchs?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 07:05:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, inheritance is only gender-neutral (and not fully) in the first generation: you cannot have a family name from one of your grandmothers.

I don't know what you mean by "no family names".

We don't have the concept of maiden names. Zapatero's wife, Sonsoles Espinosa, could call herself Sonsoles Espinosa señora de Rodriguez, but I doubt she does that. It's rancid.

Now, it is most common to just use your first (father's) family name informally but, as is the case with Zapatero, when the first name is extremely common (anything ending in -ez) and the second is uncommon the second is used.

The first name is not inherited: that's the given name or Christian name whether it's composite of single. My own name is Miguel but the composite Miguel Angel was much more common when I was a kid so everyone wrongly assumed I was Miguel Angel.

The whole system is very useful for genealogy: you always share a family name with every first cousin.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 07:14:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
For a fully gender-neutral scheme you would need boys to use the mother's name first,and girls to use the father's name first, with everyone passing on their first family name.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 07:21:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
By first name you mean his last name, don't you?

Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero.

Jose Luis is a composite first name.
----a----
Rodriguez Zapatero is his family name.
----b---  ---c----
Rodriguez is his father's first name.
---b----
Zapatero is his mother's first name.
---c----

Father

XXX XXX b c*

Mother

XXX XXX c d

Grandfather Father side
XXX XXX b c*
Grandmother Father side
XXX XXX c
c***

Grandfather Mother side
XXX XXX c e
Grandmother Mother side
XXX XXX d f

So you always have a set of three names. Your first name which is individual to you, your first part of the family name, which you get from your father and from the general paternal side.
and the second part of your family name which you get from your mothers paternal side.

Did I get that right?

by PeWi on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:09:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes.

By the way, is it possible to post a comment using fixed-width fonts? ASCII art comes in handy sometimes (as in your tagged underlining).

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:12:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]

This is a test.
        ^^
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:17:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Use < code></ code>, without the spaces.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:18:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]


This is so cool

---------------

by Alex in Toulouse on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:18:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It looks alright on my screen, but I know what you mean.

[http://www.htmlcodetutorial.com/characterentities_famsupp_69.html]
or

http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/sgml/entities.html

¤ as ampersand hash 164 semicolon
© ampersand hash 169 semicolon
ª ampersand hash 120 semicolon
« ampersand hash 171 semicolon

simply hardcodeing in the text box

this might help, did it?

by PeWi on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:20:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Apologies about the bold and I did make a mistake. It should be:

Grandfather Father side
XXX XXX b g
Grandmother Father side
XXX XXX c* c***

Grandfather Mother side
XXX XXX c e
Grandmother Mother side
XXX XXX d f

Parents both pass on their fathers first part of the family name onto their children as new family name.

by PeWi on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:13:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Which is where the gender asymmetry shows.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:15:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, I did mean "his father's first family name" and "his mother's first family name". You get into a lot of trouble with first and last.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:14:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah... thanks for the explanations you and PeWi anyway!

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 12:27:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm actually reading Tejero's piece carefully now and I think it won't be long before the King is forced to make a statement on this whole thing...

The King has to sign all laws anyway, remember that.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 08:54:54 AM EST
I imagine the King will be forced to speak too, just like in 1981.

The lasting hostility from the Franco era between liberal monarchists and the hard right Falanage sort of bleeds through on this.

Franco's attempt at La Mala Educacion of the future king is definitely a potential future diary.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 09:07:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
By the way, can you guess which famous political speech (and I mean famous) Tejero is borrowing his "Until when, Zapatero...?" (Hint: I think you have misplaced the ellipsis ;-)

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 09:10:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The reference eludes me.  I'm guessing something involving Pinochet...

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg
by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 11:50:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think it's Cicero's first Catilinaria, Quousque tandem abutere, Catilina, patientia nostra? (Until when, Catilina, will you abuse our patience?) I believe pretty much anyone educated in Spain over most of the 20th century (including me) has been exposed to this one-liner in a Latin course in secondary school. My latin teacher, who was an old francoist hag, was very fond of Cicero.

Tejero's style has definitely progressed from "Sit the fuck down!" (Se sienten, coño) when he stormed the Congress in 1981.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 28th, 2006 at 07:07:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Never heard of it.  

Latin classes are pretty much unheard of in most american schools (of the public variety.)

Tejero has definetly progressed, although that phrase "Sit the fuck down" is just so emblematic of the whole affair, the best part being if I remember right that this was broadcast live to a national audience.  Reality TV.....

It would make a great diary title though....... :)

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Sat Jan 28th, 2006 at 09:32:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I really think someone like Senator Byrd should start an address on the Senate floor with "Until when, Mr. Bush, will you abuse our patience?" and see who is the first pundit to catch the reference...

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 28th, 2006 at 02:19:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The opening salvo and expletive were indeed broadcast live as the occasion was an investiture session for a new Prime Minister (Calvo Soltelo, as Suarez had recently resigned). The interesting thing is that the rebels disconnected all the TV cameras except for one, and so there is a lot more footage than the rebels had expected.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 28th, 2006 at 06:04:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
El Pais: An association chaired by a PP cadre demands "filling the streets with resisting patriots"
"it will be necessary to fill the streets of Spain with resisting compatriots and that they do not resign themselves (...) There's no turning back. Tomorrow will be late". In an almost warlike tone and referring constantly to the reform of the Catalan Statute, Santiago Abascal, chairman of the Nuevas Generaciones (New Generations) of the PP in the Basque Country, presented yesterday the Foundation for the Defence of the Spanish Nation, not yet registered aas such, which he himself heads. The Ministry of Culture has rejected their application to be constituted as a Foundation on the grounds that its objectives coincide with those of the Ministry of Defence. For the moment, they are registered as an association.
Oh... My... God...

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 09:37:00 AM EST
At what point do they trot out the laws on sedition and start rounding them up? That's rapidly approaching incitement to riot.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 09:39:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They don't. Zapatero is all about (measured) demeanor. They just smile and hand them back their application with a "sorry, dude, you're supplanting the ministry of Defence".

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 09:47:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I like that attitude!
by Alexandra in WMass (alexandra_wmass[a|t]yahoo[d|o|t]fr) on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 04:47:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've found the web site for the group, and put in the link in an update above, check it out, it's a jewel.

I sincerely hope that these thugs get the same treatment that Batasuna has if somebody does something to "defend the unity of Spain"

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Sat Jan 28th, 2006 at 12:14:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You do realize Santiago Abascal is not only the president of Nuevas Generaciones in the basque Country, but also the spokesman for the PP's parliamentary group in the Basque Parliament...

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 28th, 2006 at 06:59:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, not quite. I must have gotten that from an old news item referring to another institution.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 28th, 2006 at 07:11:25 AM EST
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