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THE THIRD QUARTER REPORT

by SHKarlson Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 07:20:13 PM EST

THE THIRD QUARTER REPORT. I have added another thirteen books to the 2006 Fifty Book Challenge. First and second quarter reports are available in the April and July archives or at the Challenge site or on the European Tribune.


I am not optimistic about making the half-century by year's end.

    21.  Fish on Friday: Feasting, Fasting, and the Discovery of the New World, 10 July 2006.
    22.  Antitrust after Microsoft: The Obsolescence of Antitrust in the Digital Era, 20 July 2006.
    23.  Going Broke by Degree: Why College Costs too Much, 3 August 2006.
    24.  White Guilt, 6 August 2006.
    25.  Behind the Crumbling Edge, 7 August 2006.
    26.  Wal-Mart: The Face of Twenty-First-Century Capitalism, 25 August 2006.
    27.  Midway Magic, 3 September 2006.
    28.  Civil War Battlefields: Discovering America's Hallowed Ground, 4 September 2006.
    29.  The Changing Face of Britain's Railways 1938-1953: The Railway Companies Bow Out, 6 September 2006.
    30.  The Afghan, 8 September 2006.
    31.  Main Lines, 9 September 2006.
    32.  Tannenberg 1410/1914, 14 September 2006.
    33.  The Iraq War, 29 September 2006.
(Cross-posted at Cold Spring Shops and at the Fifty Book Challenge.)

The bookworm has some more segments.

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I'm not sure I really understand the concept.  Simply to read 50 books in a year?  Is this something like library programs for kids that give them prizes for reading the most books?  Because I always disliked those.  Kids would check out picture books and I'd spend the better part of the summer pouring over Jane Eyre or something, and guess who got the prize...  

Can I turn this into a "What are you reading?" thread?  Because I have found 2 new books I really want to read:

1. Passionate Minds: The Great Enlightenment Love Affair.
About Voltaire and Emilie du Chatelet.

2. Love and Louis XIV: The Women in the Life of the Sun King.
Rather speaks for itself...

Also, Matthew's just finished Mrs. Dalloway, which I've tried to get into before, but with no success.  I really can't stand her writing.  I know, it is terrible.  But he liked it and is now convinced that I dislike Virginia Woolf because I am so much like her (personal histories have many parallels).  So I'm determined to give it another go.


Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 07:40:38 PM EST
Did you see the movie The Hours and/or read the book? I liked the movie so much that I bought and read the book, which I liked less.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 07:47:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I loved the movie.  I really loved it, though I didn't think Nicole Kidman's performance lived up to the hype.  The book that you liked less, is that The Hours, or Mrs. Dalloway?

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire
by p------- on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 08:24:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I actually though Kidman was great, but I don't read many movie reviews, so I may not have gotten the hype... But I am also partial to Ed Harris and Meryl Streep. The book I meant is The Hours, I still didn't feel any interest in Mrs. Dalloway. Part of the problem with The Hours (the book) is that the character of the 50's mother makes even less sense to me than in the movie.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 17th, 2006 at 08:29:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the character of the 50's mother makes even less sense to me than in the movie

Wow. That shows just how different perceptions can be.

I found that vivid evocation of an era which offered people virtually no alternative life choices - particularly for women. What must it feel like to live in such a world, and to realize one doesn't fit?

The 50's mother could either kill herself or read Mrs. Dalloway, and either choice would be inappropriate. I found that very powerful.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Oct 18th, 2006 at 08:48:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh god, Kidman was awful in that movie! Portraying a complicated character like Virginia Woolf as a depressive autistic may be many things, but good acting it is not. I thought Juliana Moore's performance was fantastic, though.

I read the The Hours first, and that prompted me to read Mrs. Dalloway. The latter I found less "fun", but still a fascinating piece of writing.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Oct 18th, 2006 at 08:42:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe I just can't stand Julianne Moore ;-)

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 18th, 2006 at 09:03:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nor I Kidman. Talk about sharing amicably! ;-)

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Oct 18th, 2006 at 09:35:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I generally can't stand Kidman, except that in a very short period of time she delivered The Hours and The Others, both of which I liked.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 18th, 2006 at 09:49:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The person who set up the 50 Book Challenge at Live Journal noted in his ground rules that it was simply to encourage people to read and tell others what they'd been reading.  The "fifty" is simply a round number.  There are no prizes for claiming fifty or for claiming (as some members of that community are doing) a reading list into the hundreds.

I have a few standards for my postings.  The book has to be worthy of a review, meaning it must have enough intellectual content to challenge an adolescent.  That rules out basal readers and train-spotter picture books (I could rack up hundreds claiming the latter!)  Goes back to my youth, when my teachers and my parents held me to similar standards.

If my guests want to discuss their favorite recent books and movies, by all means go ahead.  Thanks for looking in.

Stephen Karlson ATTITUDE is a nine letter word. BOATSPEED.

by SHKarlson (shkarlson at frontier dot com) on Wed Oct 18th, 2006 at 12:26:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I wrote up my list for the year so far a few days ago, I'm at 17 at the moment. In my serious bookworm days I was probably reading 35 books a year. I can't speed read like some of you crazies.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Wed Oct 18th, 2006 at 01:24:46 PM EST


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