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US posted Iraqi documents on making nuclear bomb on Internet:

by oldfrog Fri Nov 3rd, 2006 at 02:39:03 PM EST


WASHINGTON (AFP) - The US government posted on the Internet Iraqi documents that explain how to build a nuclear bomb, the New York Times reported on its website.

The Times said that officials from the        International Atomic Energy Agency had complained to US officials last week about the postings of "roughly a dozen" documents from        Iraq's pre-1991 nuclear research that contained diagrams, equations and other details for making a nuclear bomb.

The Times cited experts who said the documents "constitute a basic guide to building an atom bomb."

The US government posted the bomb-related documents on a website set up last March to make available to the public a huge archive of Iraqi government papers, hoping that the public would help sift through the archive for useful information government translators did not have time to search for.

The Times said that earlier in the year UN arms control officials had complained about documents on the website that had information on producing extremely dangerous nerve agents sarin and tabun.

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20061103/wl_afp/usiraqnuclearinternet_061103072358

the rethorical question is : is there a limit for the current administration stupidity ?


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hoping that the public would help sift through the archive for useful information government translators did not have time to search for.

So not only did they post Atomic bomb designs on the internet, They posted them on the internet in ARABIC!

When the democrats do take over the whitehouse, the first week is going to be spent taking down all the don't run with scisors signs, they really really aren't the sharpest knives in the box.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Nov 4th, 2006 at 05:01:47 PM EST
Here's what blows my mind the most:

The campaign for the Web site was led by the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Representative Peter Hoekstra of Michigan. Last November, he and his Senate counterpart, Pat Roberts of Kansas, wrote to Mr. Negroponte, asking him to post the Iraqi material. The sheer volume of the documents, they argued, had overwhelmed the intelligence community.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/03/world/middleeast/03cnd-documents.html

Why on earth would the chairs of the Senate Committee on Intelligence and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence want to put these documents on the web?

Is this their idea of implementing open source intelligence?

Rien ne réussit comme le succès.

by marco on Sun Nov 5th, 2006 at 12:25:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The campaign for the online archive was mounted by conservative publications and politicians, who said that the nation's spy agencies had failed adequately to analyze the 48,000 boxes of documents seized since the March 2003 invasion. With the public increasingly skeptical about the rationale and conduct of the war, the chairmen of the House and Senate intelligence committees argued that wide analysis and translation of the documents -- most of them in Arabic -- would reinvigorate the search for clues that Mr. Hussein had resumed his unconventional arms programs in the years before the invasion. American search teams never found such evidence.

"U.S. Web Archive Is Said to Reveal a Nuclear Primer", New York Times

If those fools are so eager to post "very sensitive, much of it undoubtedly secret restricted data" up on ther Internet to enable "wide analysis" by the public to "reinvigorate the search for clues", why don't they start having Congressional hearings so the public can participate in a "wide analysis" of the testimony of Russ Tice and Sibel Edmonds?

Rien ne réussit comme le succès.

by marco on Sun Nov 5th, 2006 at 12:41:36 AM EST
The campaign for the online archive was mounted by conservative publications and politicians, who said that the nation's spy agencies had failed adequately to analyze the 48,000 boxes of documents seized since the March 2003 invasion.

The problem with these people is their impatience. How long do they think it's going to take to translate and analyse 48,000 boxes of documents, especially if the staff has to be vetted.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 5th, 2006 at 03:22:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It was my dumbfuck congressman that suggested this.

From an article this Spring in the conservative Weekly Standard.

[Rep. Mike] Pence framed his response as a question, quoting Abraham Lincoln: "One of your Republican predecessors said, 'Give the people the facts and the Republic will be saved.' There are 3,000 hours of Saddam tapes and millions of pages of other documents that we captured after the war. When will the American public get to see this information?"

Bush replied that he wanted the documents released. He turned to Hadley and asked for an update. Hadley explained that John Negroponte, Bush's Director of National Intelligence, "owns the documents" and that DNI lawyers were deciding how they might be handled.

Bush extended his arms in exasperation and worried aloud that people who see the documents in 10 years will wonder why they weren't released sooner. "If I knew then what I know now," Bush said in the voice of a war skeptic, "I would have been more supportive of the war."

Bush told Hadley to expedite the release of the Iraq documents. "This stuff ought to be out. Put this stuff out." The president would reiterate this point before the meeting adjourned. And as the briefing ended, he approached Pence, poked a finger in the congressman's chest, and thanked him for raising the issue. When Pence began to restate his view that the documents should be released, Bush put his hand up, as if to say, "I hear you. It will be taken care of."

The people back home have been fooled into electing this dumbfuck to Congress 3 times now. Needless to say I don't think that releasing documents about how to build an atomic bomb (in Arabic no less) onto the internet is going to play well back home.

The issue now is whether this infromation will reach the gerneral public in time to influence the election.  So far it's been looked over at Kos.  

Damn shame too, because I saw this dumbfuck announce to a crowd of people that he had information that he couldn't divulge the source of that the people who captured Abu Zubaydah had  "picks in the NCAA tournament."  

One problem, the official US position is that Pakastani intelligence captured Zubaydah in 2002.  Either Pence didn't know what he was talking about, or he released classified information obtained in his role as a member of the House Select Intelligence Committee.

I seriously hate this motherfucker, what I've mentioned is merely the start.  I've been building a file against Pence for 4 years now, and it's damn full.  This one though tops off the rest.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Sun Nov 5th, 2006 at 03:49:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
When I first read the article, it immediately occurred to me that Senator Roberts and Rep. Hoekstra should be impeached.  Now that I read your citation, I see that Bush was just as if not more guilty of this gross negligence.

This story illustrates the fact that sometimes confidentiality is critical for national -- and world -- security.  What is enraging is that the administration uses confidentiality when security is not at stake, and yet confidentiality is very politically expedient (another example is the non-disclosure of Tenet's July 2001 meeting with Rice, exposed in Woodward's recent book State of Denial.)

And precisely when security can be gravely compromised, the administration -- Bush himself, it seems, goaded by your idiot Congressman -- decides to forget about national security altogether on the faintest hope that a needle of evidence that Saddam Hussein had a nuclear program could be uncovered in the haystack of 48,000 boxes of documents, and thereby salvage the historical legacy of this war.

The issue now is whether this infromation will reach the gerneral public in time to influence the election.  So far it's been looked over at Kos.

I can't watch U.S. television, so I don't know how much coverage this issue is getting.  But from reading online news, it looks like it's not.  What a shame.

Rien ne réussit comme le succès.

by marco on Sun Nov 5th, 2006 at 06:08:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
US government puts instructions in arabic on how to make an atomic bomb on the internet. Claims this will fight terrorism and make Americans more secure.

<head explodes>

Give these people a fair trial and then have them executed.

Or at least strip them of their office and intern them at Guantanamo as they are obviously a direct threat to national security.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Sun Nov 5th, 2006 at 08:26:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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