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Contrat Premičre Embūche

by Jerome a Paris Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:24:29 PM EST

Today's demonstrations against the CPE appear to have been a big success, with several hundred thousand students in the streets all over France, despite a few local episodes of violence. Saturday, the students will be joined by workers' unions in another big day of demonstrations, and the goal is to reach one and a half million people in the streets.

I hope that others will pitch in with their testimony and bits of news, but I wanted to summarise what was said in Le Canard Enchaīné yesterday, which provides insider glimpses of what the politicians are thinking. It's not pretty.

Here it is, in random order:


  • Chirac, as usual, is clueless. Until Monday, he was saying "it's the government's problem, let villepin handle it. Since Monday, he has felt the need to support his prime minister, but everybody knows that Chirac has always capitulated against students (he did in 1986, in 1994, in 1995;

  • Villepin alternates between demonstrations of toughness ("Balladur (who gave in on a similar contract in 1994) had no balls. I do, and I'll fight to the end. It's like during WWI in the trenches. We must not let anything go") and tiredness ("beyond 1.5 m demonstrators, we cannot hold");

  • Sarkozy alternates between glee that Villepin is about to humiliate himself ("the French are against it, the Ministers are against it, MPs are against. Villepin is isolated, and if the demonstrations are strong, he will be forced to capitulate) and worry that the fallout will catch him, along with the whole right-wing majority. He is also particularly worried about a potential hook up between students and banlieues kids (which seems partly under way), and by risks of violence. Both he (as minister for the interior) and Villepin have given strict insturctions to the police to keep their calm;

  • many in the majority are deeply reluctant, fearing a major break up with youth (several have noted that the simultaneity with the internet copyright debate is terrible, and say that thye are receiving unprecedented numbers of emails about that topic from "internautes"). They feel obliged to support Villepin ("like the rope supports the hanging man" said one) and hold ranks, but several have already expressed deep misgivings and asked Villepin to drop the text.

  • there is, as usual, infighting between the left and the hardleft to try to control the movement, but it seems to be self-organised to a large extent, and beyond the grasp of organised political movements. The left has been vocal in its opposition of the plan, but it's not sure that it will be able to benefit from the student movement;

  • more generally, there is a feeling that the French youth are deeply unhappy with a number of things (there are many, many different grievances that have come up and given strength to the overall protests), and in particular the fear that they are being sacrificed (once more) by society;

  • there appears to be growing support from the banlieues for the movement. some have tried to caricature it as an "elites" fighting for their privileges against the lower classes youth, but these are saying that they don't see how more precarity will help them. This is still fluid, but an increasing number of high schools are joining the movement (Le Monde states that 32 of Paris' 100 high schools were closed today by protests).

  • unions, which had waited to see if the student protests had any energy in them, are now fully supportive, and organising Saturday's big demonstrations. Villepin is trying to save his law by announcing "negotiated adjustments", but all unions have stated flatly that they would negotiate only after the 2-year trial period and the right to fire people without cause were dropped. They see Villepin upping that stakes, and are looking forward to him falling from even higher...

    The movement is now becoming a major social moment, and the current government is unlikely to stay unscathed. In a sense, the question is whether Villepin will take Sarkozy and Chirac wiht him, or if he will be destroyed alone. His chances of surviving the crisis appear slim today, and there's a good chance that the right could be nastily tainted. The big worry is that this brings a full year of disorder, which could paly into Le Pen's hands. The situation is very fluid and the stakes are getting steadily higher.

    The good news is that collective protests and resistance work.

Display:
CPE = Contrat Première Embauche ('First Hire' Contract)
Contrat Première Embûche = first trap contract

This was actually said by Villepin on TV a few days ago.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:26:03 PM EST
Great title too bad there isn't the Villepin sound bite to go with it.
by Alexandra in WMass (alexandra_wmass[a|t]yahoo[d|o|t]fr) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:36:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Jerome,

I'm not following that stuff in detail. Can you explain that part?
Sarkozy [snip] is also particularly worried about a potential hook up between students and banlieues kids (which seems partly under way), and by risks of violence. Both he (as minister for the interior) and Villepin have given strict insturctions to the police to keep their calm;

A convergence between la banlieux and students seems pretty far fetch.

And, if I was Sarkozy, I'd be very happy to see "la racaille" mess up with students demonstrations the same they did last year with the lycéens' demos against the Fillon plan. The violence poured a big bucket of cold water on the lycéens movement. The CRS were very happy and didn't move a finger then.
by Francois in Paris on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:26:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sarkozy's worry seems to me to be that he may be identified by middle-class voters as the head of the police that whack their kids over the head.

Last night, after incidents in the Latin Quarter (lol, I always love the sound of that), he was very careful and uncharacteristically diplomatic in making clear that violence was carried out by extremists (right and left) and "hooligans", and had nothing to do with the demonstration, which had gone off without a hitch. And that he had given instructions to the police not to attack genuine student demonstrators because of provocateurs mixed in with them, etc.

The worry of a link-up between students and the banlieues seems to me to be based on that: if middle-class kids join underclass kids in burning cars, how will Sarko avoid nasty fallout for the middle-class kids and a bad image for him with the conservative electorate? It's all the difference between trawling for votes far to the right by shitting on underclass youth, and looking after the kids of his core electorate.

As to the possibility of a link-up, it's not entirely far-fetched. It seems there's no essential difference of view between the students and the banlieue kids about the CPE. Neither group sees the move toward liberalization of the labour market as a good thing for them. Secondly, there's some intersection between the groups, especially at high-school level. Many of the underclass kids are school drop-outs, most are not. The more successful of them go on to university studies. Communication between the two groups is therefore possible.

Anyway, my feeling on hearing Sarkozy's comments in the Latin Quarter late last night was that he was "walking on eggs".

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 01:14:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's in today's FT:


Students support France's disaffected youth

Hostility to the contract from people in the poor suburbs is a blow to Dominique de Villepin, the prime minister, who claimed last weekend that the measure was designed to help "the young people in most difficulty".

Mr de Villepin seemed to be telling the student protesters in central Paris not to worry. As graduates of prestigious universities, such as the Sorbonne, they are not the intended recipients of the new contract. Instead, it is meant for the poorly-educated immigrant children in "les banlieues", who rioted and set fire to thousands of cars and buildings across France last year.

But this argument is being undermined by an increasing number of people in the suburbs repeating the same criticisms as the student demonstrators. The only difference is that people in the poor outer-city ghettos say they have the added worry of racial discrimination.

Edilson Monteiro, an 18-year-old school drop-out from Montfermeil, says: "Before the `first job contract', there were enough difficulties for people from the banlieues, with the difference in our clothes, our language and our culture, but now they are making things even more insecure.

"Young people are very worried about entering the world of work. Now if I make a mistake or upset the boss, he can just get rid of me without any reason," says Edilson, whose mother brought him to the local job centre after he quit as a construction sales agent.

Now he plans to retrain as a cook's assistant in a six-month paid training scheme, which if he passes, will lead to a full-time contract. He would refuse a "first job contract" if offered one. "Two years is too long. I'm with the demonstrators on that."

Many people have a deep distrust of company bosses, and suspect they are looking for any excuse to fire black or Arab workers.

And even on their front page:


French PM appeals for calm over labour reforms

Mr de Villepin's claim that the policy would help those "most in difficulty" is increasingly undermined by growing opposition from unemployed youths in poor suburbs.Young people in Clichy-sous-Bois, the run-down Paris suburb where last year's riots started, almost unanimously opposed the contract in interviews with the Financial Times this week. Many claimed they would turn down a job if offered one of the new contracts.

Most criticisms focused on the length of the trial period and the added insecurity it would bring. However, their hostility was also tinged with suspicions that it would give company bosses another way to discriminate against racial minorities. "If your head does not please the boss, that's it, you're finished," said Dapton, 21, an unemployed accountancy graduate at Aulnay-sous-Bois. Diabira Adama, 26, an unemployed computer technician queuing at a job centre in Clichy-sous-Bois, said: "It is totally unacceptable . . . it's great they are demonstrating in Paris."




In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 03:20:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And they actually note, in colcusion of their article, the most important point:


Most people seem to agree with Marie-Ange Bernard, a 30-year-old unemployed social worker from Aulnay-sous-Bois, who says the contract is "a nonsense" as it would not be accepted by banks or landlords as a sufficiently secure source of income to get a flat or a bank loan. "Without a full-time contract in France you cannot get an apartment, a loan, or anything."


In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 03:58:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The government argues that the CPE gives youths a guarantee for flats, but in fact he's referring to "Locapass" which is anyhow already available for under-30 people.

The thing is, many rental agencies ask for more guarantees even when they see "Locapass", or so I have been told. This depends on the agency, I suppose.

And between a youth with a CDI and Locapass, and a youth with a CPE and Locapass, who will the agency choose?

Also, Locapass only covers you for 18 months, and the CPE is 24 months AND can be renewed several times until you're 26 (24 + 24 + 24 ...).

The issue of loans however remains intact ... I can't imagine a bank being generous with a CPE.

by Alex in Toulouse on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 09:00:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He dared to say that ?? Is that man totally immune to any sense of decency ?

For record purposes, previous diaries on the topic

French job laws and young worker unrest

How the French government aims at outdoing Reagan and Thatcher

Latest update : a 2 year probation period for everyone now ?

When through hell, just keep going. W. Churchill

by Agnes a Paris on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 04:07:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
C'était un lapsus révelateur...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 04:44:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]


In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:30:07 PM EST
I've been saying this a few times, but I will be going for picture-taking on Saturday, which I hope to link to here afterwards (ie "hope" because I won't put them if they're only the dying pictures of my camera smashed out under the boot of a policeman)
by Alex in Toulouse on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:38:10 PM EST
Well, I've photographed a few disturbances in my time and my camera has been my life at that moment, so a few tips:

a) If you're adventurous, try approaching from the side, or even going around the back, you can really get some great shots.

b) Tie some rags around your camera to absorb some random blows and also reduce the attention it attracts. Gaffer tape can also help to make it less attention grabbing.

c) If you're using an SLR, lens hoods and a clear filter are a good precaution to protect the lens from flying objects.

d) Onions can help with tear gas a bit, obviously cloth and masks can be good too, but they may attract unwanted attention.

e) Find a position near a wall, to protect one side of you, stay low and if possible drag along a friend to watch your back. (Back to back is often good for photos for both.)

f) Be prepared to have to wait out the disturbance, more photogs get injured trying to leave in the middle because of deadline than whilst actually shooting pictures.

g) Your reaction to the police will be largely determined by their attitude. I know you Alex are going along as an independent, so it's most likely they will be hostile. Try to stay a little bit away from the front line, ready to run even, because if they catch you they will probably want to smash the camera. (Ironically, film was in good thing in this case, shoot a few, change rolls and hide the roll on your person.) If your camera is small enough and they catch up with you, try to hide it on you. Into the underpants is a good bet if you wear loose trousers. Once, doing so protected my vulnerables from a swift kick, which was a lucky trick.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:28:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for all this great info Metatone!!!

I can address some of your points:

a) I've been in front of a row of charging riot police once in my life (accidentally, there were some riots At Les Halles in Paris at night and I just happened to walk through unaware of it) and I moonwalked out of there at full speed. So I will definitely avoid being too frontal.

b) I've decided to opt for a tiny pocket digital in order to be able to quickly pocket it. The pictures won't be great on the other hand.

d) I wear contact lenses so tear gas won't affect me as much (I know it sounds weird but lenses collect a lot of the stingy stuff on their surface and it thus doesn't hit your eye)

e) and f) are good advice, particularly f) is important, I'll keep it in mind at all times

by Alex in Toulouse on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:54:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One important note however:
Since there are 3 rugby matches in the afternoon, I'll be leaving before the end of the demonstration, and that's generally when the shit hits the fan so I think it'll all be ok and the pictures I'll post here will only be pictures of youths having fun ;)
by Alex in Toulouse on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:57:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh? Off to watch the Catalans Dragons? ;-)
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 07:07:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ahhh! Ohhhh! Young man I demand an explanation for this repeated reference to Rugby League.
by Alex in Toulouse on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 07:09:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I might make it to a home game this season, which would put me close to your neck of the woods...
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 07:15:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I just now saw this.  I was thinking a march or something and the thought of things descending into actual riots and brutality hadn't occurred to me until I read Metatone's great advice.

With that in mind, this old, scarred veteran of more than a few riots in L.A. only has this to add -- don't ignore the cloth advice!  Listen to Metatone!  Wait, that's not adding anything, it's nagging... sorry.  Okay, take a bottle of water if you can, both to flush your eyes (contacts can only do so much) or to wet the cloth with and breathe through.  

Also, if there's a chance you might end up in jail, write an emergency phone number on your forearm in ink.  It's difficult to remember numbers in these situations, even if you know them well.  One last thing -- BE CAREFUL!  I'll look forward to seeing your photos.  Let us know when you're back safe!

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes

by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 07:34:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If shit hits the fan(s), and I find myself in front of a police charge, I'll immediately turn my coat and go "bouuuuu look at these immoral youths bouuuu" and discretely moonwalk out of there.
by Alex in Toulouse on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 08:04:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Okay, so long as you bear in mind that that's what everybody thinks.  In my experience, the immoral youth usually scooted away moments before the innocent bystanders got walloped.  Just sayin'...

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 08:25:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In your blue Hawaian shirt, pretend to be a tourist looking for the beach.

Alex: "Mais où est la plage, s'il vous plaît?"

CRS: "Sous les pavés, connard!"

"Where is the beach, please?"
"Under the paving-stones, asshole!"

(Allusion to May '68 slogan, "Sous les pavés, la plage": "Under the paving-stones, the beach", allusion in its turn to the expanses of sand found beneath the paving-stones prised up to be used as missiles, er, paperweights).

(I'd like to draw this scene, but I'm not Cabu).

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 02:05:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Pardon my ignorance, but considering the apparent incompetence of the current French government, is there any reason the right wing keeps getting re-elected there? Is this a case of people having short-term memory, or are the French right-wingers different from the others? Or is it the fact that the left is just in shambles?

Thanks.

Mikhail from SF

by Tsarrio (dj_tsar@yahoo.com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:41:54 PM EST
The left has governed for 15 of the last 25 years.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:43:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
1981-86 President: Mitterrand, PMs Mauroy and Fabius)
1988-93 President Mitterrand, PMs Rocard, Cresson, Beregovoy
1997-2002: President Chirac, PM Jospin

The party that wins the legislative elections governs, thus usually for 5 years. When a new president is elected, he can dissolve parliament and until now alwyas gets a majority on the same side as himself. when the president was elected for 7 years, the 5 year vote was often hostile to those in power, and you'd have "cohabitation" of the president from one camp and the government from the other. In 1995, Chirac kept the parliament from 1993. He decidedto dissolve parliament in 1997, one year early, and unexpectedly lost, thus leading to 5 years under Jospin. The right won both the presidential and the parliamentary elections in 2002 and has been governing since.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:50:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sarko keeps himself out of this issue. The Right could re-group around him.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:44:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He can't. The last poll (last Sunday) showed that his favorability ratings has dropped more than those of Villepin. He's still part of the government, and he is still part of the right who has all the levers of power. He is tainted.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:13:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lets just hope it stays that way.
by Alexandra in WMass (alexandra_wmass[a|t]yahoo[d|o|t]fr) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:15:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hooray!!!

Link?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:19:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The big worry is that this brings a full year of disorder, which could paly into Le Pen's hands.

Where is FN in the polls now?

(By the way, any good link to a French poll-summarizing site, one like pollingreport.com for the USA?)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 05:43:23 PM EST
The group that does a lot of the polls that are published in French papers is TNS-SOFRES. Their web site has a section on politics and elections (2nd left hand menu item) under which you can find polls about political candidates and parities as well as polls on policy issues etc... The FN political party polls are in the political party section: http://www.php.sofres.com/cote3 . So far this year (2006) 10 to 11% of poll respondents had a favourable opinion of the FN and 79 to 80 had a negative opinion of the FN.
by Alexandra in WMass (alexandra_wmass[a|t]yahoo[d|o|t]fr) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:13:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Le Pen cartoon bounce: back to 14-15% from 10%. What you linked for parties is apparently favorable opinion, not voter intention - funny enough that it is still below that of Le Pen's.

Their current poll, asking about "important role to play" rather than sympathy, has Villepin 36% (-7%), Sarko 44% (-8%). And Laguiller 23%.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:54:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Le Pen cartoon bounce

I'm outta my mind, confusing timelines. It was a 'riots' bounce actually, and the cartoons had no noticeable effect (but maybe the cartoons headed off a post-'riots' slump in le Pen's numbers).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 04:32:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's the monthly poll from Journal du Dimanche (with IFOP).

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:15:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's the full report from IFOP for March. In French with tables towards the end of the report.
by Alexandra in WMass (alexandra_wmass[a|t]yahoo[d|o|t]fr) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:19:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
26% of leftists would take Sarko above Jospin? What kind of idiots are that?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:25:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hee Hee => see here  ;)
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 01:28:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hehehehe... I see I'll have to double-check what I'd say to prevent another big fight on ET :-)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 04:29:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
IFOP?

Probably only Izzy will understand why my first thought was "International Family of Pancakes."

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:33:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ahahahaha!  Thanks for the laugh!  :-)

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:55:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Some to me startling symphaty numbers:

Arlette Laguiller 58% (+5)
(Wasn't the consensus here that she's sectarian-personal-cultist lunatic-left? And why the significant increase?)

José Bové 54% (+2)
(That's pretty mainstream-approval, too)

Lionel Jospin 51% (-4)
(Why the significant drop?)

Jean-Luc Mélenchon 18 (-1)
(Who's this guy 'outdoing' the Le Pens?)

As for Villepin and Sarko, in this poll, Sarko is unchaged at 56% but Villepin crashed 11% to 51%...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:35:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Arlette Laguiller: she represents a sectarian, secretive Trotskyist party called Lutte Ouvrière. But she's a popular figure in France. She has been a candidate at every presidential since 1974. Her image is: she used to be a bank clerk, she's a nice, ordinary, reassuring working-to-lower-middle-class Frenchwoman who may well still drive around in a Deux Chevaux or on a moped.

José Bové is another very popular leftie. His stand on food quality speaks to (many) French hearts. If the main parties had people of the charisma and capabilities of Bové instead of the horror show they've actually got, they'd clean up.

Mélenchon (not to be confused with Melanchthon ;)) is on the left of the PS, a main figure in the "non" movement with Fabius.

The changes in sympathy, I don't know, except that, at the moment with a social movement under way, the main parties lose points that the fringes pick up (? conjecture).

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 01:52:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Mélenchon (not to be confused with Melanchthon ;)) is on the left of the PS, a main figure in the "non" movement with Fabius.

And why is he so strongly unpopular?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 04:30:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He's a second-stringer. Little face or name recognition.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 09:24:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Laguiller is batshit crazy, but she is seen as consistent and honest (although I doubt most people really know what's in her programme)

She was also made popular by her puppet in Les Guignols de l'Info, the popular satirical show (which was extremely influential in the mid-90s), which focused on her tireless, selfless, campaigning for "workers" ("travailleurs, travailleuses").

She was elected to the European Parliament in 1999, and her group ended up killing a law that would have improved workers' rights. The argument was that anythign that improves workers' right is a balm that needlessly delays revolution. Really.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 10:31:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Her's a poll form JDD back in Janaury on the CPE (the question was: will the CPE  (i) increase precarity or (ii) reduce youth unemployment)

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Mar 16th, 2006 at 06:18:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A poll this morning for Le Parisien/i-Télé gives 68% of French against the CPE, up from 55% a week ago. (63% say they support the student movement).

Well over two-thirds against the CPE, almost two-thirds support the students. The question now is:

How long before Chirac realizes he must pull the plug?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 01:37:48 AM EST
"How long before Chirac realizes he must pull the plug? "

I think it's starting:

Le président Jacques Chirac a réaffirmé vendredi que le gouvernement était "prêt au dialogue" sur le contrat première embauche (CPE) et il a souhaité que "celui-ci s'ouvre au plus vite"

The president Jacques Chirac re-emphacized on Friday that the government was "ready for dialogue" on the CPE contract and he would like that "it starts as soon as possible"

source: Le Monde


by Alexandra in WMass (alexandra_wmass[a|t]yahoo[d|o|t]fr) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 08:55:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
link to today's article in the Financial Times
French PM appeals for calm over labour reforms
and some significant extracts

Mr de Villepin's claim that the policy would help those "most in difficulty" is increasingly undermined by growing opposition from unemployed youths in poor suburbs.Young people in Clichy-sous-Bois, the run-down Paris suburb where last year's riots started, almost unanimously opposed the contract in interviews with the Financial Times this week. Many claimed they would turn down a job if offered one of the new contracts.

For once this is interesting...

Most criticisms focused on the length of the trial period and the added insecurity it would bring. However, their hostility was also tinged with suspicions that it would give company bosses another way to discriminate against racial minorities. "If your head does not please the boss, that's it, you're finished," said Dapton, 21, an unemployed accountancy graduate at Aulnay-sous-Bois. Diabira Adama, 26, an unemployed computer technician queuing at a job centre in Clichy-sous-Bois, said: "It is totally unacceptable . . . it's great they are demonstrating in Paris."

With that I do agree.

When through hell, just keep going. W. Churchill

by Agnes a Paris on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 05:46:09 AM EST
(This was already quoted near the top of the thread)

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 10:27:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Better say, to remain politically correct, "this was already quoted earlier on". "Near the top of the thread" suggests that your quote is more important than mine, if I were very touchy, that is.<s> Just joking.
You will not have missed that the two extracts I picked up are the same as some of yours. I think it is better to stick to small extracts, we already get a lot of press news from the press review.
Very interesting to convey Le Canard Enchaîné info, which cannot be quoted in literal form. That is very valuable, thank you.  

When through hell, just keep going. W. Churchill
by Agnes a Paris on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 10:54:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Better say, to remain politically correct, "this was already quoted earlier on". "Near the top of the thread" suggests that your quote is more important than mine, if I were very touchy, that is.<s> Just joking.
You will not have missed that the two extracts I picked up are the same as some of yours. I think it is better to stick to small extracts, we already get a lot of press news from the press review.
Very interesting to convey Le Canard Enchaîné info, which cannot be quoted in literal form. That is very valuable, thank you.  

When through hell, just keep going. W. Churchill
by Agnes a Paris on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 10:56:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is slightly off-topic but does anyone know how French polls actually survey popularity? Are respondents asked, as in the US, to rate the individual on "favorable," "unfavorable" or to rate the job performance as "excellent, good, fair, poor"? Or something else?

I'm always suspicious of the attention paid in the media to what seem to me very insignificant statistical shifts (such as the -4 for Jospin noted above).

by desmoulins (gsb6@lycos.com) on Sat Mar 18th, 2006 at 02:52:14 AM EST


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