Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

LondonMeet Shoe Blogging

by ThatBritGuy Sun Aug 20th, 2006 at 08:17:08 PM EST

...with some political discussions too, as a footnote.

Saturday morning saw the usual suspects (except for Migeru, who was late) meeting in the sunny/rainy/windy/showery location of upscale Knightsbridge tube station, suspiciously close to the Westminster no-protest zone.

A minor comedy moment with half of the party waiting upstairs, while the other half waited downstairs, didn't dampen our enthusiasm. After assembling the troops we marched to Wagamama, covert noodle temple of Pastafarianism, for lunch. (Or, in my case, breakfast.)


Digital documentation abounded. Here you can see Helen, Northsylvania, the back of Sam's head, the side of Colman's head, the back of Metatone's head, and some of Migeru's head. And back.


Duelling cameras became a fixture of the rest of the day.


But there was political discussion too. In fact we started just after mid-day and finished at 11pm, and continued more or less without a break between those times.


After Wagamama, we settled at the Star - one of those London pubs that looks like it hasn't changed since 1940. We were loud enough that at this point people were taking photos of us. I watched a miserable-looking Tory-type glowering at our politics from a dark corner. I suspect we're now all on file somewhere in the MI6 HQ for potentially seditious activities. Even more suspiciously the scowling Tory grandee was replaced by an enthusiastic photographer with an SLR. There were some old duffers playing chess too - just like a spy movie. Hmmm - clear evidence of a conspiracy.


Naturally there was beer, but you'll have to ask Helen about that.



ET shoeblogging revealed! Clockwise from bottom left - Sam, Colman, Migeru and Metatone.


rg explained that once upon a time he'd studied Physical Geography, and still had footwear to match.


Helen added a note of pink, while Northsylvania settled for more conventional black.


As did your humble correspondent, with this fine pair of 'What do you mean it's time for a new pair? I've only worn them every day for three years' man-boots.

The Star gave way to a walk around Hyde Park. rg and I expressed solidarity with both cows and political economics by having ice creams - in fact a peculiarly English ice cream called a 99.

Helen now persuaded us to move to The White Horse in Fulham...


...with a slightly younger and louder demographic than our previous venue.


As is traditional, lemons were ritually eviscerated, and in this case drowned. (Even though pancakes weren't available - a near-apocalyptic culinary oversight.)


While the cabal hunkered down to discuss a hostile takeover of News International...


...I experimented with turning inside close-ups of a gourmet crisp packet into abstract art. Migeru and rg played Backgammon, and a peculiar paper-based version of Go with an apparently arbitrary board size.


Finally at 11pm the pub shut and we were thrown out, drunken, raucous and reeling, to make an unsteady way to our respective homes and hotel rooms. Helen sneaked in a mysterious quick raid of Budgens before the tube train arrived. But what was in her carrier bag? Will we ever know?

Overall, an excellent day out. ET in real life is a lot like ET online, only faster, and with better table service. And Progress Was Made on a number of topics.

Next stop - Dublin...

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Oh, thank you so much for the photo diary.  The wait's just been painful! ;)  Though I swear all the summing up of the conversations of the day, on this thread and others, is a bit cryptic.  But I guess when you're planning to take over the world, you have to take those types of precautions.  I'm just waiting for ice creams (you say that over there?  in the plural?) to be declared handy explosives decoys and banned where ever ET Meetups are being held.  Thank god it's almost fall...

Oh, and I have to say this, no matter how much it ends up making certain parties blush, but that Migeru, he is a rather attractive fellow, no? :D

Oh, and good job getting Colman in there.  You're his new favorite person in the world, I'm sure...

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Sun Aug 20th, 2006 at 08:30:56 PM EST
Oh-oh, now Misha will be sending his goons after me to eliminate the competition...

Nothing is 'mere'. — Richard P. Feynman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 06:30:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Eliminate the competition? Do be careful, Migeru!  Oh, and if Migeru has a hit out on him, a heads up to afew and Jerome, and maybe Johnny Depp and Mikhail Baryshnikov.  Any one of you might be in danger! ;)

(...I suppose someone should tell my boyfriend, eh?  We might have a witness protection program in our future.)


Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:22:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Helen ordered a glass of your favourite 'stale ale' and I tasted it.  Delicious!!!  Don't remember the name of it though!

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 09:12:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Duchess de Bourgogne (sp?)  It was stale?  

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire
by p------- on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:11:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's its designation, see my beer diary

http://www.eurotrib.com/story/2006/8/8/174720/7830

The first beers were brewed in open baths where wild yeasts would blow in from the fields. this created a vinegar like beer that had to be aged before it could be drunk. Hence beers called "Old", a slightly sharp hoppy beer, and a style no longer brewed in the UK called "Stale" (for those who know it this is the equivalent of a belgian "Lambic").

Actually having tasted it recently it's more of an Old than a stale, but never mind.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:17:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Aha. Lambic, I know...

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire
by p------- on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:23:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
La Gueuse? (Don't look it up in a Fr-Eng dictionary, you'll get the wrong idea...)
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:38:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is that a question?  

So, well, I had to look it up because I have no clue what you're talking about. This is funny:

courir la gueuse:  go looking for a bit of skirt (chase girls)

ET's doing wonders for my language skills...  


Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 01:04:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
La Gueuse is a lambic-type Belgian beer.

But the word means other things, including rascally wench. That's why I told you not to look it up. ;)

(As for courir la g..., the older sense is not as fluffy as a bit of skirt, more, well, rascally wench...)

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 01:08:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, Gueuze...

You know, I've heard of chasing rascally rabbits, but not rascally wenches...

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 01:16:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's true you don't have to chase rascally wenches far. Unlike wascally wabbits.

Yes, it's spelled both ways, -z- and -s-, and you're probably right the -z- is more correct.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 03:25:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've heard gueze pronounced as Hoyt-zuh where the first h is like clearing your throat.

Ah, Cantillon !!! - swoon

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 03:27:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Must be a Flemish word.

This Cantillon?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:24:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, the very same. Very much an acquired taste tho

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:31:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I haven't tried enough Gueuze to acquire it. There are the fruit-flavoured kinds and the sweetened kinds too, that put me off at first tasting.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 05:03:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, as with everything there's good and bad.

Generally I'd recommend Liefman's fruit beers, raspberry or cherry. Go for the ones wrapped in paper that have no label. They are the one's with the full flavour. The labelled small bottles are filtered and a pale reflection of the originals.

Lindemans are okay, but they are noticeably sweeter and less charactered than liefmans. The peach one tastes like perfume, it's beer jim, but not as we know it.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 05:20:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lambic. Mmmmmm (though I've only had it bottled).
Still haven't found any Greene King that is sufficiently aged.
by northsylvania on Tue Aug 22nd, 2006 at 04:46:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
to be honest, I can't imagine draught lambic. It's best when it's 4 or 5 years old and nobody is gonna barrel it for that long. Tho...mmmm what an idea.

It's usually bottled after 2 - 3 and then it's the purhaser's responsibility to age it. Some bars in Belgium have lambics that are 15 - 20 years old I'm told.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Aug 22nd, 2006 at 05:28:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah yes!  It's coming back to me now.  I only had 2 pints in the whole day...not being a huge beer drinker...but I tasted lots of others.  That Rauchtbier was VERY interesting...it would be good with nice bread and cheese...I can still remember the smoky sausagey flavour!

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:08:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bless you, TGB, and I mean that sincerely!  This was almost as good as being there and... and... the shoes!  I'm speechless!  I couldn't be more pleased!!

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Aug 20th, 2006 at 08:37:44 PM EST
Now, honestly, you don't think you'd be just a teensy bit more pleased if Colman had shown up in a pair of those red velvet boots like our tango dancer had on?  :)

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire
by p------- on Sun Aug 20th, 2006 at 08:52:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, okay, yes.  But I'm a pragmatist.

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Aug 20th, 2006 at 08:57:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
btw, I LOVE the hunkered cabal photo -- I'm still laughing.  That more than makes up for the absence of red tango boots.

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Aug 20th, 2006 at 08:58:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Agreed. Metatone looks rather diabolical in that photo.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:29:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Pleased to note that Metatone is rather diabolical. It's part of his subtle charm. The shoes are just a lagniappe.
by northsylvania on Tue Aug 22nd, 2006 at 04:51:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think I'd have run screaming from Wagamamas if he'd turned up in red velvet boots...not to mention the poor innocent Londoners who would have had to run for safety!!...makes me think of the Gaiman/Pratchett book 'Good Omens'...

Scarey stuff...

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde

by Sam on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:00:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
AAaahh - finally!!! Thanks for the photos TBG, almost as good as being there. Glad you all had a great day.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 02:04:30 AM EST
Great pics and great fun, TBG, it looks like a really good day! Nonetheless:

From afar, dear brethren, we note with pain the absence of the Blessed Pancake from your liturgy. The Evisceration and Immersion of the Holy Lemon is in fact a slight (some would say considerable) departure from tradition, essentially based, as I'm sure you know, on the Doctrinal Council of Toulouse (785)'s judgment in favour of the Immoderate Elevation above the Blessed Pancake. Some doctors of the ET Citric Church hold that the Evisceration and Immersion are not incompatible with the Elevation, insofar as the latter precedes the former and the B.P. gets its juice. But wot, no pancakes?

The Concilium Quaternum of Dublin will no doubt be called on to adjudicate.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:15:24 AM EST
Excommunication!

Heresy must be suppressed as soon as it rears its ugly head. What next? Maple syrup?

Lord Commander and Navigator of the Dux, I beseech thee to convene a Compassionate Council of Pilkkunussijat, that we may save the Ancient Traditions of the BP from heathen usurpers.

Where is that Nomad BTW?

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:49:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That was one of the topics I raise.

"Where's Nomad got to?" I said.

"Dunno," said Colman.

"Didn't he go walking?" said metatone.

"In Sweden?" said ThatBritGuy.

"Ah yes," we said in unison, "he went walking in Sweden."

"For six weeks," added Colman.

"With a group of people," added metatone.

I worry that I may have got the names and content wrong in the above, but apart from who said what and what they said about who, it's all, er, oh.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 05:11:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Rather than excommunication, dialogue, my brother...

Nomad is lost in the Swedish forests somewhere. May he soon re-emerge. (But I think he's more a chocolate-pie believer than a true follower of the BP).

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 05:55:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Six weeks in the Swedish Forest?

I hope he remembers to avoid the elks.


Eats cheroots and leaves.

by NeutralObserver on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 10:38:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
alrighty then - ex communication.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 11:26:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
When...is the Dublin meetup? THAT would be fun!!

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:29:41 AM EST
PS: Excellent diary, TBG, thanks!! We are all hoping for updates on the political-economic-environmental discussions...

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:30:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Vaguely next year I believe.

However, the next scheduled meet-up is at the Nottingham beer festival on 21st October featuring Drew, Metatone, Migeru and myself.

Tutored beer tastings will be available. I am, however, most looking forward to Migeru's reaction to real English cider. I doubt he knows what he's let himself in for.

Any more for any more ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:57:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am, however, most looking forward to Migeru's reaction to real English cider. I doubt he knows what he's let himself in for.
You should ask Barbara what "real Asturian cider" is like. We took her to a joint in Madrid which served what must have been a home brew and she swears it was like vinegar to her. The rest of us loved it, of course.

Nothing is 'mere'. — Richard P. Feynman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 06:28:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hmm, well, we'll see won't we ? Personally I don't lke english cider at all, although I 'm fond of perry and have been known to drink crab apple ciders occasiaonlly. They're very entertaining, being bright pink in colour.

ps, me mum reckons it'll be another month before the Bramley cooking apples are ready. But we both agreed that eating E London blackberries wasn't a good idea.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 07:30:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
...and Colman if I can convince him to head over all by his lonesome...

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 08:45:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
and why not your good self ? There's cider or foreign beerif you tink the ale stuff is pooey

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 10:40:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ye olde purse strings...I've an office trip to New York in November which is claiming spare funds...not to mention the lovely concept of Tax Returns in October... BUT! There's always next year...but then again who needs an excuse to taste beers???  Anytime!!

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:03:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We're going to have to make a stop at the Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem pub -- allegedly the oldest in England -- at the foot of Nottingham Castle, as well, Helen, so that I can introduce you to the beer of the God (assuming it's not served at the festival).  Miguel will have a cider buddy, too, since, aside from Newcastle and Bass, Jen isn't wild about English beer.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 09:59:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We're going to have to make a stop at the Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem pub so that I can introduce you to the beer of the God

Hardy and Hansons !!??

You're kidding, right ?

Still, I 'spose it's a tourist tick, best done first thing before it gets busy

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 10:39:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have to get used to H&H, since it apparently runs half the pubs in Notts.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 10:44:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, it's not an awful beer by any stretch. I have friends of otherwise impeccable taste who swear by Kimberley Mild. The bitter's okay, but it's just average is all.

My condemnation is more their poverty of ambition. Real ale is sold as a premium product these days and there are many beers I'd happily pass several pubs to enjoy, but H&H is not one of them. But fret not, nottingham and surrounds is prime drinking country.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 10:52:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But fret not, nottingham and surrounds is prime drinking country.

I've heard that, and that it brings in the student-y riff raff from the surrounding towns and cities on Fridays and Saturdays.  Much drinking and trouble-making, as I understand it, and a little too much tension -- even worse with alcohol involved -- between the natives and the Muslim South Asians.  Being a fairly small guy (ask Miguel) with a large mouth (no need to ask Miguel), I'd rather stay away from that sort of thing.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 11:29:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
it brings in the student-y riff raff from the surrounding towns and cities on Fridays and Saturdays

There is generally an inverse relationship between quality seeking real-ale wise and troublemaking. If you go to pubs that serve excellent real ales, then you'll find yourself surrounded by affable people.

Trouble makers go for lager lager lager lager, they're a different clientele and don't inhabit the same drinking space. You just have to recognise the (easily-read) cultural signposts eg a huge chalkboard advertising Sky Sports = lager bar. Don't go near.

It's probably no different from london. I don't drink in the centre of town on friday nights, but there'd still be a couple of pubs that are okay just outside of the Circle line worth doing even then. And the further out you go, the greater the likelihood.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 11:47:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, yes, my beloved Circle Line.  It made our London journey much easier.

My sense is that you're right about city centers.  The pubs in the Nottingham City Center were clearly playing to the lager-drinking clubgoers.  The ones in the "suburbs" -- English suburbs look more urbanized than many of the downtown areas in the US -- were more to my liking.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:04:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I used to drink snake bites.

In three years of walking home in a rather wobbly and studenty way, I never saw any trouble.

Maybe I was just lucky. (Admittedly, being quite large may have helped on a couple of occasions.)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 01:20:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Snkebites ? Were you a crusty ?? ;-))

No wonder you've given up booze drinking that filth

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 03:30:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've never had a pint of Kimberley mild.  Suppose I'll have to try it.  I tried Olde Trip, which I believe is a bitter but could be wrong, and loved it.  But, so long as the beer is not Abbot Ale or something that tastes like Abbot Ale (I'd drink Coors before that, and I despise Coors), I generally enjoy English beer.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 11:39:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We must have a trip to Cambridge. I'll show you a pint of Abbott that'd maybe change your mind. Far as I'm concerned, if one pub (Free Press) can get it so right then the beer is basically good but the cellarmanship is poor.

I blame the sales pitch which says "deliver Grrene king at lunchtime, ready to serve by dinner". It may be clear but it still won't be fit to drink for days, but time is money and a beer sitting in a cellar not being sold is losing money. That's why it's mostly sold in crap condition.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 11:52:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe.  To me, Abbott Ale seemed to be a mixture of cardboard and maple syrup, but it may have been the result of poor cellarmanship.  I tried Olde Trip, Bombardier, Abbott, Guinness (to get rid of the Abbott taste), and some kind of bitter served at Harry Ramsden's restaurant.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:12:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
hee, rubs hands in glee. Don't worry young man, we'll soon have you on the straight and narrow.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:22:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Uh-oh.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:57:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Perfect for contemplation of George and Tony's crusade.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 03:52:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My father and I had the same thought while in Notts.  The locals, for some reason, didn't seem very amused when we mentioned it.  Quite a few were apparently Blairites.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:26:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Great diary, laddie!

Ah, cows...

The lemon is genius, and the crisp packet even more so.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 05:17:47 AM EST
"I saw a coo -- a bull, begod!"

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes
by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 01:01:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Migeru and rg played Backgammon, and a peculiar paper-based version of Go with an apparently arbitrary board size.
<sigh>Of course it's an arbitrary board size! This calls for a diary, so many misunderstandings as I've seen in everyone's accounts of our Go session cannot go unanswered.

Nothing is 'mere'. — Richard P. Feynman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 06:33:14 AM EST
Great diary, TBG.  Thanks.  It sounds like everything went well, and that everyone had a blast.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 09:52:38 AM EST
And now for a few extra photos...from the other camera...

ThatBritGuy
Metatone
Helen
Colman
Through beer tinted glasses...
Cheers Poemless!
Camera's at dawn...or was that 2pm?
Helen and Northsylvania


We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 05:09:45 PM EST
I like the look of metatone's beer !!!!

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 05:22:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspect the superposition of a bottle of beer for my body is an accurate artistic judgement by that time of the day.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Tue Aug 22nd, 2006 at 02:47:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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