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Friday Photography Blog #8 [UPDATED]

by LEP Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 02:55:51 AM EST

Greetings from Paris. It's Friday, October 19 and time for our weekly Photo Blog. This week, we'll do just a regular photo blog with no particular specialty. I am proposing that today be an informal "black and white" day;  if you have black and white photos please post them. Black and white is something that that interests me greatly, primarily because I can't do them very well. I shoot only in digital; but I'm trying to learn.
But please post your color photos also; don't feel restricted or limited in any way.
Post as many photos as you like; there are many of us here who appreciate them.

You can find the technical details for posting photos in Wednesday Photography Blog No.2

If you post a photo, please think to recommend this diary so that it can stay in a prominent position for a day or two to remind readers to look at our photos

I have rediscovered many photos on my hard drive that I took for several months last year with my Kodak Z650 before I received my Nikon D80 as a gift. So I'll post a few of them today.
I'll start off with a photo of a well known Place in Paris, which is hard to recognize from the photo, because it's usually filled with people. This photo was taken at 9:30 on a Sunday morning last November. afew will recognize it. In the spirit of this blog it mixes a bit of color on a black and white.

Update [2007-10-20 2:27:40 by LEP]: This photo is of the Place du Tertre, near the top of Montmartre. It is always filled with chairs and tables from the restaurants surrounding it and tourists walking around and artists trying to get a commission to draw your profile. To see it like this, in it's lovely self, you have to go very early in the morning. afew and I lived very close to here at earlier stages in our lives. I have posted my original color photo of the Place du Tertre at the end of the comments below.


Display:
that I found on my hard drive. If I'm found dead you know she killed me for posting this. It evidently a shot of her computer screen while she was having a conversation on MSN with a friend.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:05:19 AM EST
Cute! Btw. what kind of flowers to you want us to send to you funeral? :-)
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:16:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Expensive ones!

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:22:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:28:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks Fran. That's perfect; and beautiful too.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:32:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
that's absolutely fabulous, fran, what a colour!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:38:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
jpeu pa lfaire moi jsuis fauchey

<ah, no, don't get mad, estHer! no, I'm too young to... aarrgghh gurgle silence>

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:31:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's fantastic!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:54:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Isn't that the place we for the ET Montemartre stroll?
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:15:49 AM EST
I mean - were we met.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:21:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No, it's not the Place des Abbesses.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:24:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But we went there. It wasn't empty.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:36:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We did go there after meeting in Place des Abbesses. If I give anymore hints I'll be giving the answer.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:42:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Place du Tertre.


Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.
by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 11:13:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:37:05 AM EST
That's one of the big sculptures outside the Quay d'Orsay museum in Paris.

We have met the enemy, and it is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:39:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bingo!

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:40:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I took this candid shot of some friends at Treasure Trove, as we were heading out for Blues Brothers Night.



by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:49:08 AM EST
That is an excellent black and white photo, In Wales.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:51:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's not Tarantino, that's the Blues Brothers!

We have met the enemy, and it is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:55:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But it has a Tarantino look to it!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:55:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No, it has a Blues Brothers look to it. The Reservoir Dogs look doesn't include the hat!

Go rent the DVD!

We have met the enemy, and it is us — Pogo

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:13:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
WARNING. it's contagious.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:49:10 AM EST
So much fun!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:54:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Went to the Minneapolis Auto Show last spring with a friend who was car shopping.  Got there slightly early so had time to walk around downtown.

The building on the left may be Phillip Johnson's best.  Simple shape with MANY corner offices.  The building on the right is a Caesar Pelli--beautiful shape clad with a favorite local stone.  Minneapolis dvelopers have often hired "name" architects.

Minneapolis HAD an extensive light rail system that was deliberately destroyed in the late 1940s.  It's replacement has ONE line.  Rolling stock by Bombardier.  Note building in background.  A favorite among those of us who believe only REAL builders can do curves.

The star of the auto show.  We have REAL winters in Minnesota which make such vehicles impractical.  Maybe two will sell in the state.  It was about 5 months after the R8 made the covers of the USA car magazines.  

A favorite of mine.  This is the Chrysler Turbine 1963.  Body by Ghia. Note the tail lights.  They made the trunk are almost totally inaccessible but DID look like a fighter thrusters.  The turbine used a lot of fuel and produced asphalt melting exhaust temps but otherwise this car actually worked.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysler_Turbine_Car


"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 03:57:49 AM EST
Thanks for posting this. I've never been to Minnesota.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:06:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If you ever get a chance to visit Minnesota, take it. It's a beautiful state. There's a reason why the state's motto is the Star of the North. My favorite time to visit is in September as the leaves are turning.

Some of my favorite places to visit are St. Paul, especially Grand Avenue and Como Park and Historic Ft. Snelling. The lakes in Minnepolis, be sure to ride the Como-Harriet streetcar by Lake Calhoun.

Outside of the Twin Cities there is the St. Croix valley and the Mississippi as it flows to south toward Iowa. The western state has beautiful prairies and fields of corn (maize). Duluth is one of my favorite places, especially Lake Superior. The Depot Museum has a great collection of locomotives. A short drive north is Two Harbors and the ore docks. Even farther north is Ely and the Boundary Waters Canoe Area -- chains of glacial lakes surrounded by pines and aspens.

It's a lovely state -- very much worth visiting and it has quite a bit of a French connection, historically speaking.

by Magnifico on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:26:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We who live here often forget how beautiful it can be.  Thank you for your kind reminder.  The University of Minnesota's landscape arboretum claims this weekend is the peak for fall colors,  It used to be around Octorber 9th.  Blame warm a autumn and changing climate.

As for the French influence--some of us wish there was more of it ;-)

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:24:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've always been indifferent to the IDS building ("the building on the left" as techno put it). The fact that it looks two dimensional from many angles is pretty neat, though.

Gotta throw in the Foshay Tower if we're doing Minneapolis skyscraper architecture.



you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 01:50:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for the addition.  I actually had cropped out Foshay on the picture I posted.

When the IDS building was erected, the Foshay Tower was the tallest building in Minnesota.  Folks would joke that the IDS building was the "box Foshay came in."

Built in the late 1920s, Foshay, and the economic problems it spawned, would become part of this hstory of the Great Depression.  It is a beautiful building with many Art Deco features.  It is in need of serious repair but a new owner promises it will be rebuilt to its original splendor.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:13:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have no idea what architecture critics say about IDS, but I DO know the locals love it.  The main reason is that it accurately reflects the sky.  We live in a VERY active weather zone and the changing sky is an aesthetic highlight around here.  It's central court is still a model of a well-designed public space.  And there are hundreds of offices with spectacular views.  This is the kind of building folks will lie down in front of bulldozers to save.

Tellingly, Pelli designed his building to be just a bit shorter out of respect for Johnson's masterpiece.  In a profession known for its arrogant prima donnas, this was a VERY classy move.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 11:53:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I lived in Minneapolis for 25 years - my anecdotal experience with people's reaction to the building was more neutral, although still positive. I like the Minneapolis skyline as it is now - it is nicely shaped (I am pretty sensitive to shapes and how they are combined in space).

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Oct 22nd, 2007 at 01:42:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The real-world chrysler turbine that I serviced as a kid (I was a passionate hot-rodder, and worked at a dealer station run by Texaco)was "on lease", like all the chrysler turbines" to the police chief of the city of Grandview, Ohio. The actual turbine was tiny, but the largest thing under the hood was a heat exchanger shaped like a beer keg that rotated through the exhaust and induction air, and preheated the combustion air as it came in to improve throttle response and fuel efficiency, as well as cooling the exhaust gasses. It got about 12- 14 miles to the gallon in actual use, put out about 140 horsepower, and was surprisingly peppy for so little listed power in so large a body-chassis (Chrysler 300-series).It had about a one or one and a half-second lag between throttle application and the onset of acceleration- disconcerting at first, but easily adjusted to.
The incredible thing about the car was it's simplicity. It was just a true gutless wonder. The total number of moving parts in the entire engine powerhead was under ten. During the two years we serviced it, we did nothing but change the synthetic oil. Once. Chrysler bragged about the near-miraculous simplicity and ease of maintenance of the car-- and then realized their mistake, and recalled every one, and destroyed them. Sad. What a sucky business model.  

Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.
by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 03:46:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I can assure you that no one in MY town got to drive one of those 50 turbine cars.  In fact, even though I closely followed this story, I never got to see a real Chrysler turbine until last spring.  I also had forgotten that in 1963, 12 mpg was acceptable gas mileage.

What I hadn't forgotten was how pathetic 140 horsepower was in those times.  By the time I got to my hot-rodding days in the late 1960s, you could buy a Chevy Nova with 375 hp.  No tires or brakes or suspensions, mind you, but enough power to rotate the planet ;-)

My guess is that Chrysler bailed on the turbine engine when they actually discovered how expensive it would be to produce.  As my university professor of transportation technology reminded me one day when I was extolling the future of the Wankel engine, "Just remember, the easiest, most reliable machining operation is the production of a round hole.  Piston engines will be with us a long time."  Even now with CNC mills, machining turbine parts is still hideously expensive.

And they would never have fixed the fuel consumption problem.  Even after 45 years of expensive research since 1963, gas turbine engines are only fuel efficient in high-altitude uses where operating rotations are fixed for long periods.

But when I was bouncing along in my dad's Ford station wagon in the early 60s, I would dream of the silkiness of a turbine powered ride.  The technological optimism of those days was utterly intoxicating.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 07:27:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think this translated very well into black and white.



by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:18:26 AM EST
Can you show us the color version also?

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:24:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think this is it.  It just wasn't an especially well composed shot really. There's nothing special about it in colour either!



by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:39:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Which I think benefits from the same treatment as the b&w

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:55:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Looks ok to me:

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:33:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The master's touch. What'd you do?

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:40:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Being brighter does work better actually.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:41:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I didn't just brighten it: I used the levels tool - available in most packages - to stretch the dynamic range of the image so that it had both solid blacks and solid whites in there.

Images that have only mid-shades of grey don't tend to work.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:52:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales. It looks like we need a photoshop course from Colman.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:02:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You can do that when you're shooting: digital cameras all have a levels display that you can turn on to show whether your image covers the full dynamic range or not. Fiddling with controls should let you improve the situation, though not always.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:08:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nah, I think it's TBG you want for that: I'm using the gimp and iPhoto.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:17:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's a more dramatic version, done by taking out a lot of the green and blue before turning the image into b&w, which roughly approximates the effect of using a red filter on the lens, an old trick for improving the contrast of sky and sea.

The jaggies in the sky are because I was working with a jpg and the compression screws up the manipulation possibilities.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:10:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:23:01 AM EST
Very interesting photo.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:27:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is cheating a bit since I only posted it last week in the Fish Called Rhondda diary, but I like it so here it is again.



by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:43:58 AM EST


Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:04:56 AM EST
Looks like something from Niki de Saint Phalle.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:14:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It looks like Dubuffet, actually.

LEP, still having that Paris stroll this morning?

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:26:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bingo! It's in the CDC near Musee d'Orsee.
We'll call you in a few minutes.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:33:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by Magnifico on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:27:55 AM EST
Where is that?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:42:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Could it be Grand Canyon Railroad?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:59:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, ex, apparently. So, at the Mt. Hood RR?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:17:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
An excellent observation DoDo! You really know your engines.

Before this summer, No. 18 was at the Grand Canyon Railway. Last winter, I believe, the locomotive was purchased by Brian Fleming. His group got No. 18 running again and operated the 2-8-0 on the Mount Hood Scenic Railroad out of Mount Hood, Oregon this summer. Due to fuel costs of running steam and a washout on the upper end of the line combined with less than hoped for ridership, the railroad ceased operating steam at the end of August. The engine and a sister engine, No. 20 are up for sale, as is the railroad.

I was fortunate enough to ride the train in early August and take some pictures. I think she is a real beauty and she sounds wonderful going up the grade. I hope she finds a good home.

by Magnifico on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:21:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:28:55 AM EST
Is that Greece?

We have met the enemy, and it is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:26:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You're not having a good time with Egyptian temples today are you ;-)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:33:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:30:45 AM EST
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:13:39 AM EST
Petra?

We have met the enemy, and it is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:27:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Luxor.
by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:28:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I just took a closer look and saw the carvings are Egiptian Hyeroglyphics... D'oh!

We have met the enemy, and it is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:30:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 06:31:26 AM EST
Wow, I like that photo! It looks like out of some history of the 20th century book.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 07:23:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, but, as the neo-libs and -cons will tell us, we are like, so-o-o-o twentieth-century... ;-)
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 08:03:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually when turning it into black and white the filters make it look like there's much more smoke than there actually is.

the original feels quieter, and is closer to the true spirit of the demonstration :


Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 11:49:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 - from almost B&W to colour

jugs-3

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 07:25:47 AM EST
Last winter:

Firewalker:

Heavily processed:

Skull:

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 07:31:08 AM EST
Excellent photos, as usual!  How do you get the vignetting effect on the bottom one? I assume the flowers had the lighting set up to fade out towards the edge?

The glare on the skull shot really adds to it.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 12:03:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
These are awfully nice, TBG.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 01:26:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A classmate working in the studio on Tuesday:

Lonneke

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--

by tzt (tzt) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 10:33:32 AM EST
That's so good!  I really love that.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 11:20:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 12:52:05 PM EST

On Geezer's houseboat earlier today.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 01:14:02 PM EST
Jerome, Linca and Migeru solving Europe's problems over a drink soon to be served.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 03:29:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Risico" is a small commercial freighter, built in the Pays Bas, in Friesland to be specific, in 1924 and called a "Tjalk". She spent 60 years hauling cargo under sail and diesel power in the inland and coastal trade as far as Marseilles to the South and Norway to the North. She was converted to a yacht 16 years ago, and then reconverted to a wheel-chair acessible yacht five years ago by us. Of course, we love her.
A houseboat (in the European context)is a squareish sort of thing with some sort of float under it that adds to the eye-pollution of the world, but that can offer a way to beat the cost of housing for many who need it.
I am grateful to be on a little ship, --that aint square.
"Risico travels an average of over 2000 kilometers each year, and is our last magic carpet, after having had many.
 

Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.
by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 04:09:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for the history, Geezer.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 04:19:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:43:15 PM EST
Must admit, that freaks me out!!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 05:46:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 04:46:19 PM EST
Wow. Lovely. Photoshop element 5?

Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.
by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 04:11:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
it was a while ago...

funny, that's what i called it, 'wow'

i did a series of this girl's pic, but my imagewell uploader to flickr has stopped working and i can't find a way to do it any more, so just have stuff i already put there to choose from.

here's another pic, not photoshopped this time...



'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 04:47:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
At your service, even if always late.


Repairman (Vietnam Silk Factory 2001) A little tint added.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 08:42:12 PM EST
Oh wow. What a great photo!

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 05:25:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you!

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 12:21:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Typical street scene Sanaa, Yemen, cir. 1991. All self respecting men carry the Jambiya, but most don't employ the "quickdraw" stance of the fellow on the right. Maybe he was a little young.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 08:46:47 PM EST

Temple in the Lake. Hanoi, cir. 2001.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 08:49:00 PM EST

Vietnamese Shoe Rack - Rice Field - North of Hanoi cir. 2001.  No offense intended.  This water buffalo was the valuable workmate of the farmer I posted a few weeks ago.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 08:54:31 PM EST

Latin Culture Day, No. Virginia.  Taken with my vintage screw mount Yashica SLR and Vivitar 70-210/f3.5 zoom.


I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 08:58:13 PM EST

Famous colorful church at Cupilco, Tabasco, Mexico (Temple of the Assumption)

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 09:04:36 PM EST

AMP Centrepoint Tower, Sydney


A little closer!

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Oct 19th, 2007 at 09:09:28 PM EST
Wonderful photos. Thanks Gringo.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 02:10:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 12:17:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
These are amazing photos, thanks for posting them. The one of the Vietnamese silk worker is fantastic.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 03:24:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 12:18:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
of the Place du Tertre which is the photo in the introduction to this photo blog.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 02:38:31 AM EST
this was just outside the restaurant where i went to see the blues band thursday night.
whatta combo, good blues and wonderful buildings!



'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 10:58:03 PM EST


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 11:13:53 PM EST
Heh. Another grey. What size is he?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Sun Oct 21st, 2007 at 03:59:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
he's a pureblood camargue, and they are not large, 14 1/2 hands.

too big to be a pony... not full grown yet.

this breed starts off different colours and all turn white over time.

and that pleases me...

they were imported as long ago as the roman empire and known for their hardiness and intelligence.

where is your grey from?

hope you're feeling better.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Oct 21st, 2007 at 07:59:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 11:16:39 PM EST


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Oct 20th, 2007 at 11:17:06 PM EST


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Oct 21st, 2007 at 06:57:59 AM EST


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