Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Happy Open Thread

by Jerome a Paris Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 01:10:04 PM EST


Happy, because when asked whether we should do an early IRM, the doctor told us that it was not needed (there's one scheduled in a month) and that we should get in our heads that pretty soon we won't have any reason to come to the hospital anymore. Such optimistic talk was as unexpected as it is nice to hear!

Display:
Such wonderful wonderful news.  And lovely art.  Happy thread, happy day, happy life.

Karen in Austin

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 01:15:37 PM EST
That's great news, I'm really pleased.  

I love the picture - it's a shame that bird pictures become so standardised when children get older, this version is so much more original.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 01:20:43 PM EST
Congratulations and hugs to the family, Jerome!  It makes my day, too.

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 01:31:04 PM EST
That's just great news, Jérôme! That bluebird's a magician!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 01:38:35 PM EST
Merveilleuse nouvelle. Je suis très heureux pour toi et ta famille.

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 02:07:05 PM EST
Moi aussi.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 03:20:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Moi aussi ...

Pour Mark & Sarah aussi ... (Copains avec bonne nouvelle aussi ...)

Blogging regularly at Get Energy Smart. NOW!!!

by a siegel (siegeadATgmailIGNORETHISdotPLEASEcom) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 10:02:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just to be clear ...

Terrific news Jerome ...

And, it was wonderful to be hearing good news from Mark and then you in such a short time span ...

Blogging regularly at Get Energy Smart. NOW!!!

by a siegel (siegeadATgmailIGNORETHISdotPLEASEcom) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 10:12:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Brilliant news. I a so happy for you and your family

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 02:17:07 PM EST
Excellent news.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 02:21:36 PM EST
Just last night we were wondering how that was going. Congratulations, you must be very relieved.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 02:38:57 PM EST
Wonderful! Congratulations!
by lychee on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 02:39:18 PM EST
Omoyele Sowore

http://globalexchange.org/getInvolved/speakers/134.html

"His activism began in 1989, when he took part in student demonstrations protesting the conditions of an International Monetary Fund (IMF) loan of $120 million to be used for a Nigerian oil pipeline -- the IMF loan conditions were to reduce the number of universities in the country from 28 to just 5.
...
Currently abroad being treated for the effects of torture, Sowore is adamant he'll return to Nigeria. "Change will not come to Nigeria on a platter of gold," he insists. "If you want justice, you have to fight for it."
"

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

by metavision on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 02:46:08 PM EST
Thanks for sharing - this is wonderful news Jérôme!
by Fran on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 02:55:21 PM EST
Excellent news and excellent picture!
Keep smiling!

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 03:00:01 PM EST
Congratulations. :)

You must be so glad it's all over.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 03:14:22 PM EST
Breaking news:

During his entire career as PM, Swedish former PM Göran Persson (1996-2007) was regularly interviewed by the journalist Eric Fichtelius, who has made it all into a 4 hour documentary. Persson is extremely frank as the show was promised to be aired only after his retirement as PM.

The first part of four was aired tonight and I just watched it. The funniest thing from a European presepective is what he says about the day when the EMU treaty was signed.

Everyone was worried as Kohl, Chirac, Blair and Duisenberg where gone. So everyone figured they were up to something. Suddenly, Kohl storms in looking totally crushed and pissed off. He is black around the eyes and sits down with Persson and some more people, starting to moan about being tricked by Chirac and Blair, and that he gave them too much, and that his entire next election is spoilt. His translator sobs while she translates.

Suddenly Kohl orders in a saucer. He takes at least ten of those tiny enclosed butter boxes and empty all of them on the saucer. And then he eats all the butter, extremely fast. And then he orders in another saucer of butter. While he eats it he relaxes and seems to resign himself with his fate.

I am looking forward to the bext episode where they'll cover Perssons visit to North Korea! :D

Other interesting if more domestic things: calls former rightwing PM and current foreign minister "such a fucking idiot" and says that new socialist chairman Mona Sahlin's "greatest strength is not thinking". Also covered how he repeatadly pisses off his minister of social affairs and later EU commisioner, Margot Wallström.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 03:23:38 PM EST
Can be seen online here or (probably) in more agreeable format pretty soon on The Pirate Bay.

The EMU part starts about 47 minutes in. It is mostly Persson telling his version in Swedish so it is an excellent opportunity to practise language skills.

I did not see the whole thing yet, but in addition to what he calls other he also at one time calls himself "so bloody disgusting" and that he needs to loose 15 kilograms, so he is rather frank with the way he sees things.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 03:45:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm watching it again now, and I forgot that when Kohl stormed in he screams (in German I guess): "Here you see the monkey Europe! I don't want to be the monkey of Europe whom everyone laughs at!"

And then he proceeds to eat butter, copious amounts.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:01:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suddenly like Persson alot more :) Good to hear that I am not alone in my views on your "good" foreign minister.
by Trond Ove on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 07:43:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is so funny! I transcribed and translated the EMU, Kohl, butter bit for some friends:
Voice of Göran Person, former Swedish Prime minister:
"It was a great day. It was May the second 1998."
Narrator voiceover:
The german Mark will become the Euro. The leaders of the EU meet for their historical decision about the monetary union. But nothing is done until everything is done!
Göran Person, again:
We gathered, as one always does, before lunch. We were standing around talking, I think we were supposed to start at 1pm, with lunch, but it was getting late for that. It was under the British presidency, Blair was not seen, Kohl was not seen, Chirac and Jospin were not seen, Vim Cook was not seen. So one understood that something was going on, something was happening. Around 2pm, there is some noise, banging with doors, and then Kohl enters the room. And the good Kohl is completely, incredibly, upset. He is torn up. He is gesticulating, and he is black around the eyes. And when he enters the room, he yells: "Here you see the monkey in Europe! I don't want to be the monkey in Europe! The one that everyone laughs at!" It was the crisis around appointing this Duisenberg, as the new president of the Central European Bank, the French were blocking, but the Germans thought it would be worked out. And it was the Germans who would be in trouble if it didn't, because it was the Germans who had an election coming, and this is Kohl's project, it can't fail. So, Kohl is very upset when he enters. He sits down. And then he starts to, like,... eat... butter. And he eats copious quantities of butter. At first one saucer, and I think it was about 10 of those packaged butter pieces, 10g apiece which lie there, consumed quickly. And then he brings in another saucer, and also those are eaten. And then he starts to calm down. And we are still waiting for Blair, Jospin and Chirac, and Vim Cook. And then they too arrive. And some kind of deal has been made, the kind of deal in which Kohl has gone too far. He has agreed to a deal between France and the Netherlands which Germany cannot accept. "What will he think of me now? The man on the street, who trusted me, what will he think, and it's over now, I will never manage, that it should end like this". Kohl is not so dumb, as a political animal, that he didn't get that his election is now blown. And he is sitting and telling us this, and his interpreter, I remember, the woman who was always with him, she was sobbing while translating. And then we moved down for forms sake, sometime in the night, to take this decision, to start the EMU. And everything dissolved into total chaos, and bad a mood, and an enourmous crisis, if anything else is really the begining of the EMU.
by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 05:01:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
put this in a diary, so that more people can see it.

And the Dutch guy's name is Wim Kok.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 05:09:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 08:13:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And some kind of deal has been made, the kind of deal in which Kohl has gone too far. He has agreed to a deal between France and the Netherlands which Germany cannot accept.

Ah, the infamous Duisenberg/Trichet deal.

What, the Germans not only wanted the DM to become the currency of the EU and the Bundesnak to become the ECB, but also a German chairman of the bank?

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 05:24:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Duisenberg was Dutch.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 05:34:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Precisely: a deal between France and the Netherlands that the Germans wouldn't like.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 05:35:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't get you. Duisenberg was Kohl's candidate, he was upset that the French got through with a political deal for Trichet after a half term, where does a German chairman of the bank come into the picture?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 06:05:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Excellent. Soon you'll only need fear the tooth fairy ...
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 03:33:31 PM EST
What are the rates these days? Or is cash for teeth an American thing only?

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 03:39:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't recall, but when we were there earlier in the year the young gentleman in question was looking forward to a bounty when he managed to work the loose tooth - hanging by a thread -  out. Though, frankly, I think he was enjoying grossing the adults out more than any bounty he'd receieve ...
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 03:42:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I loved grossing adults out!  I remember 10p going up to a pound. Although one day when two teeth fell out within an hour of each other I didn't get double the bounty.  Apparently I was 'too old' at 12 to believe in the tooth fairy anymore.  Certainly not!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:39:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The going rate in this part of France is one euro. Left by a mouse, not a fairy.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:03:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A mouse?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:40:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yip. Seems to me it was a mouse when I was a kid, too. I don't remember any fairy. The rate was sixpence (= 2.5p).
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:47:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Rates have been goind down. Used to be 10 francs when I was a kid.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 05:17:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh well, this is, you know, la France d'en bas... ;)
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 01:42:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Good news!

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 03:52:55 PM EST
Okay, in 6 weeks my free laptop and internet access will be summarily removed by my ex-employer. Currently I'm on XP.

Question : I've only ever used microsoft products before but should I switch to Mac or Unix  ? I'm very paranoid about virii, and other nasties burrowing into my hard disk so staying away from microsoft vulnerabilities is tempting, but what am I letting myself in for with the others. I'm an old DOS hand so unix command lines don't intimidate.

Once we decide on OS, what applications do I need ? I only use email and word processing and will probably need accountancy programmes.

Advice from the gurus please ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:10:15 PM EST
I'd say a Mac laptop, no question about it.

And that's coming from a linux fan who happily uses linux on laptops.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:18:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Get the Ubuntu Linux CD image here:

http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/download

(choose 6.10, desktop, x86 and a location near you)

And boot from it, so you can play with it without installing it on your hard drive.

About accounting, I know some companies have their accounting running on Linux so it's doable but I'm not a specialist.

by Laurent GUERBY on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:25:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As a recent switchee from XP to Ubuntu myself, I would have to agree. In many ways it is easier than XP at this point in its development. (Althought there has been a couple of minor issues where I had to go past the GUI. Luckily there are lots of howtos on the net.)
by Trond Ove on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 07:47:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You should go back to this diary.
by balbuz on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 05:03:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Since it sounds like you have good computer skills, you could get a mac laptop and create a small linux partition and set up a dual boot system (pretty easy to do, ubuntu sets it all up for you). If linux isn't for you you can delete the partition and stick strictly with OS X.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 05:25:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'll vote for 'any.'

You can get free no-hassle virus checkers for Windows which sit in the background and chew on anything that tries to attack. As long as you don't use Outlook or Outlook Express as your emailer - because Outlook and its spawn include some phenomenally stupid non-security features - you should have no problems.

The Mac experience is more or less indistinguishable from the Windows experience now, in my experience. The one nice Mac feature missing on Windows is a wrist-flick window switcher built into the OS. Otherwise, you'll probably be running Firefox and possibly Thunderbird, and the experience is the same on either platform.

For accountancy apps - as in 'does accountancy, isn't a spreadsheet' - there's a much wider choice on Windows.

Many ISPs can offer an optional spam and virus catching service, so nasties won't even get downloaded to your machine, whatever it is.

I use Mac OS and WinXP interchangeably now. Aside from some networking issues, most of the time I don't even notice which one I'm using.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 05:34:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If you're buying a laptop there's basically two options, either you're going to buy a WIndows laptop or a Mac laptop. Linux native laptops are rarer than hens teeth. The Mac version of almost identical hardware is going to cost you roughly £200 more than the PC version. The other advantage of buying a windows based PC is if you find you can't do what you want  on Linux, then you have an escape route back to software you are comfortable with.

Paranoia about virus infection is ususally overblown. If you keep your machine patched up to date, and run decent antivirus software you shouldn't have that many problems (that is unless you have a taste for large volumes of porn, strangely it's the people who use excessive ammounts of it, that seem to be at the centre of virus outbreaks)

Installing Linux on a laptop can be a bit of a nightmare, especially if you have a problem with network card drivers. If it works fine Fab, but when it dosent it's a right pain.

If you're moving over to  Linux, then Open office is the toy you want. That will do all of your office tasks, as for Accountancy software, I'm sorry but I think that you'd know more about what you'd be looking for in open source accountancy software than I would.

If you need Linux disks or any more advice, you have my email address.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 05:59:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Installing Linux on a laptop can be a bit of a nightmare, especially if you have a problem with network card drivers. If it works fine Fab, but when it dosent it's a right pain.

It is an unfortunate fact that one still needs to check the Linux Hardware Compatibility HOWTO before buying the newest hardware. For laptops there's the Linux on Laptops page.

Generally, if you don't insist on buying the latest and "greatest" models (which are also grossly overprized) you'll be okay in terms of hardware compatibility.

Some brands are very bad about using proprietary hardware that is not quite standards-compliant. My personal black list includes Sony and Dell.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 06:07:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This can't be emphasized enough. I'll vouch for my thinkpad in terms of ease of linux installation.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 06:18:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I would check sourceforge for accounting (and enterprise) software for SMEs.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 06:15:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm thrilled to hear it, Jerome.  Congrats!

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:48:34 PM EST
Isn't life ...just... beautiful ?
by balbuz on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 04:56:54 PM EST
Ga. Senate Panel OKs Confederate Month
A panel of Georgia lawmakers signed off Thursday on a plan to create a Confederate heritage month, even as legislative leaders reacted coolly to a push to apologize for the state's role in slavery.

Sen. Jeff Mullis' bill would dub April as Confederate History and Heritage Month to honor the memory of the Confederacy and ''all those millions of its citizens of various races and ethnic groups and religions who contributed in sundry and myriad ways to the cause of Southern Independence.''

The unanimous vote by the Senate Rules committee -- which sent the plan on to the full Senate for consideration -- comes days after black lawmakers announced plans to ask the state to officially apologize for its role in slavery and segregation-era laws.

[...]

Cornerstone Speech by CSA Vice President, Alexander Stephens of Georgia, March 1961

This new constitution. or form of government, constitutes the subject to which your attention will be partly invited. In reference to it, I make this first general remark: it amply secures all our ancient rights, franchises, and liberties. All the great principles of Magna Charta are retained in it. No citizen is deprived of life, liberty, or property, but by the judgment of his peers under the laws of the land. The great principle of religious liberty, which was the honor and pride of the old constitution, is still maintained and secured. All the essentials of the old constitution, which have endeared it to the hearts of the American people, have been preserved and perpetuated. Some changes have been made. Some of these I should have preferred not to have seen made; but other important changes do meet my cordial approbation. They form great improvements upon the old constitution. So, taking the whole new constitution, I have no hesitancy in giving it as my judgment that it is decidedly better than the old.

[...]

But not to be tedious in enumerating the numerous changes for the better, allow me to allude to one other --though last, not least. The new constitution has put at rest, forever, all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institution--African slavery as it exists amongst us--the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. This was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution. Jefferson in his forecast, had anticipated this, as the "rock upon which the old Union would split." He was right. What was conjecture with him, is now a realized fact. But whether he fully comprehended the great truth upon which that rock stood and stands, may be doubted. The prevailing ideas entertained by him and most of the leading statesmen at the time of the formation of the old constitution, were that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically. It was an evil they knew not well how to deal with, but the general opinion of the men of that day was that, somehow or other in the order of Providence, the institution would be evanescent and pass away. This idea, though not incorporated in the constitution, was the prevailing idea at that time. The constitution, it is true, secured every essential guarantee to the institution while it should last, and hence no argument can be justly urged against the constitutional guarantees thus secured, because of the common sentiment of the day. Those ideas, however, were fundamentally wrong. They rested upon the assumption of the equality of races. This was an error. It was a sandy foundation, and the government built upon it fell when the "storm came and the wind blew."

Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner- stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery--subordination to the superior race--is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.

[...]

It is the first government ever instituted upon the principles in strict conformity to nature, and the ordination of Providence, in furnishing the materials of human society. Many governments have been founded upon the principle of the subordination and serfdom of certain classes of the same race; such were and are in violation of the laws of nature. Our system commits no such violation of nature's laws. With us, all of the white race, however high or low, rich or poor, are equal in the eye of the law. Not so with the negro. Subordination is his place. He, by nature, or by the curse against Canaan, is fitted for that condition which he occupies in our system. The architect, in the construction of buildings, lays the foundation with the proper material-the granite; then comes the brick or the marble. The substratum of our society is made of the material fitted by nature for it, and by experience we know that it is best, not only for the superior, but for the inferior race, that it should be so. It is, indeed, in conformity with the ordinance of the Creator. It is not for us to inquire into the wisdom of His ordinances, or to question them. For His own purposes, He has made one race to differ from another, as He has made "one star to differ from another star in glory." The great objects of humanity are best attained when there is conformity to His laws and decrees, in the formation of governments as well as in all things else. Our confederacy is founded upon principles in strict conformity with these laws. This stone which was rejected by the first builders "is become the chief of the corner"--the real "corner-stone"--in our new edifice. I have been asked, what of the future? It has been apprehended by some that we would have arrayed against us the civilized world. I care not who or how many they may be against us, when we stand upon the eternal principles of truth, if we are true to ourselves and the principles for which we contend, we are obliged to, and must triumph.

[...]

by MarekNYC on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 06:44:54 PM EST
I think we should institute a "Re-enactment of Sherman's March" month in order to celebrate our (mine, at least) glorious heritage of shooting those racist [adjectives and nouns deleted to protect the children] slaveholding [adjectives and nouns deleted to protect the children] scumbags who can all go [[verbs and adverbs deleted to protect the children] themselves.

The only good things to come from the Confederacy were invented by Africans.  


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 08:15:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That speech by Stephens is 1861, not 1961.

After seeing the date, I nearly had a heart attack reading what he was saying.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 02:01:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Congratulations!

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 06:49:57 PM EST
who says christmas comes only once a year?

breathe easier, jerome...

felicitations!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 07:38:33 PM EST
Congratulations on the good news, Jerome!

While we are into the graphical creations of the smaller, less cynical members of our species, here is a link to drawings by russian school children of president Putin:

http://community.livejournal.com/ru_marazm/609062.html?page=1

My favourite is the last picture, althought it is probably drawn by someone older than the others. Does anyone know what the text says in it?

by Trond Ove on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 07:56:13 PM EST
Not sure cause my Russian never was great (as well as English, ha-ha) but I think the title is
"Battlefield-Russia". I can't read other words there...


Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 10:48:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
my Russian never was great

And I thought Serbian and Russian were very close ? To the point that a Russian could read Serb quite easily ?

by balbuz on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 04:23:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No. Not at all. I can better understand Czechoslovakian or Polish, not to mention Bulgarian, then Russian.
Russian and Serbian have similar (but not same) alphabet (Cyrillic) but Serbs use Latin equally if not more. Only lately with national awareness Serbs started to use "Cyrillic" a lot.
I've learned Russian at school.


Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 10:08:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting that you say "Czechoslovakian" but not "Serbocroatian".

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 10:13:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I did not do it on purpose. I used to call it Serbo-Croatian and I still think its one language with different dialects.
I have no idea if there is any difference between Czech and Slovakian. Probably there is...


Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Wed Mar 21st, 2007 at 06:29:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What's with the dog theme?

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 05:07:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
apparently, he's got a labrador called Koni, who's recently scared that Deutch Angel(-a) Merkel when all three of them met

or you may  want to start a diary called "Is a Russian leader into zoophilia as well?" After all, everybody in the EU  gotta remember that Mr Pu is a devoted paedopile - recall how he kissed a little boy's tummy?

The pictures are just as bad as Mr Jerry's kid's one. Glad that Mr Jerry Jr gets over his illness. No hope for those  fucked in head parents who encourage their children to draw polititians though

by lana on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 10:29:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It reminded me alot of childrens pictures I have seen of the US president, and I guess, of the norwegian king. Which I guess is why I found it fascinating (as well as scary.) As well as how stereotypical many of the drawings were. Hierarchy is universal I guess...
by Trond Ove on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 12:46:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Happy news indeed!
by das monde on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 09:20:31 PM EST
I am overjoyed at your news Jerome!  Finally, something to cheer about.  

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 09:29:13 PM EST
This is joke:

There was a survey around the world with one question:
What is your opinion about food shortages in rest of the world?

Survey ended catastrophically.

-In Africa they didn't know what the word FOOD means.

-In Western Europe they didn't know what word SHORTAGE means.

-In Eastern Europe they didn't know what a word (own) OPINON means.

-In USA they didn't know what word REST OF THE WORLD means.

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein

by vbo on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 10:31:25 PM EST
Oh I just now actually had time to read your post Jerome. That is fantastic news! I hope you and your family will find peace in your souls and minds again...
I hope we all will find it with in our lives too. God bless!


Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Mon Mar 19th, 2007 at 10:40:22 PM EST
Was actually wondering last week how things were.

Fantastic news, for your son, for you and for your whole family. Happy, indeed.

by Nomad on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 12:31:16 AM EST
Congratulations and continued best wishes to you and your family, Jerome!!

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Tue Mar 20th, 2007 at 03:00:08 AM EST
Oh my God! What happened to "HAPPY open Thread"???
I can relate with Lana! I am not that much different in expressing my feelings toward world of today, ha-ha...I am angry about everything, past and future (if we have it as a kind)...I am furious cause people can easily "see grain in other people's eye and can't see a log in their eye"...I am sick when I see what shit they are feeding people through even not very skillfully wrapped propaganda in western world. I am totally confused about what is happening in "ex-Eastern world" at the moment and I tend to call it total chaos. ME is pure hell no matter how they wrap it. I am not going to even mention rest of the world...
All though we should be able to talk about it in civilized manner it's not surprise if sometimes we can't and we just lose it.
There is a lot of animosity out there because of the past and past is a huge baggage to care to the future...We can't just left it by the road. I wish we could...


Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Wed Mar 21st, 2007 at 08:57:19 AM EST
Oh my God! What happened to "HAPPY open Thread"???

Lana showed up.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 22nd, 2007 at 04:42:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
vbo:
There is a lot of animosity out there because of the past and past is a huge baggage to care to the future...

You should come to South Africa. The amount of forgiving the past is beyond any words of description. Every nation can learn from what is happening now, today, in South Africa.

Really, I'm getting more and more impressed with what I've seen in this country per day.

by Nomad on Thu Mar 22nd, 2007 at 07:16:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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