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Successful US diplomacy

by Jerome a Paris Wed May 16th, 2007 at 08:46:06 AM EST

One president of a UNSC veto-wielding country:

"Our relations is cool, if not to say cold. I'm the first to say to recognize that the Americans are partly responsible for this. They tend to think they are on the side of good and thus that everyone else is on the side of evil. They lack curiosity about and appetite for a world that, for many of them, stops at their own borders. They are certain that they are always the best. All this can certainly be irritating."

Another president of a UNSC veto-wielding country:

"Moreover, in our time, these threats [to peace] are not diminishing," he said. "They are only transforming, changing their appearance. In these new threats, as during the time of the Third Reich, are the same contempt for human life and the same claims of exceptionality and diktat in the world."


1) Nicolas Sarkozy

2) Vladimir Putin

And let's not forget their treasonous friends the Germans:

The spectacle of Germany taking the side of Russia against one of the new EU entrants – which Berlin had pledged to treat “equally” with other EU members – raised eyebrows across the room.

The spat not only exposed a widening rift in the EU over how to handle an increasingly authoritarian Russia. It also called into question the ability of Germany, current holder of the EU presidency, to remain neutral in a whole range of disputes between Russia and its former Soviet-era satellites in eastern Europe. Nor was this the first time that Germany had upset the European status quo in favour of its relationship with Moscow.

(...)the latest crisis shines an awkward light on the extent of Germany’s dependence on Russia and how it is affecting its foreign policy.

Translation note: "European status quo" = Europeans standing unquestioningly on the US line

Look for signs of disobedience and disagreement and you'll find them. Take these as personal offenses and relationships will quickly deteriorate. Require absolute obedience even from your friends and they'll eventually drift away or snap.

Paranoid control freaks do not make good diplomats. Journalists toeing their line unquestioningly do not make good journalists.

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The spat not only exposed a widening rift in the EU over how to handle an increasingly authoritarian Russia.
This is the way 'they' like to put it, huh. I'd've though the 'issues' with Russia were primarily on energy/economy (give exploitation rights to our companies, they need profits!) or 'security' (hey, you wouldn't mind if we put some missiles right on your border, would you.) I don't see how Russia being 'authoritarian' has anything to do with this. And God help us if they think about this in terms of how to 'handle' Russia! I doubt Russia would be very interested in being 'handled' and would think they are large enough to very much resist it. But sure, why not try some more 'diplomacy' using the wonderful tactics of condescending and patronising rhetoric against a country that no doubt is moving into a more and more prominent position in the world hierarchy. Yeah, that sounds like a really great idea.
by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 09:28:55 AM EST
Meanwhile, China, whose low-cost production facilities  our capitalists fall over each other to use, is not "authoritarian".
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 11:42:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Worst-(US) President-ever!!

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 09:39:04 AM EST
"Worst US President ever" is a bit restrictive.
"Worst President ever" is just fine.
by balbuz on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 12:27:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, in the requisite CBG voice you should probably specify that it's somewhere on earth ...


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri May 18th, 2007 at 05:34:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You can go the Carlsberg way and say "probably".

Bush is a symptom, not the disease.
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri May 18th, 2007 at 05:44:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm afraid you've lost me now. Could I have the CliffNotes for this one?

(With no TV and no newspapers I'm really behind on popular culture that doesn't come in Bittorrent/emule/DC++ form ...)


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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri May 18th, 2007 at 06:39:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Carlsberg: probably the best beer in the world.

You must have spent a long time without TV or newspapers to miss that one.

Bush is a symptom, not the disease.

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri May 18th, 2007 at 12:56:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks! (Not as long as I'd like ...)

I had of course heard that one. Just being slow.


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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri Jun 1st, 2007 at 07:03:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The spectacle of Germany taking the side of Russia against one of the new EU entrants - which Berlin had pledged to treat "equally" with other EU members - raised eyebrows across the room.

And we're not even talking about Poland, we're talking about Lithuania.

What political advantage, Mr Schönefelder snapped, was Vilnius expecting to obtain by threatening to block this week's negotiations on a new partnership agreement between the EU and Russia?


Bush is a symptom, not the disease.
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 10:02:32 AM EST
the leaders of the eastern european countries looking to spite russia are very short-sighted.  if they had used their knowledge of russians and the russian language to help russia integrate into europe, they would have had their oil, their pipeline, and great friends on both sides.

instead, they want short-term gratification of being vengeful and spiteful

by zoe on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 10:52:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hungary's left wing government is a good example of what can be done with a little cooperation:  the Russians have decided that this is a good place through which to deliver their gas to Europe.  

The Hungarians have as much reason as anyone to hate the Russians.  

by zoe on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 02:03:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
On the subject, more, and a related development.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri May 18th, 2007 at 04:36:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What is Hu Jintao saying?

Bush is a symptom, not the disease.
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 10:03:31 AM EST
He or better his aides are still monitoring situation.

It can be foreseen that Russia's cooperation with Central Asia nations in the energy sphere would not be a plain-sailing in the years ahead nevertheless. Russia and the Western world will be at loggerheads, looked in both open and hidden strifes, as the latter controls the development right of most oilfields in the Caspian Sea area with much more capital for development.

by FarEasterner on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 10:57:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Somewhat related, William Drozniak has a partly self-serving and historically inaccurate, partly insightful op-ed about anti-Americanism in the WaPo (via the Atlantic Review)
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 10:46:55 AM EST
Despite flood of reports that Russia and US agreed to tone down rhetoric it seems unlikely.
Pavel Feldenhauer from Jamestown Foundation speculates about possible new Yalta agreement between West and East and soundly concludes that Rice visit produced only one result: Mr Ivanov is destined to be Putin's sucessor. As he was not known for soft approach towards Russia's immediate Western neighbours even appealing to boycott Estonian goods the East -est relations are set to deteriorate.
Interestingly Russia still hopes to divide EU and US. Probably this will be discussed in Samara - Germans will be asked what they are ready to do to stall American plans in Europe and Russia would say what she can do to improve relations with Eastern Europe.
by FarEasterner on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 10:51:38 AM EST
Dammit, Jerome, Sarko keeps saying intelligent things.

That is classy what he is doing with Moquet's letter, too.

The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet. Winston Churchill

by r------ on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 12:07:11 PM EST
It was so unexpected to see Sarko being actually moved almost to tears - really - by the Guy Moquet letter. Maybe, just maybe, he has a heart ?
by balbuz on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 04:56:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was, too.

The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet. Winston Churchill
by r------ on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 08:43:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Russian media quoted a Kyrgyz secret-service agent as saying that the US has been quietly stockpiling low-grade uranium-tipped weapons at its airbase in Manas for use in any military operation against Iran.

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Central_Asia/IE17Ag01.html

by zoe on Wed May 16th, 2007 at 12:13:47 PM EST


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