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Lupin's post-mortem on the elections

by Lupin Mon May 7th, 2007 at 05:10:19 AM EST

Disclaimer: we (her indoors and I) both voted Sego.

As much as we though the earlier TV debate was mostly a wasted opportunity, we thought the post-election TV coverage (channel 2) was very good.

What a relief to NOT see the plethora of gasbag pundits, phony journalists and the likes clutter the screen as is the case on American TV. Instead we had politicians -- from all spectrum (another different with America) speak from the horse's mouths, as it were. And far more candidly (or so it felt to us) than the US pols.

That was much better than what we were used to in the US. How low have our MSM sunk....

A stunning sight for us: Sarko riding his limo, windows rolled down, with a beehive of motorcycle journalists swarming around his car.

Such a sight would be inconceivable in the US. The nazi-like security bubble that surrounds our politicos is terrifying. Then, again, they have reasons to fear. But still, enormously refreshing. Bravo, France.

Sego's speech: better than the one she delivered after Round 1, I thought. Confident. Good oppositon leader, if she's allowed to be.

Sarko's speech: we were very impressed, both in form (delivery etc) and contents.

I'm afraid unlike most here, we're fairly pro-anglo-saxon model in a number of areas: taxes, social protection, crime, etc. (Sorry if it disappoints some.) We are however in favor of the State's intervention/regulation/control in health, energy, ecology, public services, etc.

(We used to have excellent State services in the US in the 1970s, but that's another story.)

So the Sarkozy agenda scares us less than some here. Our major areas of concern (which is why we did not vote for him) remain: rapprochement with Bush, privatization of State services/transfer of wealth to elites.

On the other hand, a number of other things he said or might implement or try to implement in other areas (crime, social issues, labor issues) elicit something between a "yes" and a "why not?" from us.

His apparent stands on ecology/global warming and Europe seemed very positive, to us.

All in all, it was a refreshing and welcome change from US campaigns driven by loathsome political ads, out of control corruption, meretricious lies and attacks, fascist chicanery at the polls.  And the participation rate was mind-blowing.

Bravo, France!

Update: More commentary on Mrs Lupin's blog at Possumworld.


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from another 'merican. The ball is in Sarko's camp now. Let's how they play it.

If indeed they make a true effort at rapprochement, and do things transparently, it could work out for them.

Otherwise there will be strong opposition.

by Monsieur le Prof (top notch records [all one word] at gmail dot com) on Mon May 7th, 2007 at 06:29:24 AM EST
If indeed they make a true effort at rapprochement, and do things transparently, it could work out for them.

Will be very interesting to watch.

Financial Times: Sarkozy sweeps to power in France

Describing himself as a sincere European, Mr Sarkozy said he would immediately start working for a more integrated European Union but warned that the 27-member organisation had to do more to protect its people from the ravages of globalisation.

"I beseech our European partners to hear the voices of those who want to be protected,"he said.

Huh?

His apparent stands on ecology/global warming and Europe seemed very positive, to us.

Seems confirmed by next paragraph:

Mr Sarkozy also promised closer relations with the US but told Washington that it had a duty not to obstruct the fight against global warming. "France will make this struggle its first struggle," he said.

Why the shiny rhetoric (if that's all that it is)?

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.

by marco on Mon May 7th, 2007 at 06:51:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe he's just confused.

Don't forget Bush said he was planning to be a uniter not a divider. And we know how that that worked out.

Action, not rhetoric.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue May 8th, 2007 at 05:01:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Time will tell indeed.

I'm not knowledgeable enough about France to make predictions.

My "report" above mostly commented (positively) on the differences I perceived with US campaigns.

by Lupin on Mon May 7th, 2007 at 06:40:04 AM EST
Sarko's speech: we were very impressed, both in form (delivery etc) and contents.

Here is a transcript of Sarkozy's speech in English (and in French).

Some interesting lines:


  • Those that feel like no matter what they do, they cannot get out should know that they will not be left aside and that they will have the same opportunities as others.

  • And I beseech, I beseech our European partners to listen to the voice of those peoples who want to be protected, I beseech our European partners, do not be deaf to the anger of those people who see the European Union not as protection but as a Trojan horse carrying inside all the changing world.

  • I also want to see that friendship is accepting that friends can think differently and that a grand nation like the United States has the obligation not to stand in the way of the fight against global warming, but rather to take the lead, because what is unfolding now is the problem of all of humanity. France will make this fight a top priority.

  • France will not abandon women who are condemned to the Burqa, France will not abandon women who are not free. France will be on the side of the oppressed of the world, that is France's message, that is France's identity, that is the history of France.


Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.
by marco on Mon May 7th, 2007 at 07:57:04 AM EST
I was very disheartened to hear how 'closely' Sarko would work with the US, until I heard the exact context. I must admit, this bullet is a piece of good news, to my ears anyhow:

I also want to see that friendship is accepting that friends can think differently and that a grand nation like the United States has the obligation not to stand in the way of the fight against global warming, but rather to take the lead, because what is unfolding now is the problem of all of humanity. France will make this fight a top priority.

If this is true and Sarko plans on implementing policies or lobbying the US to implement sustainable / renewable energy policies, etc., it's some good news on a generally sour day.
by delicatemonster (delicatemons@delicatemonster.com) on Mon May 7th, 2007 at 01:31:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Those interesting lines are pure bullshit! Full stop! American vassals that's what they will be! Freedom is cheapest word today in English language. Poor Americans are far from freedom nowadays and when freedom is delivered/ FORCED through bombs  who would want it! People of Iraq are dieing and crying : " Coalition of the Billing please take your "freedom" and just go away!".
Sarkozy has much more interesting ideas about economy, some of them do not look bad, to be honest, but only if you put aside question: where he plan to collect taxes to feel budget and is he going to meet social obligation of previous governments or he is planning to "leave French working people on their own" like his American friends and strip them of their rights already achieved through hundred of years of battle, like his Australian conservative friends (Howard and his band)? I think it's too late for him to really make long lasting carrier like Howard here cause prosperity times are looking more like sunset now...on their way out...
It's going to be interesting to follow next election in Australia and (in a way) USA. Looks like people are lining more on left now feeling the end of prosperous times...

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Tue May 8th, 2007 at 02:03:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was trying to find a nice way to characterize those "eloquent, interesting" lines but I guess I'll have to go with what you said. Pure bullshit!
by Euroliberal on Tue May 8th, 2007 at 05:32:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sounds like the only socialist to have any success as of late would be my senator Bernie Sanders. Maybe he should write a book.
by TKinVermont on Mon May 7th, 2007 at 11:21:52 AM EST
A week or so ago, when Jerome took Barack Obama to task (not without reason) for a variety of alleged neocon-styled remarks delivered in speeches, I seem to recall that I was one of the few that pointed out that one should not put too much credence in a politician's speech, while the rest of you agreed to soundly condemn Obama for what he said.

Now, on the contrary, Sarkozy's remarks are blithely dismissed as "bullshit" instead of being taken at face value.

I have to say, this smacks of hypocrisy.

by Lupin on Tue May 8th, 2007 at 11:37:00 AM EST
Assessing the speaker and deciding whether you believe they mean what they are saying is hypocritical?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue May 8th, 2007 at 11:44:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Are your purposefully dense?

Reread what I wrote.

by Lupin on Wed May 9th, 2007 at 01:56:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Obama doesn't have a long record of dumping on ethnic minorities, let alone inciting riots. That speech sounded neo-liberal, which should of course be condemned, but it convinced no one that he would ever go to the cruel and inhuman extremes that Bush or Blair has.
by Matt in NYC on Tue May 8th, 2007 at 02:11:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And that has NOTHING WHATSOEVER to do with my point.
by Lupin on Wed May 9th, 2007 at 01:57:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Let me add if I diudn't make it clear above that I wasn't particularly convinced by EITHER speech (Obama's or Sarkozy's) but at least I don't use a double-standard.
by Lupin on Wed May 9th, 2007 at 02:00:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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