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Local Rail Extras I

by DoDo Thu Jul 19th, 2007 at 07:25:26 AM EST

My Local Rail diary turned into a five-part mini-series on dKos. While I added/edited some text, too, I added much more pictures. Now I present the extra images for ET in two diaries.

Sydney CityRail's bi-level M-set ("Millennium Train") M33 at Hurlstone Park, July 31, 2006. Photo by Stuart Jackson from Perthtrains

promted by whataboutbob


Links to the dKos diaries:

  • Part 1 on 'normal' stopping trains (guest-posted by Jerome a Paris),
  • Part 2 on commuter rapid transit (posted by Daneel=DoDo),
  • Part 3 on subways, metros and RER (posted by Daneel=DoDo),
  • Part 4 on light rail and tram-bus (posted by Daneel=DoDo),
  • Part 5 on light metros, tram-trains and conclusion (posted by Jerome a Paris).

Spin-offs:

Many thanks to those who helped in editing/posting/commenting/recommending, especially Jérôme and Bruce.


Network maps

The original diary only showed Metro Madrid's network map (with Cercanías = suburban rapid transit too), now I picked a map for each type of local rail. For stopping trains, just a small one in the illustration for 'winged trains':

Above: the Bayerische Oberlandbahn serves the lines from Munich into the mountains to the south with trains branching into wings twice. On the left, the already joined VT 101 (from Tegernsee) and VT 111 (from Lenggries) roll up with coupler doors opened to VT 110 (from Bayrischzell) to continue to Munich as trio, August 2, 2003. All three are diesel multiple units themselves (type Integral). Photo by Günther Glauz from Bahnbilder.de

Below: the fast coupling of two of the famous Danish "rubber-noses". After coupling, the front with the driver's desks are folded up, to open up a comfortable gangway

For suburban rapid transit, I again picked a city with subway too:

Schematic map of Munich's S-Bahn (rapid transit) network, with U-Bahn (subway) also shown in light grey. Almost all lines pass through an east–west central artery. The inner white zone (which is magnified) is the city proper. Original map as pdf

For trams, to demonstrate the idea of orbital lines superposed on radial heavy rail rapid transit, I chose my hometown (well, now only office-town):

Map of the current tram network of Budapest (yellow/red), with subway (dark grey, dashed: in construction) and local and commuter rail (thick resp. thin light grey) also drawn in. Note the five concentric partial orbital lines on the east bank of the Danube. Based on map on Villamosok.Hu

For an illustration of 'mode-mixing' light metros, I picked a former hometown:

Frankfurt's U-Bahn, a light metro system (apart from the purple line); with the core of the superposed S-Bahn system (thick yellowish-brown) and normal light rail (dashed grey) also drawn in, as are other railways (thin brown) and highways (grey). The metropolitan area is right of center, where stations are frequent: note how three metro lines go way out from the city. Original full-size map at JohoMaps


Stopping trains

There were a couple of bike friends both on dKos and The Oil Drum, this was for them:

Roll-on transport: bikes in and outside the lower floor of the driving trailer of a German Railways bi-level push-pull train, at the door the foot of a man in wheelchair; May 4, 2006. Photo by Michael Katai from RailFanEurope.net

As example for a modern railbus (actually not the most modern – only from the nineties), and further illustration for that line re-opening success I presented:

One of the Schönbuchbahn's railbuses (ADtranz (now Bombardier) type RegioShuttle) arrives in Böblingen-Zimmerschlag – with freight car attached, July 12, 2006. Photo by Uwe Schnell


Rapid Transit

I smuggled this one into the stopping train diary:

Another modern EMU: A wide-gauge, wide-body series 3400 (Siemens-Bombardier type Viriatus) of Portuguese state railway CP approaches Campanhã on the outskirts of Porto, February 26, 2004. Photo by Roberto V. Sousa from RailFanEurope.net

Two Scandinavian wide-bodies:

Need for space: the eight-car SA sets (an Alstom-Siemens co-production) on Copenhagen's rapid transit (S-tog) are wider where they can be, above platforms. Here two of them stop at Valby on line B+, October 4, 2003. Photo by Heinz Steiner from RailFanEurope.net

Another high-capacity Scandinavian: Two of Stockholm rapid transit's (pendeltåg) six-car EMUS of the new X-60 series (Alstom type Coradia Lirex) at Karlberg, March 21, 2006. Photo by Günther Glauz from Bahnbilder.de

Finally, an Aussie diesel multiple unit:

A CityRail DMU of type Endeavour en route to Newcastle overtakes a Pacific National freight train at Maitland NSW, Australia, July 24, 2006. Photo by Stuart Jackson from Perthtrains

:: :: :: :: ::

Check the Train Blogging index page for a (hopefully) complete list of ET diaries and stories related to railways and trains.

Display:
The last dKos diary will be up probably today.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 05:50:23 AM EST
It is now up, posted by Jérôme.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 08:54:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It seems I got Jerome a Paris his fastest dropping diary... must be the length.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 09:43:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It can't get Democrats elected and it doesn't tell people how America knows best or how they can keep driving.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 09:49:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The first episode got over 300 comments and was in the reclist. The second, posted by me, got more recommends and comments in the same time as this one. Both were shorter than this one.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 10:54:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The first even got 420 comments, though it's fair to note that maybe a third of that was generated by an aggressive bus-advocating troll. And I got much more recs for the third than the second.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 10:57:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It might get them elected if they would try it.  Still plenty of room for driving.  Just not for city commutes.

Great series.

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson

by NearlyNormal on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 02:06:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
More of what else was going on ... hard to get on a rec'd list when a filibuster is in play, etc ...

It got reasonable, respectable play.

Blogging regularly at Get Energy Smart. NOW!!!

by a siegel (siegeadATgmailIGNORETHISdotPLEASEcom) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 09:50:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm too busy working to pay old student loans to keep up with all of this. Its either the Tour or politics, and so politics has taken a back seat.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Thu Jul 19th, 2007 at 07:08:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the busy day with the Iraq vote/filibuster had something to do with it too...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 06:28:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I forgot to comment, that in the immediate pre-WWII era Los angleles was said to have had the best integrated public transport system in the world.

But the price for subsidizing the building of the extensive road network as LA expanded during the 50s was that the transport network had to be scrapped.

You can still see some of the old rails at intersections where they just tarmaced over the tracks.

and I loved that the new local rail they're building won't go to LAX....for security reasons. Yea Right.

Idiots.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 08:50:01 AM EST
What I heard was even worse: automobile maker companies owned bus companies bought up streetcar lines only to close them.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 08:57:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
that's about the size of it. yup.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 09:10:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Mind you, railway companies used to buy up canal companies and run/shut THEM down...

Something about Companies, maybe?

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 10:09:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's the Irresistible Logic of the Market™, and the fact that corporations are psychopathic.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 10:13:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
... must apply to a specific proposed system ... and that would likely be intended as a cost-cutting project, since the FAA does not fund through rail projects to airports in its public transport access funding.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Thu Jul 19th, 2007 at 07:06:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
  1. Estate agents expect a further steady rise of house prices (by about 5%/year) along the currently in-construction fourth subway line in Budapest, and similar development as the one along the last-built section of line 3.

  2. Use of oil money for permanent infrastructure: Lybian capital Tripoli wants to finally build a 100-km subway network, re-activating a design contract from 1983(!) with a Hungarian design bureau. (The design was finished back then, but not paid in full, now they will also have to update it). But Lybia also wants to construct 500,000 homes -- and 1,200 km of highways...


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 09:21:52 AM EST
I was in Tripoli earlier this year looking at the development opportunities.

Absolutely amazing, but you have never come across such a minefield in terms of getting things done....

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 10:14:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
High risk, high reward. What's not to love?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 10:16:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Damn it I'm foaming at the mouth to ride all these trains.

Oddly enough Munchen's u-bahn was the first subway I ever rode - at that point in my life (16 years old) I hadn't been in a city in the US with rail transit with the exception of Chicago where we drove. I still remember the stop for our hotel - Sendlinger Tor. Or maybe that was the movie theater. hmm. Time to start relearning the Deutsch I think.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Wed Jul 18th, 2007 at 06:28:22 PM EST
... the M-set (DD electric) and the Endeavour (SD diesel) in New South Wales, as well as the older K-set

and the Intercity V-set:

... and the predecessor to the Millenium Bug, the Tangara (normally marshalled in sets of eight carriages):

While the M-set looks nicer from the outside, the V-set is the best to ride in for longer distances, because of the older fashioned seats that are 2+2 across rather than 2+3 across. As an Intercity, it also has a top speed of 130kph (though AFAIR there is a speed limit on the system of 115 kph).

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Sat Jul 21st, 2007 at 03:04:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do they manage summer heat well? Wanted to ask about the giant window Tangaras long ago.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jul 22nd, 2007 at 04:10:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The older K-sets get hot ... their air conditioning doesn't really have the oomph to cope.

Perhaps because of their narrow doors, with a second door into the vestibule, the V-sets cope with the heat well, unless the air conditioning goes out in a carriage, in which case it tends to empty out as soon as there is space in the other carriages.

The Tangara windows are tinted, so they don't let in much heat, and they have stronger air conditioning. It gets hotter in the platform level sections, which have metro type seating and standing room, but is OK in the seated upper and lower decks.

The M-bugs have even stronger air conditioning, and AFAIR, there are two independent air conditioners in each carriage, so their air conditioning cannot fail all at once.

None of them are kept as cold as the trains I remember in Singapore, but that is probably driven largely by choice of thermostat setting.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Sun Jul 22nd, 2007 at 10:01:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One good news in the middle of a long series of bad news for my railway!

Budapest has two railway bridges over the Danube, both of them originally meant as temporary post-war structures, but not replaced properly to this day. One of them carries a busy with commuters but badly built out railway (single-track non-electrified, often three two-car DMUs for a train), of which it is the worst spot: speed reduction to 20 km/h. And for a decade, it was threatened, with demands that its pillars should be re-used in a bridge of a to-be-constructed fourth ring road.

Now it was at last announced that the replacement of the bridge is planned for 2008. It is 674.4 m long, budget is €68.4 million.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Jul 19th, 2007 at 08:41:28 AM EST
Maybe someone should do a "highway" blog to show some of the monstrous and expensive examples of such wasteful ventures.  The 10 years in the making Springfield interchange on Interstate 95, near Wash DC and the new Woodrow Wilson Bridge over the Potomac River, also near Wash DC, come to mind.

On the plus side (if it ever gets built) the Wash metro area is extending light rail to Dulles Intl Airport.  That will take years to build.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Thu Jul 19th, 2007 at 07:43:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
PS:  Springfield Interchange and Wilson Bridge web sites.   Sorry to muck up your diary with ugliness, but there is a point.

http://www.springfieldinterchange.com/

http://www.wilsonbridge.com/

and finally Dulles Corridor Metro Project

http://www.dullesmetro.com/

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Thu Jul 19th, 2007 at 07:52:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The state of the Dulles Metro project (which is heavy metro BTW) was discussed in the last dKos thread, check it out.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Jul 20th, 2007 at 01:03:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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