Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Wednesday Photography Blog No. 3 [UPDATED]

by LEP Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 04:01:03 AM EST

Welcome to the Wednesday Photography Blog #3. Browsing through the open thread last evening there seemed to be some anticipation for today's blog. That makes me feel happy. So don't be bashful; post a lot of photos and share your art with your fellow ETer's.

I'm looking forward to the return of Ted Welsh whose photos are always interesting. (Unless he's still house hunting in Montpelier.) We've also been promised some entries by a Plutonium lady from Holland; in fact, she's cooking them up just for us today, if the sun is shining; I'm sure it's cold there today since it's only 2 degrees here near Fontainebleau. And to the very talented TZT, please post several of your great photos.

There are no rules except for some technical stuff to follow when posting. See the photo blog #2 by In Wales for everything you need to know on this subject. Update [2007-9-20 12:3:5 by LEP]: A very successful photo blog this week. Lots of quality. If you haven't seen the last several entries, do so now, and give yourself a visual treat.


So excuse me if I'm corny, (this is also the lead in to my photos): LET'S TAKE OFF:

Shot in Brittany, late July, 2007

Shot from the observation tower, Dulles Air and Space museum, October, 2006.

Display:
extraordinaire, In Wales, is traveling today so I'm posting three of her photos on her behalf. I believe she shot these photos last weekend.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 04:22:39 AM EST
Heres the third photo of In Wales.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 08:04:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for putting these up for me LEP!  Great contributions from people to this weeks blog too.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 12:20:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:06:28 AM EST


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:19:03 AM EST
These photos are very interesting, Melo. They seem blurred, almost impressionistic, but when you step away from the computer they become almost 3D. Is that intentional?

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:28:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
i think that might be because i was not still enough.

the snow one was taken with a videocamera, the sunset with samsung 10mb digital. i think the latter captures light better, but by the time they've been flickred, they lose something....looks better in iphoto.

i hadn't noticed the step-away effect, i guess it depends a bit on your monitor, as well...unless it doesn't happen often!



'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 07:58:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a Toshiba 15 inch laptop and the effect is definitely there.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 08:35:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
maybe that's how i see the world...

calls optometrist!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 02:17:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is a project that I worked on at a winery in Napa, CA...

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 11:01:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
gioele... please tell me what your name means...

how is it pronounced?

you are an amazing photographer, thanks for your images...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 02:15:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's the Italian version of the Biblical name Joel, and it's pronounced with a soft 'g' as in Giovanni and and the 'e' on the end is pronounced like a long 'a'...

Thank you for your appreciation of the photos...

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 04:08:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
cool, like joe-el-lay?


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Sep 21st, 2007 at 01:03:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Playing with 10-20mm zoom (equivalent to 14-30mm on my camera).

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:25:54 AM EST

Crane in oak tree/Napa Valley, CA


Robin gorging on persimmon/Napa Valley, CA

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:28:35 AM EST
Still playing

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:30:41 AM EST
Taken in a cave in Clare sometime in the early 1990's, after this chap had just done quite a long crawl through a very low, quite damp, passage.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:36:52 AM EST
Had you gone underground yourself?

This pic brings back memories. Unfortunately, I lost my roll of film of my pitiful endeavours through Ogof Draenen cave in Wales...

by Nomad on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 01:06:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, yes, I'm behind the viewfinder. I'd gone in ahead of the group slightly, dragging my Nikon EM, flash, flash cable and a few lenses in a small Pelican box. I'd been caving a bit for a few years by that stage. That  was the cave we often used for new groups - not very challenging, apart from the crawl, and long enough to make an interesting round trip.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 02:20:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Impressive... The one camera that I dared to take into a cave was my cruddy point-and-click camera which was by that time more than 12 years old and only kept together because of sport tape. I destroyed my watch while caving.

Do we have more fellow (ex)cavers on ET?

by Nomad on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 07:22:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, the EM was pretty cheap, I was using an off-brand manual lens that was also pretty cheap and an off-brand flash. I think the case was the most expensive part of the set-up!
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 07:51:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
clearly in the Ex-caver group (twice the circumference now...)
by PeWi on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 08:13:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tried it a couple of times in my youth, but the person I used to go with got a severe attack of the fear and couldn't handle going underground, so we stuck to climbing for the next few years.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 12:27:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I could swear I have seen this before??  It's a great photo.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 12:22:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Tree fungus on ground/Marin County, CA


Tree fungus/Marin County, CA


Tall degrading mushrooms/Baden-Wurtemburg, Germany (Schwarzwald)

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:40:26 AM EST

Flea markt/Berlin, Germany
by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:52:11 AM EST
Some old favorites:

The Nile River and the Sahara Desert, at Aswan:

The Drei Weiern in the rain:

A great little resaurant in southern Lesbos:



"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia

by whataboutbob on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 05:53:35 AM EST
I don't see any photos in the last two posts. Is there a technical problem?

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 06:06:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's OK now. Strange.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 06:22:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Wild flower/Baden-Württemberg, Germany (Schwarzwald)


Closeup/Home, Sweet home


Rose closeup/Home, Sweet home

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 06:17:05 AM EST
This is a photo of a painting a very close friend of mine did in the sixties: an homage to Magritte. When he died two years ago his wife offered it to me and it's been in my living room for one year.

This is a photo estHer took in music camp 3 weeks ago.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 06:19:16 AM EST

Ferrari-like Mecedes/Mercedes museum, Stuttgart, Germany


First Unimog/Mercedes museum, Stuttgart, Germany

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 07:03:43 AM EST

Hebrew clock/Prague, Czech


Clock/Prague, Czech

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 07:20:16 AM EST
Yesterday was the Prinsjesdag and huge crowds gathered in The Hague to catch a glimpse of the queen and the other royals. I went to photograph the crowds.




These kids in klompjes and old-fashioned clothes were being photographed by lots of people, and the NOS interviewed them for their TV program.








The girls were wearing scarves and dresses and the boys klompjes (wooden shoes), caps, and shirts with nice buttons.





My friend told me that the kids had a "countryside accent" (which I could not notice myself), so I guess they came to the Hague especially for the Prinsjesdag.

I did not get a picture of the queen and her hat, but never mind, I managed to do that a couple of years ago. The crowds were more interesting anyway.

The first three pictures are so-called "hipshots" where you take a picture without looking through the viewfinder. We have an assignment to do those for the school. The fourth one I don't remember if I composed by looking through the viewfinder or not. Probably, or otherwise it's a very lucky hipshot!

They're digital photos converted to black and white. Usually I would use film for street shots, but now I haven't the time since I have to prepare a bunch of assignments for Friday. I'm hoping to get to use more film at school later on. The camera I used, if anyone's interested, is a Canon 350D with a 28mm lens.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--

by tzt (tzt) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 07:39:41 AM EST
Good street photography.  Love the tones and conversion.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 09:07:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, my teacher looked through them today and found them "boring". So.. back to the drawing board camera ..

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Fri Sep 21st, 2007 at 10:57:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What do teachers know? I have a question for you tzt. How do you get such great black and white contrast with a digital image? Do you use photoshop or something comparable?

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Sep 21st, 2007 at 12:19:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Funny you should mention it, Lep; it occurred to me too.

The tonal range is excellent, and the light is luscious.

My guess is that tzt must have taken the images with a very good camera to begin with.

These are super pictures, tzt.

by Loefing on Fri Sep 21st, 2007 at 12:45:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nah, my camera's just an ordinary 350D. I have to admit I make the contrast better in Photoshop at the same time as I convert the digital image from color to black and white.

With film, the contrast usually pretty much is there already.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--

by tzt (tzt) on Fri Sep 21st, 2007 at 01:56:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And by the way most of my black and whites I do with film and use an old entry-level camera: a Canon AE-1. It was manufactured from 1976 to 1884; mine's from 1978. I bought it for five euros a few months ago, and also bought three lenses (50mm f/1.8, 28mm f/2.8 and 35mm f/2.8) for similar silly prices. Photography does not have to be expensive.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Fri Sep 21st, 2007 at 01:59:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Photography does not have to be expensive.

You are right about that. Good prices on those old Canon (I presume, lenses.) One of my favorite cameras is a 6x6cm 120 Twin lens reflex, Seagull 109, that I picked up in China a few years ago.  It cost $200, including a leather case, from the factory in Shanghai but can be had for $279 in the US.  It has an old style taking lens (75mm f3.5) similar to one of the older Zeiss designs and although not as sharp as the newer ones, it's plenty sharp. It is all manual winding and focusing and has no meter but does flash sync up to one 500 hundreths of a  sec through a PC sync connection.  It's light and compact and I've used it with studio strobes and on camera small flash as well as in ambient light situations either estimating exposure or using reflective or incidence meters.  

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Sep 21st, 2007 at 10:35:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lovely! I'm seeing a lot of relatively inexpensive medium format stuff in use nowadays.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Sat Sep 22nd, 2007 at 05:36:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 09:10:59 AM EST
Bristol Zoo.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 09:36:59 AM EST
Business School?

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Fri Sep 21st, 2007 at 06:12:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 10:24:52 AM EST


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 10:25:35 AM EST
Do you have the show, "Meerkat Manor" over there?  It's an actual reality tv soap opera of meerkats.  I watched it for a while, because, how can you not love meerkats, right?  I had to stop watching it.  The cutest animals on the planet subjected to the cruelest forces of nature.  Plus, Tosca, the rebellious young female (imagine that), died.  Awful stuff...  Poor little meerkats.  

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 11:42:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
it's actually a UK show, that has since been picked up worldwide. and they are just too cute.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 11:47:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cool.  I did not know that.  (or maybe I did...)  So now I know who to blame...  Exploiting the suffering of the little meerkats for our own entertainment.  lol.   ;)

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 01:05:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No blame the meerkats, havent you seen the Erich von Stroheim of the meerkat world further down the page?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 01:12:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 10:27:07 AM EST


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 11:28:12 AM EST


Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 11:39:50 AM EST
This photo makes an odd illusion as you scroll down to see it in its entirety.

It seems to inflate!

by Loefing on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 12:48:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

On the way to Esztergom from Budapest. Figured: American artist a French sculptor and a Hungarian photographer.

[We'd had a lot to drink the previous night].

by Loefing on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 01:03:35 PM EST
Wonderful, wonderful photo.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 01:13:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I second that.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 01:47:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The more I look at this photo it the more it could be a still from o a Jean Luc  Godard movie staring Jean Paul Belmondo.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 03:07:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Lol!

But I see what you mean. All three show signs of strong character [which they exhibit in their lives, too, I can assure you].

I really appreciate the attention this photo has received and your comments, LEP et al.

by Loefing on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 11:40:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BTW, and are you one of them? And when was it made? I could have waved you from the shore halfway down.

Also, if the smoking photographer is a pro, could you name him?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 12:12:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I think I'd prefer not to give out details about the photograph.

I even hesitated before publishing the image in such an open forum, because ... well ... one never knows where the information might go. Perhaps in a separate discussion, I could provide more info.

by Loefing on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 02:04:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
OK, understood.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Sep 21st, 2007 at 01:14:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
brilliant photo.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 12:50:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]

(In the deep valley of the Enz river, Austria)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 01:09:03 PM EST

(Looking down from an observatory tower at what was once a volcano crater, Börzsöny mountains, Hungary)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 01:20:37 PM EST
This is a picture taken early this month in the Provence

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 02:56:57 PM EST
From the back of the samba band:

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 03:19:02 PM EST


Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 04:01:13 PM EST
Seen while hiking in the Cévennes in southern France :



Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 09:04:19 PM EST
In 2000 or 2001, I worked for a short time in Hanoi.  These photos are the faces of some of the friendly and hardworking people that I encountered there.


Silk worker in a small village outside Hanoi


Another silk worker in the same factory


A potter in a small village factory also near Hanoi


Mr Minh, a rice farmer, photographed as he and a coworker were taking a break.  We had an interesting conversation and he invited me to share his pipe.  I declined saying that smoking stunted one's growth. He was amused.


One of the many women working in the rice fields with Mr Minh


Cutie from the pottery village


Well, I guess everyone takes a nap. I know I do!


I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Wed Sep 19th, 2007 at 10:31:00 PM EST
Thanks for posting these Gringo. They're wonderful.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 02:26:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks LEP.  Sorry I was so late in getting them in, but the 21 month old terror/love takes all our time and endurance.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 08:42:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
For the fans of Frank Lloyd Wright, Taliesin is ground zero.  Set is the rolling hills of southern Wisconsin near the village of Spring Green, this is still a place where young architects come to learn.

The grounds in the first day of summer 2006.

The courtyard of the main house.

Window detail with Japanese pot in foreground.  Wright was paid a significant sum for designing the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo.  He spent most of the commission on artwork.  This gave him a collection to sell when the Great Depression dried up work.  There is still a lot of that art collection left at Taliesin.

The theater at the design school.  The effect of Japanese culture on Wright's work is obvious here.

A beautiful place and important to the history of architecture.  Unfortunately, it needs about $20 million worth of repair work.  For further information see:

http://www.taliesinpreservation.org/

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 11:33:12 AM EST
Thanks for these photos, techno.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Thu Sep 20th, 2007 at 11:54:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you very much to all, very nice photos. I just opened this thread as I have nothing to do for a couple of hours (waiting for bus to Manali).
I don't know much about photography and it's pity as my photos often rejected in glossy magazines (We don't publish photos where people are looking straight into camera, lad!). And then it's really difficult to make from close distance a view of real emotions, even if there are some emotions as often you don't see any or they are momentary like lightning.
by FarEasterner on Sat Sep 22nd, 2007 at 06:53:06 AM EST
As soon as you are noticed taking photos, you lose the candid nature of the shot and it becomes much harder to capture the essence of the person or the environment.  In the UK every person has the right to take photos of other people in public places, so we don't have to ask for permission but I still feel incredibly rude for photographing people without asking.  

A man once thought I had taken a photo of him (I was actually zooming in on something far behind him) and he got quite angry about it. Fortunately with digital you can prove if you weren't doing something you are accused of.

The best way to get candid shots is to use a lens that is capable of zooming in from a distance, so you are less likely to be noticed.  Then again where that isn't possible, if you are able to build up a rapport with the subject and can get them to pose for a few shots, you may be able to capture something.  I find this easier to do in countries where I am clearly a foreigner and I show the picture to them and usually they are happy to let me go ahead.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Sep 22nd, 2007 at 07:52:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I wish to have good zoom camera but as my friend professional photographer (from National Geographic) say it's not important, the question of paramount importance is to be as close as possible from people who are photographed and then luck - they have to behave naturally which is quite difficult if they are not on demonstration of protest against Bush policies.
by FarEasterner on Sat Sep 22nd, 2007 at 09:20:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Any advice from your friend on how to interact well with people that you are photographing? I can see the logic that being up close allows you to capture an intimacy that is otherwise hard to get, but a fair amount of luck and patience must be involved.  

I suppose if you have the time to spend waiting for a good opportunity or to take hundreds of photos to get one publishable shot then that is less of an issue. I often find I don't have the time to hang about as much as I would like.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Sep 22nd, 2007 at 09:52:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The time is also important, you're right.
Today in Old Manali I was passing an old man in traditional wear with Kullu cap and his beleaguered wife. The man was sitting just behind the road in strategical place where he could see any people coming from new town. Closing I noticed he was taking opium from brass lamp of Alauddin through hookah (long pipe). First time I went further to see quite modern Manu temple. On the way back I wanted to make his photo but he shook his head with disapproval. I smiled and went further - he probably does not want possible problems if his photo appear somewhere.
by FarEasterner on Sun Sep 23rd, 2007 at 01:50:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In the UK every person has the right to take photos of other people in public places, so we don't have to ask for permission but I still feel incredibly rude for photographing people without asking.

Our teacher says that that is what we need to get over. I guess that's why we have the hipshot assignment I mentioned earlier. I'm mostly over it now - I don't feel rude, as long as I am not trying to hide. I never use a telephoto lens or a zoom because those tend to make the shot "flat" and also because it somehow does not feel fair.. the persons I'm photographing don't then have the chance to notice me or to react to me.

Yesterday I went out photographing with a huge, clunky old Polaroid camera. Suddenly nobody cared if I was pointing the camera at them. It's weird - if I have my SLR with me, people notice, but if I have a small point&shoot, they don't care at all, and the same goes for a large Polaroid or even a Hasselblad.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--

by tzt (tzt) on Sun Sep 23rd, 2007 at 07:29:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Our teacher says that that is what we need to get over.

Speaking as some photographers' involuntary photography object, I say that's something you shouldn't get over :-)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Sep 23rd, 2007 at 07:38:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Believe me, I understand your point. But then again, most of so-called social documentary photography or street photography would not exist if photographers were always supposed to ask permission first. (Most of my photographs would not exist either, but that wouldn't be such a loss.. :-p) The picture you get after asking permission is completely different from the one you get before there's contact.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Sun Sep 23rd, 2007 at 01:07:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I just haven't worked out the best approach though. I suppose I should try to look focussed and confident and not as though I am expecting people to put up a fight.

I spent yesterday evening persuading a room full of people to let me take shots of them for my friend for his birthday.  It worked best when I joked with them, took a stupid shot and showed it to them saying surely they wanted to look better than that?!  I don't think that would work in the street though!

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sun Sep 23rd, 2007 at 01:35:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think confidence and looking like you know what you're doing does the trick. And smiling a lot. I'm not good at that, though - I always feel nervous and probably look nervous.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Sun Sep 23rd, 2007 at 03:36:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Perhaps on the next photo blog I'll post photos of people who asked me to take their photo as I was walking  with my Nikon hanging from my neck in the 18th of Paris. They're not great photos; just to follow up this discussion. I already posted one on an open thread of the two guys in the bar I was passing. I do like that one because they made for an "interesting" friendship.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Mon Sep 24th, 2007 at 11:28:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sounds good! Do post them!

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Tue Sep 25th, 2007 at 10:08:24 AM EST
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