Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Thursday Open Thread

by Jerome a Paris Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:05:44 AM EST

The cost of borrowing in dollars for three months in London soared to the highest level this year as coordinated interest-rate reductions worldwide failed to revive lending among banks for any longer than a day.
[Jerome's WEEEEEE™ Technology]


Display:
than the financial crisis happening in the world? What's keeping you busy?

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:18:24 AM EST
Figuring out our family finances...

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:21:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As a consequence of the financial crisis, the offering of stocks of the German Railways on the German stock market was delayed (yet again).

(SPD neolib Peer Steinbrück is hard at work saving capitalism; yesterday he presented an eight-point plan of rule changes to prevent a similar crash as the present one in the future -- involving new regulation requiring greater banker responsibility.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:23:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I would expect that the privatisation of La Poste, which was supposed to get started this autumn (the first phase is only the transformation of the company from its public entreprise status to a limited liability company) is likely to be delayed or postponed as well...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:25:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We were going to sell the 20 % government share of the bank Nordea. I guess that won't be happening now.Too bad really, but that's life for ya.

Though in hindsight, selling Vin&Sprit to Pernod Ricard for like €7 billion looks like the deal of the decade. :)

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:27:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Spain finally privatised all its public banks in 1998 (creating Argentaria which was swiftly - within a year - gobbled up by BBV). And now I wonder why the fuck did we have to privatize all the public banks? Having a Caja Postal available would be very useful.

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:31:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So you are behind all of this crisis. I could have known.

Der Amerikaner ist die Orchidee unter den Menschen
Volker Pispers
by Martin (weiser.mensch(at)googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:21:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not keeping me busy, but it is the non-financial world.

BBC NEWS | Entertainment | Author Le Clezio wins Nobel prize

French novelist Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clezio has been awarded this year's Nobel Prize for Literature.

The 68-year-old has been honoured with the 10m kronor (£820,810) award for his distinguished life's work.

The Swedish Academy describes him as "an author of new departures, poetic adventure and sensual ecstasy."

It goes on to call him "an explorer of a humanity beyond and below the reigning civilisation." British author Doris Lessing won last year's prize.

Le Clezio's breakthrough as a novelist came in 1980 with Desert, a work the Swedish academy praised for its "magnificent images of a lost culture in the North African desert."

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:14:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
British author Doris Lessing won last year's prize.
But you have to make the news relevant to your audience, right?

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:15:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course. As the Newsday put it today
No American has won since Toni Morrison in 1993 and no American was expected to win. Le Clézio did put in a plug yesterday for Philip Roth.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 03:16:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I just saw that and rushed straight over to EuroTrib to ask about this writer. Because even though I'm reasonably well read, on this side of the pond I've never heard of him.

No surprise, I suppose, given that most of the bookstores these days are huge chains full of bad writing by the likes of Nicholas Sparks.

So, what can you tell me about Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clezio? Titles? I'm willing to try reading him in French, but it would go a lot faster if I could do so in English.  

by Mnemosyne on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:47:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I've never heard of him either but then again I don't pretend to be well-read.

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 12:03:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
J.M.G. Le Clézio is a great writer. He started writing "experimental" novels like "Le Procès-Verbal" and later wrote very subtle novels about themes like travel and childhood ("Désert"). He lived several years among Central America Indians and translated some of their mythology.

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 12:50:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you. A quick search of Amazon says all his books are in French, mostly very expensive (even used). If I were to get one to read in French (bearing in mind that it would be slow, with my dictionary close at hand), which would you recommend?
by Mnemosyne on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:06:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suggest to start with "Désert". It's a wonderful novel.

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:21:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Also "Le chercheur d'or" (based on his family's history in Mauritius) is a good pick. Also, "Onitsha" (based on his father's work as a doctor in Nigeria).

Seems like very few of his novels have been translated to English; maybe this will change after the Nobel...

His Wikipedia entry is quite complete, although it's missing its latest novel "Ritournelle de la faim", published earlier this year.

by Bernard on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:43:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you. I checked in at the local Borders tonight, and they have some things listed, although nothing in stock. The reference desk man said he thought there would soon be reprints available, given the award.

Because the titles are often changed when a translation is published, I couldn't tell for sure if one of the two I was looking for was already in English.

I'll keep looking. Perhaps I can get two copies, one in French and another in English to help me along.

I know a tiny bit about Mauritius, so that one might be an interesting read.

by Mnemosyne on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:05:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Looks like they have some paperbacks and used copies at more decent prices on barnesandnoble.com, including  Onitsha, Wandering Star {Etoile Errante) and The Round and Other Cold Hard Facts (La Ronde et autres faits divers).

The Prospector (Le chercheur d'or) is on powells.com, but on backorder.

by Bernard on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:05:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of my favorite French language writers; I was just reading "Ourania" these days; I'll try to finish tonight....

JMG Le Clezio first breakthrough in France was as early as 1963 when he was awarded the Renaudot prize.

by Bernard on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:33:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not something else:
Yesterday Keynes was mentioned by our PM in Paliament. Must have been a first.
On the same vein, last Monday, on a tv debate one of the Business Bosses mentioned the eventual desirability of having a few years (no for ever!) of (grab your seats) Planned Economy.
Strange days, indeed.
by Torres on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:14:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Don't worry, this is not communism"

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:16:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No, if a captain of industry calls for it, it is not. Must be something else, maybe similar but without the evil.
by Torres on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:58:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's the New Industrial State of Galbraith.

Captains of industry Haven't been seen since the times of Veblen :-)

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 12:01:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yesterday Keynes was mentioned by our PM in Paliament. Must have been a first.

How long until they mention Marx?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:42:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Groucho?

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:00:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, funny world where one could actually imagine that the leader of a party named Socialist would more associate at an American comedian...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:28:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From Duck Soup

Finance Minister:  [This meeting] must take-up the tax.

Groucho: I think we should take-up the carpet.

Finance Minister:  I insist we take-up the tax.

Groucho's Secretary: He's right.  We have to take-up the tacks before we take-up the carpet.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:37:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
VERY appropriate for Parliament: He's the guy who said:

"I refuse to join any club that would have me as a member."

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt ät gmail dotcom) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:58:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and something else non-financial and I don't know what to think about it. :-)

A seven-course chocolate tasting menu? Including fish? - Features, Food & Drink - The Independent

Located in the fashionable streets of north London, Almeida restaurant and bar is exactly the sort of establishment you'd expect to offer trendy one-off menus and exciting, fresh ingredients. Squab pigeon... yes. Smoked eel and oysters... almost certainly. Butternut squash velouté... a must. Fine chocolate in every course... really?

To mark National Chocolate Week, which begins on Monday, Almeida's head chef Alan Jones and award-winning chocolatier Paul A Young are doing just that by joining forces to create an indulgent seven-course chocolate-tasting menu.

For one week only, diners will be able to feast on butternut squash velouté with a Venezuelan chocolate and cumin stirrer, smoked eel and oyster in chocolate vinaigrette and brill with a hazelnut and coco crust. The £60 meal continues with roast pigeon and candied carrots and an Amedei Toscano black chocolate jus. Dessert of poached figs with white, milk and dark chocolate comes after a cheese-and-(yes)-chocolate course and a kitsch pre-dessert of chocolate ice cream, almonds, fudge, cacao nibs, hundreds and thousands and marshmallows.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:19:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Accompanied by chocolate stout beer I trust.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:23:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have good news.

Back home, we've grown used to seeing factories shut down.

But yesterday, we got some good news.  An Italian wind turbine manufacturer announced that it's building a plant in my hometown.

MUNCIE, Ind. - An Italian company that manufactures wind turbines plans to bring more than 450 jobs to the Muncie area, officials announced Wednesday.

Brevini USA will move its U.S. headquarters to a business park near Interstate 69 in western Delaware County and build its first U.S. factory at the site, state and company officials announced at a news conference......

The Muncie-area business development group Energize-ECI Inc. said Brevini would invest more than $60 million and create about 450 jobs with annual pay averaging more than $46,000.  

I think that there's a (lamentable) lack of understanding of industrial cluster theory as a an economic development strategy back home, but I think that this could be the start of something big. Wind turbines are large, and it makes a lot of sense to cluster manufacturing process to avoid shipping tons of metal around the country.

And the location of Muncie is ideal, because it's on a major interstate, and there's going to be a rail spur to the site.

Reading this was a pleasant surprise.  I know what getting in early did for Pamplona and Vittoria when the boom in Spanish wind came.  It can be a huge growth industry.  My only concern is that the "demand destruction" being wrought by the market crisis will put backward pressure on green energy projects like windpower and the push for plug in hybrids like the Volt.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:44:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought Brevini was based in the UK, but anyway they don't manufacture wind turbines.  They make planetary gearboxes for yaw and pitch drives.  These are the drives which turn the blades to the proper angle of attack depending on the wind (pitch), and which rotate (yaw) the entire nacelle to as close to perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction as possible, through the command of the central controller software.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:40:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course, i forgot to write, that's great for your town, and another example of how serious renewable energy development creates real local jobs, throughout the entire supply chain, not just in the windy areas.  An economic boon in real terms.


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:44:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In an article in the Arkansas Democrat Gazette today, 10-9-08, a Dutch wind-blade manufacturer, Polymarin Composites and one of its suppliers, Wind Water Technology, announced plans to create about 830 jobs in the Little Rock area over the next four years.  Last year Danish manufacturer LM Glasfiber broke ground on a $150 million plant at the Port of Little Rock.

Polymarin will move into the former Levi Strauss distribution center on I 530. Both Polymarin and LM Glasfiber value the inland water shipping capability that the Port of Little Rock provides via the Arkansas River and its connections to the Mississippi and the Gulf of Mexico.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:50:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow.  The second European wind company's move to amurka to hit tonight's OT.  What is the world coming to?  (Hint:  after decades of poisoned sleep, amurka is the world's numero uno wind markt.)

Unfortunately, it's also the home of Mordor-like entrenched lobbies and their media slaves.  Al Gore isn't powerful enough to get his paid ad played after the last debate, but the oilers and coalers were OK.

Readers here can't imagine what it's like to see your entire life's work finally being vindicated, yet knowing the biggest battles are yet to come.  (Or can they?)

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:05:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
recently a note of Vestas's opening of a big factory in Colorado, as well as Siemens's opening in Iowa?

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:21:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Since 2005, i believe there are some three dozen new factories which have opened or are opening, from blade manufacturing, through turbine assembly, to several dedicated tower rollers.  Vestas, Gamesa, Acciona, Suzlon, on and on.  Of course home-grown Clipper is employing thousands in their new factories/site workers.  Even nuclear supplier TECO Westinghouse has a new assembly facility in Texas to produce the 60hz DeWind turbines.

And that doesn't include the expansion of component suppliers, whose ramp-up is not calculated as yet.

hell, even Deutsche WindGuard has a north american presence, and is looking for qualified techs.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:43:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And that doesn't include the ramp-up of the entire service industry, from several dozens of new cranes being built each year, to the entire technical operations industry being built (including at least a half dozen community colleges now with specific windpower training programs).  Not to mention the transport industry, to get the big things around, by ship and truck.  Did i forget to mention the hundreds of thousands of concrete truck cycles pouring the foundations?

Or the onsite construction workers?

What have i left out?  (Ohh, the lawyers and dealmakers.)

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:54:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hey, that my intellectual property you stole up there, commie. ;)

[Drew's WHEEEEE™ Technology]

Damned French.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:47:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
August data is out: year-on-year, exports fell 2.5% while imports rose 2.6%, to reduce the August trade balance from €14.3 billion to €10.6 billion. Most of the import reduction and export increase is to/from outside the EU, so I'm not sure a trend of further reduction can be easily assumed, with the fall of the Euro since countering the downturn in the USA.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:19:10 AM EST
Not to forget the oil price was higher back then as well.

Der Amerikaner ist die Orchidee unter den Menschen
Volker Pispers
by Martin (weiser.mensch(at)googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:52:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We were given an update by my CEO on the current events in the financial world. I won't go into any details here, obviously, but I thought I'd mention that he said "nobody could have predicted this crisis (blablabla) no expert ever imagined that it could be that bad..."

Sigh. How do we get more Serious PeopleTM to read eurotrib?

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:22:29 AM EST
Was it impossible for you to counter him?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:23:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Questions were allowed, but in a tightly controlled way. I did get to ask him one, but I did not comment on that particular bit.

The union guys asked the hardest-hitting questions, explicitly saying that others probably did not dare ask them...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:26:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I guess you have not been able to communicate your worries to the higher ups? I mean, you've been going on about this for like three years.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:28:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I spend my time on my deals. Management is too political for me.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:52:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Plus there's supposed to be a risk department whose job it is to predict (or at least stress-test) these things.

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:13:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Haha.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:30:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was talking to someone who used to work for an SIV. At one point he wan involved in figuring out scenarios under which their portfolio would blow up. One of the scenarios was "worldwide market outage lasting 4 weeks or more". Of course that scenario was looked at by the appropriate senior person and signed off as 'acceptable risk'. And of course that's what happened in August last year.

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:34:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Information Processing in Business

The Claim (Hutchinson Operator):

[W(A) U a1(w1) U a2(w2) ... an(wn), n = 1, 2, 3 ....] such that SIWIGO = 1

Where:

W = Repertoire of Operations on the data
w = Selected operation
A = Total data stream
a = Selected data
SIWIGO = Some Idea of What Is Going On.

What Really Happens:

[WB(BA) U ab1(wb1) U ab2(wb2) ... abn(wbn), n = 1, 2, 3 ....] such that  SIWIGO = {}

Where:

WB = Repertoire of Operations on the data allowed by the Big Bosses

wb = Selected operation on data by little bosses to confirm the prejudices and preconceptions of the Big Bosses

AB = Total data stream selected to confirm the prejudices and preconceptions of the Big Bosses

ab = Selected data specifically chosen to confirm the prejudices and preconceptions of the Big Bosses

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:26:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Starvid naively asks, "I guess you have not been able to communicate your worries to the higher ups?"

Don't know about France.  In the US telling the truth or questioning higher ups is a sure ticket to unemployment for white collar workers.  A 'blue collar' worker is simply ignored; after all, if that person knew anything they'd be a white collar worker.  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:06:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Someone who can say that kind of thing is so duplicitous or so dumb, or both, that reading ET would do nothing for her/im.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:49:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
All the Serious People say it, though. It's a requirement to be a Serious People, I think, actually...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 10:53:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]

How does it feel to be
One of the Serious People?
Now that you know who you are
What do you want to be?
And have you traveled very far?
Far as the eye can see.
How does it feel to be
One of the Serious People?
How often have you been there?
Often enough to know.
What did you see, when you were there?
Nothing that doesn't show.
Baby you're a rich man,
Baby you're a rich man,
Baby you're a rich man too.
You keep all your money in a big brown bag inside a zoo.
What a thing to do.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:21:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not having to live in reality seems to be an implicit job requirement at that level.

Still - it must be galling to work for such a total noob.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:24:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Whenver I see "no-one could have predicted..." I remember Bill Maher's rant about Iraq which can be summarised as "when you've been so wrong for so long regarding just about everything, you have to stop making predictions".

This applies especially to Francis Fuk-u-uppa, who writes in the Guardian too often for my liking (about once every 3 months is far far too often).

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:56:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
These "Serious People" have to see some benefit to themselves in investing their time at ET.  Perhaps people in the upcoming Obama administration will take some of ETs ideas and run with them.  They'll have financial problems that the old bullshit won't address and the population will be looking for effective answers (or at least possibilities) to the chaos.

Question: What does ET offer a US population in turmoil, after the election?  Time to get the concepts/arguements/etc. organized.  Time to become a bonafide "Think Tank"?  Obama Time less than a month away.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 12:11:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not going to make a difference if Obama is president. His economic people are hardcore neo-libs who think that "education" is the key to this crisis.  They don't question the premise that the market is God.

I honestly think that an Obama presidency may do more harm than a McCain one would.

Because, McCain will be kept on a leash.  Obama will not, and the cultish impulse means that dissent will be punished.  So there will likely be less room for challenging the wisdom of current economic policy then than there is now.  And with Rubin and friends running the show, there is no chance that they are going to take Wall Street on.

And in the end, this will serve to discredit the Left on economic issues. And that means more of the same.    


And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:34:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Obama might be forced into into action. The US government, while willing to use force, is terrified of civil unrest.

McCain's thirst for WW3 wouldn't be good for the economy either.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:38:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Very good MillMan, VERY GOOD!

Give Obama options which AT LEAST have a chance at turning things around.  That's what America will want, and ineffective bullshit won't cut it.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:55:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, that's one opinion I TOTALLY disagree with.

NEXT!

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:52:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NEXT!

This is precisely the reason that nothing will change.  

Because the moment that anyone expresses an inkling of doubt, it's SYFPH.

And that's not going to cut it when there is a serious economic crisis underway.

I have no doubt that an Obama Presidency would see the passage of the Employee Free Choice Act, but I doubt that there's going to commitment to the level of market regulation that's needed to deal with the root problem.  

Markets are not self-regulating.  Acting as though they are means encourages corrupt behavior, and ridiculous schemes like the derivates swindle to develop.  

This is fully understood by those who encourage deregulation, and then when it becomes clear that markets have become little more than the mega-casinos of the "serious people" they acted shocked, just shocked, at the corruption going on.

Pressing working people into compromise with the "serious people" on Wall Street is like asking chickens to make a deal with Col. Sanders.  

But instead of focusing on the rape of the American economy, we've been swept up in a feel good campaign about whether this election is going to be historic for because it put a women or a black man into a position of power.

Now millions may be left without work, hundreds of thousands without homes, and a nation without real hope.  

But don't you see that doesn't matter, because this campaign is going to be historic however it ends up.  It's a damn shame that those without homes can't sleep beneath the shadow of history, and that those who go hungry can't eat it.  But it's history that we'll have, and the consequences for humanity be damned.

And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:40:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
  1. What does it actually mean, who does what, when you request "But instead of focusing on the rape of the American economy ..."?  Are you saying you are dissatisfied with the "themes" of the Obama campaign?

  2. If you are interested in feeding and housing people, your solution is ... what? "Focus on the rape of the American economy"?  Who does that feed or house?  How?


They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:58:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
1.  Nationalization is the answer.  Neither candidate is willing to admit that, at least in the short term, broad sections of the US economy need to be nationalized through the purchase of the entire business by the government.  I'm not talking about equity, I'm talking about ownership.  This isn't compromise, this is a real solution.  

It isn't just banks.  GM closed below $5 today.  The time has come for the government to take a controlling stake in GM and get rid of the current management.  The collapse of GM would lead to wages in the sector being dropped to the Delphi rate that's about half what the wage is now.  The transplants will follow.  Toyota in Kentucky was caught with its pants down on this one about 2 years back.  Honda has always refused to match wages in the auto sector. The collapse of wages in the auto sector means depression, because it will create a downward spiral on wages in the areas this plants have been built.

The end result?  Depression level unemployment in Michigan and the Midwest as demand is destroyed in those regions.  Unemployment is at or near 9% in Michigan, and in auto cities in Indiana.  If you slash wages in the auto factories, people are going to default on their house, and they sure the fuck aren't going to be eating out or going to shop.  Demand destruction results in the resulting reductions in supply.  If people lose their jobs, then the people who made the products that the job losers lose their jobs too.  It's a cycle of destruction.  Same thing with wage cuts.

I'm sorry, but I don't see an adequate appreciation for the gravity of the situation from either Obama or McCain.  We've got Al Smith running against Herbert Hoover, and we're starting economic calamity down. Forgive me for being less than ecstatic about the prospects of the election to actually make a difference.


And I'll give my consent to any government that does not deny a man a living wage-Billy Bragg

by ManfromMiddletown (manfrommiddletown at lycos dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 07:56:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Much buzz in the US that Obama might be assassinated. This has been going on since he entered the race last year.

Remember, the US is run by a one-party, two-party system. Unlike Janus, the two faces are posed looking the same direction: downward at the tax revenue of the US Treasury.

Share. Share resources, share delight, share burdens, share the healing. If we only could realize that sharing will bring us back from mass suicide.

by Isis on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:42:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
they thought they had found the perpetual motion money machine, the holy grail of capitalist fantasies.

no-one can make water run uphill, but they succeeded beyond their wildest dreams in making capital do just that!

icarus flew too close to the sun, and gravity took over.

some of them are just covering their asses feigning naivete, having safely offshored their profits ahead of time.

"who me? how could i have known, do you expect me to go scrape the internet for wild-eyed prophecies to clue me in?"

er, yes actually... it's called due diligence

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:36:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
they're still hooked on crappy sources, need more time and crises to motivate them to drill deeper for news-they-can-use.

now you'll be blogging more to celebrate our new readers, and help them up to speed!

welcome new eyeballs, you have arrived...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:11:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
to check my tutoring fliers.

Getting a late start.  Still coolish out.  Have to lock the cat in; tends to follow me when I walk down the road.

Oh yeah, DOW's DOWN 156.  OOOPS!  On to the 8000's.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:06:31 AM EST
It's turning into another bloodbath this afternoon.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:42:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Jesus, in the time it took me to go refill my cup of water ten feet away, it dropped another 100 points.  This is nuts.  Do I hear 8500?  8400?  Bueller?  Bueller?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:49:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]


you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:54:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
cat
more animals

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:40:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Away from all the doom and gloom, it's been a lovely day here near london with a forecast of a few more to come.

The downside was that my mother has decided that a lot of work needs to be done in the garden while the sun shines and I got volunteered to do it.

today hedge trimming.

fortunately I've got a good excuse to be away for the next three days - job hunting.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:20:56 AM EST
Good luck with the job hunting!
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:28:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you going to job fayres or something? good luck.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:22:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, there's a two day job fiar for the non-profit sector. There seem to be a lot of people there I might be interested in, so I'm gonna take my time, go to a couple of good seminars (how to do a cv !! - me need lots) and work my way around. (should I say network ??).

I'm very much out of practice at this so there's a certain element of interview practice and ensuring I know how best to present myself in 1 - 1 conversations. Also, my cv is crud so I'm looking for help (which is available there).

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:26:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It sounds useful. Is there a fee for it?  I hope you get something practical out of it.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:40:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's free, or at least I've got free tickets. I'm giving one to Mig and we're going together tho' I imagine we'll be going in different directions once inside.

I've not run out of cash yet, but I will unless I do something soon.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:54:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You know, I'm wondering whether there'll be any jobs for me there. Everytime I look at nonprofit job websites I come away disappointed.

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:56:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good luck for both of you.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:57:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a brand new iMac.  It is gorgeous!  I can hardly believe it. I have no software really for it at the moment, on the lookout for CS2 for macs, but I should be able to buy a cheap version of office 2007 for students through the OU.

To mac users... which are the end and home keys?

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 12:51:39 PM EST
If you don't have other sources, Adobe does student deals too...
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:06:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have some important basics... firefox and someone's TribExt add on.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:21:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How much can you get office for ? I live on wordpad, but i think I need to become more proficient with excel and access to pad my cv.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:22:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
60 day trial I think

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:27:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Microsoft would never be so dumb as to actually sue anyone using office illegally...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 08:30:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bill Gates is on record on a BBC interview in saying he'd much rather you used a pirated copy of his software than use one of his opponents products.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 08:35:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Its called mindshare. Once people are used to your software they won't want the hassle of changing and there is always a possibility that they will have to upgrade to a legit copy at some stage.

Vote McCain for war without gain
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 09:01:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More importantly, the goal is making it much easier for companies (who might realistically get sued) to use Office, for which the workforce is already trained, rather than one of the free competitors.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 09:12:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Software for personal use is increasingly free and expected to be so - its only when deployed by corporates that charging and suing becomes realistic

Vote McCain for war without gain
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 09:27:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Which Apple keyboard do you have?

Do you have the big one like this one or the small one like this one?

I just purchased the wired big one and am very happy with it. It's the best keyboard I've ever used in 30 years of computering.

by Magnifico on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:24:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have the big one although the names on some of the keys are different.  It is so lovely.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:34:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Right, I don't know why Apple doesn't show a UK keyboard on their UK website. Here is a picture (the top keyboard) of what I think you have.

Okay if it is anything like the American keyboard, then the home and end keys are the two keys directly above the arrow keys. So to the left of the keypad and to the right of the alpha-numeric keys, then up.

The behavior of the keys are a bit different on a Mac than on other operating systems. So if you're new to a Mac and are accustomed to different behavior, it can be changed. You may need to use the Terminal (application in utilities) and a Unix text editor (like pico, nano, or vi) to make these changes, rather then the GUI text editor.

I'm on a Windows box right now at work and cannot check my Mac at home.

by Magnifico on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:50:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's the one. Never had a mac before but I'm not fussed about resetting the keys or anything, I'll get the hang of it quick enough.

The thing I find really difficult to get used to is the fact that the letters are central on the keys, on pc keyboards they are off centre.  For some reason my brain keeps thinking that the letters are upside down on my mac keyboard.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:55:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Home=apple key+left arrow

End=apple key+right arrow

Option+left or right arrow will move you one word either direction

Apple key+up or down arrow will take you to to the top/bottom of the doc or page

Check out the "keyboard shortcuts" in the 'help menu', they're incredibly helpful....

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:48:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
thanks for the tip.  I think I have worked out which ones are the option and apple keys!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:56:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ahh, on yours the command key (with the funny clover) is the apple key and the alt key is the option key.

If you go to the apple icon on the upper right of your screen and click on it, then click on 'System Preferences', wait till a window opens, then click on 'international', then click 'input menu' and then click on the 'keyboard viewer' box you can enable the keyboard viewer icon on the top right of your menu (should be a little UK flag icon). Once you do this you can click on the flag and open the keyboard viewer which allows you to see in real time what the combination of keys that you push will type. All those crazy symbols that you don't need until you need them and required you to memorize an ascii code in Windows.

If you want to change the keyboard layout to another language you can do this also in the international section of system preferences. Once enabled you can use the native Mac spell checker in other languages. To open the spell check window hit 'cmd+shift+semicolon', and to change the language click on the menu there....

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:16:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:22:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You've come into the light then?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:58:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've never been anti-mac, just anti itunes. And still am.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:13:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I use iTunes only as  a player for my music that I have loaded from CDs.

I don't/won't buy songs from the itunes store.

I won't buy any crap with DRM and as long as I don't then iTunes leaves me alone to use my music as I see fit.

I also use it to interface with my iPhone and it works great....

Why don't you like iTunes? Because of the store?

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:22:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Many moons ago I had an ipod and downloaded itunes to my mac.  Aside from the amount of space it takes up when it is running I object to not being allowed to transfer music I have paid for onto new computers, new MP3 players etc because of the coding on music downloaded through itunes.  It forces you to stick with apple products.  I found an itunes burner and it took weeks bit by bit to transfer my music to MP3.

I don't intend to get an iphone and certainly won't be buying any ipods again or buying music through itunes.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:26:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
iTunes ate my music library. I will never, ever forgive it for that, or let it anywhere near my music again, except under laboratory conditions.

On the other hand, I did buy an iPhone today. I talked to an editor who was desperate for iPhone tutorials, and for a reasonably decent per-hour I can churn out a few of those, pay off the phone and the contract, and win overall.

I'd still have preferred a Nokia or something else with a real-ish keyboard, but no one wants tutorials for those.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:08:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is iPhoto as dangerous as iTunes?

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:10:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
<slumps at keyboard, too depressed to bang head off desk>
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:18:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I haven't spent a lot of time with it, but I don't remember it being obnoxious - photos don't have DRM and you should always be able to do a straight file copy to a different computer/file location if you want to back them up or use a different editor.

The problem with iTunes is that it's designed to lock you into the iTunes filing system. I don't think iPhoto does that - it probably couldn't even if it wanted to, without causing outrage, horror and bad words.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:20:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can't answer that, I don't have the comparative data.

But I will say my experience is that once your iPhoto library reaches a certain size (for me, as I remember, it was about 1000 photos, but it may depend on the size of the files created by your camera) you should always be taking regular backups of it, as bad things can happen.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:21:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i'm almost up to 1000, and so far so good, although it's getting a bit sluggish.

thanks for reminding me to back them up!

i've heard iPhoto horror stories too.

oh yeah, in wales, keep 10G empty on your hard drive, and repair permissions every week or so.(in Disc Utility, in the Applications folder, in the Utilities folder), especially if you have downloaded anything from the net.

OS X needs 10G of free space to operate correctly.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:04:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Seconded.  I know several people who overloaded their IPhoto directories, and had constant problems.

On a related note, I refuse to Mac computers, stemming from my basic and complete incompatibility with the Mac interface, a problem I've had since childhood, before Windows had been invented.

I switched from WMP to iTunes a few years ago due to the horrible shuffle system on WMP.  When you'd skip a song, it would always go right back to that song after it finished the one you skipped, so I was constantly drug back to a song I didn't want to listen to at that moment.  iTunes does not have that problem.  All of my music is off CD's and such non-protected sources, so I've really not had the problems that some have reported.  I was aware of its drawbacks before I started using it, and have been keen to avoid them.

by Zwackus on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:47:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I never worked out how to plug the ipod in without it automatically synching to the library - which meant that I couldn't move my music collection off itunes to free up space on the HDD because it would have wiped everything from the ipod.  Those little things...

My sister managed to lose her entire music collection from itunes too.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:14:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Was it iTunes for Windows?

If so, I'd not blame it on the tunes but on BG and his crapware...

;-p

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:31:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, it was on a Mac.

BG has a plenty to answer for, but the crappiness of iTunes isn't on his burn-in-hell list. ;)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:44:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Itunes is the one piece of software that Is truly, truly abysmal, I did make the mistake of installing it, having been told that it was the easiest way of converting between formats. what I hadnt been told was it has an utterly, utterly rediculous way of organising your files. whereas every other piece of music software downloads an albumn into a single folder, iTunes stupidly uses the artist names as folder labels, so if you have a couple of tracks  labeld as being by an artist featuring another artist, they dont get stored as part of the album Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh. leaves you sort of marooned on iTunes, or with a broken storage structure on everything else.  Or the fact that every now and then, for no good reason, it duplicates half my music in its own database so suddenly  I have two versions of almost every track. and the only way to remove them is by hand.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:38:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
my fave itunes 'DUH' is it gives you the option of finding duplicates, it finds them, but then you can't destroy them with one click, you have to do it one by one....DUH!!!!
the podcast feed sucks pretty good too.

my ipod died after two months, weak.

now i have a zoom h2, which is a great little stereo live recorder as well as flash drive WAV or mp3 recorder/player.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 08:55:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I just asked a Finnair pilot friend to acquire an H2 for me on his next flight East - some 110 € I believe.

I've been talking to some sound engineers with hands-on knowledge of the H2. There's a lot of handling noise, so a little tripod is essential, and the ext. mic preamps are crap apparently. But I have some side jobs where it'll make life a lot easier and pay for itself with the first one.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 05:17:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
it comes with a little tripod, and a windglove.

the onboard mikes are outstanding, so no need for external. i have recorded using line in and it's fine.

the best attribute is the ability to dump WAV files straight to the puta, and v.v.

burn a cd of rehearsal in minutes! or throw it on a usb drive.

watch the sensitivity switch. high can distort easy. low is real low.

it's light, small, tough, and good on battery power, rechargeable AA's last 2-3 hrs, and it takes bigger flash drives, tho' i am happy with 2G.

sweet lil gizmo, especially at the price.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 06:13:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wait till 09, Nokia have some amazing business phones coming out. Can't tell you details though - NDA ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:10:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it's too late.  the iPhone is already both sorting out its release probs, and the updates and next gen are simply too advanced.  the actual problem is not with the phones, but with the providers.  3G ain't sorted yet, but when it works, it's awesome.

people talk/write about not having a keyboard.  when you've learned the system, it's much speedier, intelligent writing software, and the easiest path to detailed...

oh shit, i hate to get into apple discussions.  the advantages are so serious, and the opposition so blind, it tears my heart.

Let me put it this way, and now i'm talking about Mac systems as well as the iPhone, but i save thousands of euros a year by not dealing with shit.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:18:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Crazy Horse:
people talk/write about not having a keyboard.  when you've learned the system, it's much speedier, intelligent writing software, and the easiest path to detailed...

Would you want to write and edit a thousand words on it?

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:33:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
who writes and edits a thousand words (i assume in one doc) on a phone?  for emails and sms its a dream.  after a few hours its second nature, and for me at least, far quicker.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:50:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've done that on a Communicator more than a few times, and I used to do it on a pocketable Psion. It wasn't as fast or convenient as a laptop, but sometimes a laptop isn't convenient. Or possible.

The Communicator wasn't so bad for emails or sms either. It was also pretty damn convenient as an extended-form idea pad. Notepad is not an equivalent, for all kinds of reasons.

So - less of the 'blind' please. Sometimes if someone doesn't instantly love an Apple product to absolute bits, there may be good practical reasons for that.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 07:29:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
TBG, you're an exception to the rule.  Most of us don't have your experience with all kinds of devices.  This one, the iPhone, is simply a treasure to most of us.  It makes reading and responding on the internet so easy for us, with software i call elegant.

I bow to those with far more experience, but in the world-view of unsophisticated but harried drones like me, this is a dream.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 07:40:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
For those of us who are optically challenged, handwriting recognition is the only way to input text. My SE 910i has a large screen - the bottom half produces lower case, the centre produces caps, and numbers at the top. Though if I need umlauts and special characters I have to switch 'keyboard'.

There was a short learning curve, but I soon got to do it without looking at the screen - which is what I do to surreptitiously make notes in meetings occasionally. I prefer to go to meetings 'naked' - just face, hands and voice. Invite me into a meeting room with heads buried behind laptop screens and I'll ask them 'why didn't we do this online?'

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 02:55:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I've done a couple of hundred, with my big mutant thumbs. Now, I was sitting on a beach with C asleep in my lap and I had very little else to do,  but it is doable. The text didn't need much more clean-up when I was done, though I wouldn't be doing final editing on it, or any other device that small.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 03:03:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
itunes is a hulking piece of sh*t excuse for a software package. Much like the ultra-bloatware adobe acrobat reader.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:27:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have good reasons for hating it then.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:57:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've got the latest version of OpenOffice on my mac and it is a good free open source substitute for those of us who don't want to give any money to the MicroSoft goliath.

OpenOffice.org

I also use Gimp for image editing, another open source product, instead of PS. Works great for me....

Gimp

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:59:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've used gimp before.  I'm after CS2 and bridge for the tagging and filing options plus the general editing.

Didn't know about OpenOffice, thanks for that tip.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 02:15:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
CS2 is up to CS4, which is being released Nov/Dec.

CS2 can be slow and cranky, especially when starting up. CS3 is somewhat smoother. I have a beta of CS4 somewhere, but betas make me nervous so I'm waiting for the full version before I try it out.

From what I've heard CS4 has a few nice new features, but Photoshop itself isn't incredibly spiffed up or different.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:13:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I meant CS3.  I heard that CS4 is due out soon.  I can get a student discount through the college but still, it's expensive.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:16:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ouch, still £177 thats not cheap.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:42:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
£177 isn't an unfair price for Photoshop.

Photoshop Elements is about £80, but I could never get my brain around the Elements approach. It's like most of Photoshop, only - not.

Also, the filing system is so bad that I can't even think about it without clutching my head and making pitiful weeping sounds.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:48:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I bought Elements for my daughter, tried it out myself and went back to PS. The stitching algorithm was the only thing that impressed me in Elements.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 02:58:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not cheap but as TBG says still a fair price and I need that software.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 04:37:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't bother with commercial stuff - download the very serviceable Open Office free. http://www.openoffice.org/

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:43:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What happens when I need to open MS office based documents?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 04:38:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You can.

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 04:41:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You can also ask people to please save word focuments as RTF and spreadsheets as CSV. There is little justification for producing a working document that can't be supported by those two formats.

If you're unfortunate enough to get an Office2007 document (file extensions ending with 'x') you can find conversion tools on the web. In fact they are not compatible with earlier versions of Office so even if you were on Windows XP you'd have trouble and people need to know better. But of course, if they are running Vista and Office2007 they don't know better.

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 04:49:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm familiar with the problems caused by docx files, we've been upgraded to 2007 at work.

I suspect I am unlikely to really need to get MS office given how little I use it at home anyway - plus if I did need it my laptop is still fine. I got the mac mainly for photo editing.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 05:01:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Though i do use Pages, which opens most anything, i also use the mac version of Open Office, which is NeoOffice. A bit clugy, but get's the job done.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 05:47:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The point is that if you have trouble using Office documents on your Mac it's Microsoft's fault, not Apple's.

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 06:36:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I've tried installing OpenOffice, but I'm not sure how best to get started with it - it seems to be freezing for a bit when I click on the icon.

Is textedit part of it?

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 06:41:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I believe Open Office comes packaged with a bunch of X11 applications. Textedit might be one of them.

It takes a while to open Open Office on my MacBook - you have to realise that "office productivity" software is inevitably bloatware. When I need to write a letter I use TeX. It runs way faster, looks prettier and produces smaller files.

A vivid image of what should exist acts as a surrogate for reality. Pursuit of the image then prevents pursuit of the reality -- John K. Galbraith

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 06:49:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Perhaps I'm being too impatient then, since everything else is so quick.

the X11 box thing comes up and the textedit but none of the others. Off for the weekend soon so I'll try again when I'm back.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 07:17:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Textedit is a standard Mac OS X app. Your Staroffice isn't working right.

I gave up on it: I use Pages generally, and I have a copy of Office '07 for emergencies.

I wouldn't bother buying Office unless I was actually having problems on a regular basis.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 07:22:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
welcome to macworld!

i dunno about the home key, but the end (i think i know what you mean) is apple (command) right arrow.

top of page is apple up arrow.

i have an imac for my music right now, it is a thing of utter beauty. (fetish alert!)

you actually have a bunch of good software on it already. wait till you see your pix up on that screen!

if it's brand new, it has leopard on it as OS, right?

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:44:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Recommended Diaries list appears to be stuck or broken. There hasn't been any movement on it now for the past three days, despite some diaries that are more recent and have more recommends than some of those on the current list.
by Magnifico on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:16:27 PM EST
Ii have mentioned that privately to the powers that be :)

A pleasure

I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:10:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just to signal we are on the ball, we are trying to find if there is an error in the code, or any recent change tat affects the recommended diary ranking but haven't found anything so far.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:14:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
To pile on your worries - or possibly hinting at a common fault - the recomend list also shows fake new comments. For some reason it is counting the comments twice.

Right now I see it as:

the sad tale of a boring banker in exuberant times... and...
by Jerome a Paris - Oct 6
114 comments (57 new)

LQD: Banking crisis showdown: Norway versus Sweden (and the...
by Trond Ove - Oct 6
48 comments (24 new)

The Basic Income - A solution for the European Union's...
by Martin - Oct 6
106 comments (53 new)

while the relevant portion of new diaries read:

the sad tale of a boring banker in exuberant times... and...
by Jerome a Paris - Oct 6
57 comments

The Basic Income - A solution for the European Union's...
by Martin - Oct 6
53 comments

LQD: Banking crisis showdown: Norway versus Sweden (and the...
by Trond Ove - Oct 6
24 comments



Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 07:48:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Celebrating First People: No Columbus Day: Saturday - Monday at NION.

Everyone is welcome.

Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other. -- Dr Johnson

by melvin (melvingladys at or near yahoo.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 01:21:29 PM EST
As I'm typing, there is a documentary on TV where they mention the catastrophe for a man just next to his retirement to see the collapse of his stock portfolio, that lost 25% since the start of the crisis.
They say that he had bought oil shares. And that this was a decades long investment.

I'm sorry, but people need to get real. In the past 5 years, oil QUADRUPLED. If you feel entitled to a multiplication by 7 and complain if it doesn't happen, you are not a long term investment. You are a quick profits addict.

On top of that, it's not very wise to have all your wealth in stocks a fortnight before retirement, but I'm not willing to blame people for being careless. On the other hand, I don't feel ready to pity those who quadrupled their savings with oil shares (that I personally shun on ethical grounds).

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi

by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 03:11:24 PM EST
Dow closes down 679 points.  S&P almost below 900.

MOVE.THAT.BUS!!!!!!!!!

WHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:11:41 PM EST
If I had any money I'd be asking myself - is it time to buy yet?  :)  

Cuz waiting for 8500 might be greedy.   Or, smart.  

It's not really an issue since I have no wads of spare cash under my bed.

by Maryb2004 on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:19:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I wouldn't buy yet.  I still think we're going to 8,000, maybe lower.  Think the S&P's going to 800.

Is it too late to get those loans back from the automakers?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:22:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep, spent the day they got them.  

Ah, well I'll hold onto my imaginary money a while longer.  

by Maryb2004 on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:25:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's too bad.  Doesn't look like Ford and GM are going to make it.  The former's trading below $2.  The latter's below $5 and dropped about a third of its value today.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:08:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A pop-cicle company or lemonade stand sells for more than $2/share.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:11:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
GM is at it's lowest since 1950, which means we haven't progressed since i was born, at least in the auto industry.  and believe me, i'm old.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:11:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
GM hasn't produced anything worth the powder to blow to hell since 1950.  I think Wall Street's being pretty generous.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:15:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have trouble feeling sorry for the companies or their shareholders but I feel sorry for the workers.  
by Maryb2004 on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:06:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Same here.  But we can't just prop up Detroit forever.  The Big Three have been managed by world-class morons for too long, and at some point I think we have to say, "Sorry, guys, but it's time to find a buyer," as we've done with the banks.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:14:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cry a river with Sad Guys On Trading Floors.

by das monde on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 01:18:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Great pictures. Too bad about the "funny" captions.
by Trond Ove on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 05:11:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Drew Man, you still plugged in back east?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:59:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Indeed.  What's up?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:02:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Shit, I go for a 3 hr nap and the DOW has tanked again.  How's that playing in your neighborhood?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:07:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Obama's up double-digits here -- in a state that hasn't voted Democratic since the Lyndon Johnson landslide of 1964.  I think that illustrates how it's playing here pretty well.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:10:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What do you think about the future prospects of ET?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:12:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think ET should be given an award, along with a lot of other blogs, for being smarter than the retards on television and in print media.  I'm not optimistic about that.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:16:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What do you think about ET becoming a Think Tank with new ideas/solutions that the Obama admin. will look to?  Think the fact that it's European will knock it out of consideration?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:20:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, Jerome actually co-authored a plan called Energize America 2020.  It was being pushed by Daily Kos bloggers for a while, and, as I understand it, a few members of Congress were interested.

As for ET doing it, I think -- and I'm cognizant of the fact that I've contributed in comments -- there's been far too much "Americanization" of ET.  It's a European site, and I, personally, come to read and discuss what's going on across the Pond.

But I do think American bloggers should be involved in pushing policy rather than simply campaigning.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:25:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't worry. We don't mind for another month, but don't be surprised if come mid-November we don't want to know for a bit

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:51:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Come November 5th, I think we'll be counting down the days until Chimpy McFlightsuit is gone.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:00:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yo Twank, check out the whole series of ET think-tank and related diaries before you wax Twankin'.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:26:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Point me in the right direction.  Link me.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:31:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Homework is part of the European work ethic.  Link yourself, or search the archives.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:02:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, right.  Thanks for nothing.  Go back to your bottle.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:14:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The cream rises to the top, especially when, in times of flame-out and meltdown, we all turn to each other virtually, to take solace, find kindred spirits, and pass along the growing wisdom.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:24:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"I wouldn't buy yet.  I still think we're going to 8,000, maybe lower."

You're assuming that the financial system as we know it will come out the other end in recognizable form. There are other possibilities, e.g. broad nationalization of industry. If it's ok to nationalize banks and insurance companies, why not car manufacturers, oil companies, drug companies, telephone companies, railroads...with unpredictable results for common stockholders...

by asdf on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 11:58:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Or there is this kind of version. On the other hand, wealth differentials historically drop with financial collapses. Won't we learn from the 19th century?

The ongoing tectonic shifts are beyond comprehension. Here are latest topics just from one blog:

The US is considering more drastic measures to shore up the banking system, namely guaranteeing bank debt and removing the ceiling on deposit guarantees... The proposal apparently being floated merely extends out to debt of 36 months and thus appears to be directed at freeing up the money markets and alleviating worries about rolling over maturing debt... Credit default swaps are a significant multiple of the value of underlying cash bonds, and more contracts get written when a credit starts looking rocky... Believe it or not, it is cheaper to insure the debt than pick up the pieces (in this environment) of losses on the credit default swaps... It is horrific that we ever got in this position...

What is going on here? The financial system is on the verge of a meltdown... So Moody's decides NOW to put out a possible downgrade alert for Morgan Stanley?... After their DECADES of being slow to downgrade... Moody's decides to become true believers in timeliness when that can have the effect of driving a knife into the markets and giving a twist?... If an investment bank is downgraded beyond a certain level, counterparties stop trading with it because they will get downgraded automatically by virtue of their exposure...

International Trade Seizing Up Due to Banking Crisis... By way of background, letters of credit of various sorts are essential for trade.... Not only are banks now leery of lending to each other for much longer than overnight, they are also starting to refuse to honor letters of credit from other banks...

Roubini Warns of Possible Systemic Meltdown, "Severe Global Depression"... Even by the standards of his alarming missives, his latest is truly troubling. Roubini effectively says the wheels are coming off the global financial system, and if corrective action is not taken immediately, the damage to the real economy will be extensive...

Rout Continues in Asia... The Nikkei went into free fall after the open, down over 900 points, and as of this writing has staged a minor recovery to a mere 780 points down and is now down 880 from yesterday's close. Singapore is down 7%, Australia 6%. The yen is at 99 to the dollar, and gold is at $928 an ounce...

by das monde on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 01:54:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A fitting finale for Bush's presidency, you have to admit.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:34:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I had just finished a conversation with just this theme.  How fitting for the frat boy f*#kup.  Let the media spin "Legacy."  He's left the planet in a flaming mess, and his name will for centuries, hopefully forever, be synonymous with abject venal failure.

How sad that we all have to pay the price for his groundless hubris.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 04:50:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The one saving grace is this meltdown is happening at the end of Bush's term rather the beginning.  Can you imagine what he would have done in early 2005?  It would have made Hoover's term look responsive and moral.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 07:39:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
a perfect epitaph for republicans, i'm hoping.

the spin is now that liberals have been scheming for decades to unravel the great benefits to society and economies by reagan and thatcher, and collapse government into socialism.

they're as spooked by pelosi as if she was the devil-

considering she's given them everything they wanted in congress since 2006, i can't think why...

oh yeah, she said nasty partisan things.

 

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:00:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
melo:
the spin is now that liberals have been scheming for decades to unravel the great benefits to society and economies by reagan and thatcher, and collapse government into socialism.

Ffs - what it is going to take for these kooks to finally start dealing with reality?

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:37:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ThatBritGuy:
Ffs - what it is going to take for these kooks to finally start dealing with reality?

exactly what's coming down the pike...

nothing else will scrape the calcified belief systems out of the frontal lobes.

it didn't have to be this way, but now it is so...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 09:07:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, leaving them in ruins, fighting a civil war within their party for years to come, would be the fitting finale on November 4th.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:06:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You should use the [Drew's WHEEEEE™ Technology]

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:15:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I did higher up the thread.  Jerome stole it from me!

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:16:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
stole and improved!

[Jerome's WEEEEEE™ Technology]

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:23:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, cuz yours doesn't have the "H," so really you're basically shouting "USSSSS!" and that makes no sense.  But I guess that what you get with your government-provided "WHEEE"s. :D

So there.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:26:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
...or maybe it's all that work until the weeee hours of the morning?
by Bernard on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 05:30:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cross-lingual confusion?

He meant "Ouuuuuuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii"

and got confused?

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 07:41:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
spent much of the afternoon in bed, (to where I shall be retreating shortly) several years ago I had quite a few teeth taken out, in the process of which they managed to crack and sew up my sinus on one side. so now when I get a cold, I get three days after where fluid builds up between Jaw and ear, which gives me three days of earache, deafness on one side, lack of balance, massive toothache in all the teeth I no longer have and a migraine like headache that runs up the front of  my face. This all takes about three days to die away. so I'll be relatively rare here for the next couple of days till I can cope with being upright.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:02:36 PM EST
Schnell güte Besserung, ceebs.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:12:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
danke

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:13:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Meine Güte ;-)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:22:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nasty :( get well soon
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 04:36:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ouch...

if i may?

miso soup and millet and dark green leafy veg, if you can eat at all.

hot compresses, Cephyl homeo-aspirin, calcium supplements.

avoid citrus, sweets or fried food. drink lots of fluids, unsweetened green tea, avoid stimulants like theine and caffeine.

acupuncture would be a good choice, if you know a good practitioner.

i went through hell of this type, jaw, lymph and exposed nerves from bad dentistry, and these things have been helpful.

get well soon, we'll miss you...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 06:27:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks, eating isn't a problem, but the false teeth dont fit at the moment, I'm looking like the standard US caricature for british dentistry today. laying with my head down so the fluids drain out has got me to where i can walk around and the pain is knocked back a bit by anti-inflamatorys

unfortunately I've just moved to a new area so don't even have a new doctor yet.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 08:12:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More tales of dental horror. Hang in there and get well soon.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 10:29:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's Late Night here at ET OT, so it's time for some music!

I'd like to pay tribute to friend and drumming mentor, Gary Burke.  He played with Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Review, for which he got a gold record hanging on the back of his bathroom door, so when you sit on the can, you're faced with it.  He spent a decade and a half as Joe Jackson's drummer, before he retired back to Woodstock to hang with the remnants of The Band.

Here he's playing with Professor Louie and the Crowmatix, the state of the art of Americana today.  But this isn't that, it's some non-vocal (from a very vocal band) blues/jazz.  The Professor often plays with the Rock of Ages horns, and that is a treat to be cherished.

Without further ado, let me introduce the Mohawk Nation's premier global drummer, Mr. Luck, Gary Burke.

(homage to rg)

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 06:21:55 PM EST
Continuing on for our late night crew (and amurka audience) here's a snatch from the Woodstock Anniversary at the New York State Museum.  Featuring, this time, the full band, with the Rock of Ages horns (for those of you familiar with horn sections, that's freakin Bones Malone on Trombone... "A Century of the Blues"...  Professor Louie and the Crowmatix!

And for a final homage to the first of the New Depression's Anthems, with a nod to The Band, here's The Weight.

Whether this is your music or not, and while my 22 years in San Francisco make me call it "home,", my real home is the Catskill Mountains (borderline Mohawk country), and this brings me home.  Thanks Professor Louie and the Crowmatix.

End of Werbung.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 07:19:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From the first to the second, what a difference a decent venue maketh!  Those soft walls and soft bodies soak up the harsh edges, take down the treble...  Who is it here who builds sound spaces?  Is it AR Geezer?  What a great job!  I could maybe go half and half, half my time I will try and be useful around Wind Power people, the other half I will try and be helpful when setting up acoustic environments.  I'm learning maths--but I'm slow!

So, in the spirit of the third track, I will take a load off and, for THE Twank--:

ET's 20 Big Ideas

;) I think I may have misunderstood something...but dat iz nature-elle!

And for both of yez: this must be my Shostakovich phase--I'm not by nature a fan of the string quartet, but here is part of one.  Particular!  I was suddenly imagining I was Mozart, listening to this music, nodding, while thinking...hmmm...

And especially for Crazy Horse -- those soft walls and bodies, yeah!  Suddenly I get a vision...."a baritone Roy Orbison"....time for bed!




Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 08:15:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
hey rg, thanks for the Shostakovich (strong) and that baritone Roy Orbison.  Here's the same band for the environmentalists in the crowd...
Los Lobos "Will the Wolf Survive"

more great musical memories as the world burns. Mexican rock in LA,
"all alone in a world in pain... but he'll find his wings...
Singing songs of passion... will the wolf survive...

nite all, once again.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 08:38:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Pinko-Commie DFH joins the Happening:



She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 07:51:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The answer, of course, is a gem i found, Professor Louie and the Crowmatix without the horns, rather, a full orchestra and full choir.  Live!

Melody of Peace

Nite, all.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 08:04:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Professor Louie Sells Out!  Bread and Circuses!

but then i'm prejudiced.  (and jealous.  i never got me no orchestra and choir.  c'ept here.)  nite all.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 08:10:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tränen um Piroschka

[...]
Der Handel mit ungarischen Staatsanleihen bricht zeitweise komplett zusammen. [The trade with Hungarian treasuries temporarily breaks down completely]
[...]
Ungarn droht der Staatsbankrott. [Hungary is threatend by bankrupcy.]
[...]

There are more problem childs than those on which recently was spoken so much. Quite some countries in eastern Europe are on the brink of collapse, most closely Hungary.

"Tränen um Piroschka" means tears for Piroska (Peeroshca(?)), Piroschka is the Germanised version of the Hungarian Piroska, where the 's' in Hugarian is spoken as 'sh' (according to wiki) and is a similar cliche name for Hungarian women as Heidi for Swiss ones.

If you can read German, you may go to the very intersting blog entry.

Otherwise:
About the chaotic politics, dodo has often written. But maybe you didn't know, that many Hungarians have participated in a carry trade, mainly with the SFC, and are heavily financed by the Alps republics Austria and Switzerland. The Hungarian Forint fell 4% yesterday against the Euro, and threatens a similar situation as Iceland. And if Hungary falls, do you want to be with your money in Baltic debt?

Jörg Haider, one of the loonys in the Austrian poltics scene, has already capitalised on the incompetence of the banks, and their lack of oversight by the gov't...


Der Amerikaner ist die Orchidee unter den Menschen
Volker Pispers

by Martin (weiser.mensch(at)googlemail.com) on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 at 09:25:02 PM EST
Quite some countries in eastern Europe are on the brink of collapse, most closely Hungary.

Hungary is Central Europe. I think brink of collapse is one too far, but see my new story on the FP.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 03:31:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Piroschka is the Germanised version of the Hungarian Piroska, where the 's' in Hugarian is spoken as 'sh' (according to wiki) and is a similar cliche name for Hungarian women as Heidi for Swiss ones.

Piroska (and yes, s is spoken like the German sch and the English sh) originates from the Latin Prisca (-> English Priscilla), but it is irreparably associated with the Hungarian translation of the Brothers' Grimmm's Little Red Riding Hood (Rotkäppchen in the German original). It is not a very common name, and like 'Heidi', there is a literary origin of the German stereotype: the holiday romance story Ich denke oft an Piroschka by Hugo Hartung, which was made into a then successful Heimatfilm movie with Liselotte Pulver.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Oct 10th, 2008 at 04:27:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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