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Friday Photography Blog No 23

by In Wales Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 08:07:46 AM EST



Time for the Saturday 'bump up' for the photography blog - In Wales


It's that time of week again!

The blog is in two parts this week - one for "Café, pub and street shots" for those shots of random people glaring at you for the pointing the camera in their direction, and any candid shots where you got away without being noticed.

The second part is for "Photos As Usual", whatever you want to post.

Please try to keep to 600 pixels width and less than 100kb in file size and take a look at Wednesday Photography Blog No.2 for the technical bits on how to post.

Please enjoy!



Display:
"CAFÉ, PUB AND STREET SHOTS"
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:41:30 AM EST
The photo in the diary is a good old Welsh rugby watching afternoon in the pub.  I don't know these people.  It was my friend's birthday so about 30 of us met for lunch and stayed on to watch the rugby. Here's the moment Wales beat England.



by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:44:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My friend on her birthday in the pub, chatting like she always does.



by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:46:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We had the whole skittles area reserved for us so it was nice and spacious, not packed full of drunk people and our pubs are smoke free now so this baby came along for his initiation.  Only for a short while.  10 weeks old, with his very proud Dad.


I used the 50mm lens for these shots but the light was low so it was tricky getting decent shots.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:50:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Were you allowing the camera choose exposure or doing it yourself?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 03:07:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Full manual, 50mm lens with the largest aperture possible so that dictated the shutter time to get decent exposure without too much movement.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:27:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I posted that before I tried playing with the image: I saw then why you'd made that choice of brightness in the image! Nasty yellow monster!

Nice composition though.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:43:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I quite like that shot:
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 03:20:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That did not occur to me to convert to B&W, thanks.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:26:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The original had lots of distracting colour that just got worse when I tried to up the exposure.  Especially the blue on the baby that looked as if it was some sort of bizarre UV light or something against the big scary yellow patch. That's always a sign it's worth trying in black and white.

If you shot the picture RAW you should be able to get some more detail out of that slightly annoying highlight on the baby's head and still bring up the father's face a little more with a little post-processing. Or send me the RAW and I'll give it a shot - I'm playing with the Aperture 2 trial version which is rather a nice toy.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:40:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lovely yellow pub walls.  Alas I did not take the photos in RAW since it was just a pub birthday thing. I must learn my lesson.  Can still send you the original if you reckon you can do anything with it?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:55:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sure, send it over - I'm messing with this thing anyway.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:58:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Always shoot raw if you can! Sure, it means that you have to miss meals so you can buy big memory cards, but who needs to eat?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:59:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thing is though, on nearly every occasion I've been out with the camera over the last few months, I have shot RAW, except for this!

I found some good deals on memory cards online. The price has come down a fair bit over the last 18 months.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 03:05:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Gorgeous scene!
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:30:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Summer in cafes of Paris.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 04:34:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Winter in the cafes of Paris.

The owner's working hard.

My couscous cafe.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 05:12:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
An old friend and his kid who I ran into in what was my favorite cafe in Paris; a really old place. It's just changed hands and they were forced to remodel it to bring it into code. I haven't tried the new version yet, but it just doesn't look the same.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 06:56:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A street scene in Guilvinec, Brittany, last July.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 08:12:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
God knows I ought to have a lot to post here, but today is devoted to scanning into digital about a zillion frames of old negs and slides. Ivonne has her new Point-and-shoot, a Panasonic Lumix FX-100, and perhaps she will contribute a few pub shots later- she's in French Lit class right now.


Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.
by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 08:17:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]

In reply to my own comment, here's a quick one- the best food we found in Prague, and the best beer, in an open-air restaurant in a vacant lot, under the tents.

Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.
by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 08:25:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A street in Wyoming

""

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson

by NearlyNormal on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 09:52:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Where can I find this street NN?

I've an acute longing for the Bighorn Mountains now. I've seen my share of mountain ranges, but Bighorn is a very very special place to me. Mountain folding cutesy style.

The conditions when we drove through were possibly as ideal as can be. The sun slanting low, the sky turning from blue to copper and the summer colours fought for attention. At the side of the road, two cowboys on horseback were herding sheep, and a dog yipping in the distance.

And that was years before Brokeback Mountain appeared.

by Nomad on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 03:24:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Head north out of Utah toward Jackson Hole.  Might look a little different right now, I'd wait until May at least.

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson
by NearlyNormal on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 05:28:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Bighorns are a wonderful range, first time I saw them my Dad and I were heading out from Indiana to my assigned base in California.  Took the northern route and, being a naive flatlander, I ended up nearly running out of gas so I had to stop partway through the bighorns at a closed gas station and we spent the night in the car.  Nearly froze, but in the morning i was awed by the beauty of the place.  I particularly like the approach when heading east, suddenly there is this magnificent range that just towers to the sky.

Damn, now I got the itch too.  Here is a little taste of the Snake to get us both through the day:

""

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson

by NearlyNormal on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 05:35:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hey!! Where are the helmets???  

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 03:56:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:41:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Lion Gate, Mycenae, Greece. Fantastic place - once, years ago, I climbed over the fence when it was closed I wish I'd taken some tourist-free photos.

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 05:39:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:42:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Was this an event or a very busy tourist site?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:50:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's the top of the steps at the Acropolis.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:12:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Obviously THE place to be seen.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:15:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]

have the entrance to Karnak.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:16:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
All those people would do my head in. How can you appreciate the place fully?  Double edged sword isn't it?  Tourism brings us to these incredible places that we would never have seen otherwise, but it brings so many of  us.  I spent most of my time in Venice muttering "bloody tourists" even though I was one.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:36:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well that was  as we were thinking about leaving. we got there first thing before the majority of tourist coaches arrived. the crowds weren't there till later. Having been there when it's crowded, the tourists really stick to the central third of the site. so there were the four of us crawling round the rest, from where you occasionally saw the human sea behind the  walls and columns at a distance. but it's almost like you're there on your own.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:57:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good approach.
I always try to wander off the main bits when I go to places like that and you find the lesser seen gems that way. Venice was a good example of the key sites and streets being packed but all you had to do was step down a side alley or wander around a little and there was nobody in sight.  I'm glad that most people don't have the imagination to think of that.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 04:30:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Inside the same site but off the beaten track.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 08:37:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Is this possible to escape crowds early morning or they start arriving at dawn?
by FarEasterner on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 04:26:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well not really till 9.

When we turned up, there was a local on a scam who I wish I'd taken a photo of, but it wasn't till I saw him later that I understood. The man was carrying a wooden gate, which he set up at the bottom of a set of stairs, and was then charging tourists to go up. I had thought that it was odd to see a man carrying a gate, but didn't stop to take a pic, and was gutted for the rest of the day that I hadn't.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 08:41:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Obviously a future CEO for one of the leading international banks...

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:15:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 of shots starts with my friends, busy dialling their mobiles:

Recently there was Losar in McLeod Ganj and Tibetans were wearing their traditional cloths, rare feast for eyes as they mostly changed to casual European style garments.

As you know part of my journey in North Eastern India I travelled with a group of Russians and we we not shy of exploring the best dining options. This restaurant with interesting decor was in Siliguri, otherwise drab transport junction.

The best eating experience offered Glenary's in Darjeeling not least for courteous service and views (see two shots in second section).

I can call this picture "Bhai ji"(it means respectable brother) as this  woman was always referring to waiters (or any other Indian men) so.
by FarEasterner on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 06:31:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Busy...


Caught in the act...


What's available...


Having a laugh with the brewmeister (through taps)...


Unwilling subject...

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:21:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Great. These win "best photos for subject of the day."

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:23:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks LEP!

That means a lot!

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:37:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Where were these shot?

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:25:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"The Lanesplitter", in Berkeley, CA.

On San Pablo Ave. at Univesity Ave.

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:38:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Mendocino Blue Heron is one of the best beers in the world, and they have it on draught....{jealous}

Iron spring isn't bad either (had it once)

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 06:48:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 11:16:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Excellent!

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 11:17:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
taken while messing about with my phone.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 11:34:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Your phone takes a wide screen shot?

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 11:37:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
takes three and stitches them together into a panoramic view (which results in two barmen).

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 11:53:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought it was a mirror.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 12:18:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Best view from a rooftop café of the of the street - Nice's Promenade des Anglais - for the carnival:

montse-vue-carn-50668

Where today it was:

bataille-sign-50683

Is this creationist fantasy?:

dinosaur-carn-50676

Flower dancers:

dancers-fleurs-50657

Bye - for this year:

femmes-fleurs-50683

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 05:28:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was quite late this week, work as always !
Café's pictures ? Mostly portraits again...

Lost in translation ?




"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 05:42:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Or the "old" and "new" way to work in a café...!



"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 05:45:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You seem as drawn to young women as I am.
Frankly, I can't think of a nicer attraction :-)

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 09:09:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
LEP:
You seem as drawn to young women as I am.

That's why I won't give you my usual café's address :-)

Though I would extend it to women - "young" being just a temporary state - and I would add (just in case) that I do show them the picture :-)

"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 09:20:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"PHOTOS AS USUAL"
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:42:06 AM EST
Moths in the light.
Photobucket
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:57:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Kitchen with a view
Photobucket
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:58:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Under the mosquito net.

Photobucket

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:58:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
By now, folks probably have read that I am not an enthusiastic photographer but that my father was--so I learned quite a bit just by staying awake around him.  Not long ago, I found some of his older pictures.  I am reasonably certain he developed the film and printed the pictures.  Camera was a Zeiss Ikon.

Threshing wheat in SE Kansas 1937

Planting, Kansas, 1937

My grandfather's house, 1939

My father.  Self portrait 1940.  He always loved the timed shutter release on those old cameras.



"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 04:05:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
These are wonderful, techno.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 04:24:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
those are great, techno.

what's that book on your father's desk? transforming friendship....?

it's a wonderful self-portrait, and the farm shots are magnificent too.

wow

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 04:49:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you!

Turns out you can read "transforming friendship" yourself.  
http://www.archive.org/details/MN41580ucmf_4

It was written by a Methodist clergyman and printed by University of Chicago.  Christianity as pop sociology.  My father was on his way to becoming a Lutheran preacher and the problem of keeping Christianity relevant was becoming acute 11 years into the Great Depression.  So these sorts of books were quite common.  He had shelves of them by the time I came along.

As for the farms shots--I love them too.  At full size, they are amazingly detailed.  Note in the threshing picture, the assembled neighbors have only one internal combustion engine and it is driving the threshing machine.  

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 06:10:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The wheat-threshing photo is phenomenal. How to frame the progression of a complex system of work? The application and movement of the workers? The breadth of the earth and sky where it takes place? All here in one shot with a left-to-right movement and a following breeze... Alive and wonderful.

My father too was a minister of religion and a Zeiss Ikon user. Unfortunately I have none of his photos.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 08:47:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My dad has a lot of photos taken by my grandfather in the Philippines during WW2 that I wish I could get my hands on and scan in. He won't let me near them, sadly.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:34:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks afew.

Couple of additional points here.  This is Kansas!  It was probably 40°C when that picture was taken.  Also, threshing machines were VERY loud.

I am just old enough to have seen a threshing crew in action.  The work was very hard but this is the harvest--there is a joy that a growing season's worth of effort has paid off.  The amount of food it takes to keep the threshers fed is staggering so in addition to the crew you see--there is another crew of mostly women who cooked from dawn until late at night just to keep them going.

So threshing is about cooperation between neighbors.  It is mostly just hot dirty work but there is also an incredible amount of skill on display--social organization, mechanical maintenance, understanding when plants are perfectly ripe for harvest, etc.

Seeing threshing crews in action affected my political outlook.  When I was a university student studying political science, I had an arrogant prick for a professor who one day asserted that Marx had made fun of "the idiocy of rural life."  I thought of myself as a radical leftist in those days but at that moment, I knew I was NEVER going to be a Marxist.  Rural life was a lot of things but idiotic was NOT one of them.  Not surprisingly, the failure to properly organize agriculture was a chronic problem for the Marxists.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 06:49:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well said, techno.  I don't remember such crews myself, but I heard the stories growing up.  One of my Dad's favorite stories from his childhood was of such a crew threshing wheat on my Grandfather's farm.  Gramp owned the thresher, a neighbor owned a steam engine.  Several other neighbors gathered to work together and it was a matter of some urgency to get everyone's fields harvested when the wheat was ready and the weather right.

One day the crew was working hard to finish a field, pushing the crew and the machines pretty hard.  Suddenly the pressure relief valve on the boiler began to pop off.  At the time Bill Reedy, the owner of the engine, was on the wagon feeding the thresher.  When he heard the relief valve pop, he knew that very soon a safety plug in the bottom of the boiler would blow out, relieving the pressure and blowing out the fire all at once.  It was a real safety feature.  It meant the crew was in no real danger, but it also meant the boiler, as well as the engine, the thresher, and more importantly the harvest, would be out of commission until a new plug could be installed.

Knowing he had very little time to intervene, he dropped his pitchfork, leaped off the wagon, and sprinted to the engine to manually relieve the pressure and shut down the engine.  In the ensuing silence, he looked around to find that he apparently had the entire wheat field to himself.

"Hey," he called, "where'd everybody go?"

Gradually the rest of the crew appeared from whatever cover they had ducked behind or under.  "What the hell is the matter with you guys?" Bill asked.

After looking around at the rest of the crew slowly gathering from their hiding places, my Grandfather said, "We all looked up and saw you running.  We figured if Bill Reedy was running, it was time to run."

We all bleed the same color.

by budr on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 02:12:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes indeed.  Farming is also dangerous--ranking up there with underground mining and heavy construction.

In the 1979 Golden Palme winning film "Northern Lights" there is an incredible scene of a threshing crew in North Dakota.  They are hurrying to finish the job when it begins to snow.  It is VERY realistic.

I got to meet with John Hanson the film's director.  He said that scene happened with NO special effects.  They had called for extras with threshing experience.  They had found machinery that had been put back into operating condition.  When everything was in place and filming had begun, it started to snow.  The director asked an old-timer what would have happened in such a situation.  The old-timer said, "We would have kept threshing."  So they kept filming--creating perhaps the most realistic footage ever in cinematic history.

The award was well-deserved!

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 05:05:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Farming techno in Porspoder... (Like those old tractors!)
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:45:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:47:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, that brings back memories.  I rode on the fender of a tractor very like that, though much older, with my father and my grandfather when I was very small.  I learned to drive sitting on their laps on that old Ford 9N.  I literally cannot remember when I didn't know how to drive.  It makes me think about my 16 year old, just now making a concerted effort to learn how to drive well enough to earn his coveted driver's license, and it reminds me how much we gave up when we stopped making our living directly from a piece of earth where such things were possible.

We all bleed the same color.
by budr on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 01:43:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Like these images of a sane world!
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:48:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Like these images of a sane world - Kansas and Porspoder...
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:49:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Macho Grampa Sly.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 06:06:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 06:16:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nice.
Bubbly joy.

Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.
by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 08:11:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What is it with bubbles? I've never seen a kid yet who wasn't fascinated by them.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 08:57:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]

During a walking trip - Sczechuan Province - near Chengdu


Near Buddhist Temple in Liaoning Province, Manchuria


Liaoning Province


Buddhist Temple complex Liaoning Province

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 09:55:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Not that many Mao statues still standing.  This one is in Chengdu, Sczechuan Province.  Both photos from 1992.


This one in Shenyang, Liaoning Province.  Opposite ends of the country.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 10:00:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Barbarian View of the Wall - but from the civilized side.



I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 10:03:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
These are very interesting Gringo. Thanks.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:32:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 03:05:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Magnificent view!
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:28:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
All politics aside, China is a fascinating country.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 03:05:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mother, listening to her daughter's plea that she would like custom-made dreadlocks for her 14th birthday.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 11:19:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Look closely at Mr Grumpy (left) and Miss Pleasant (right). Then move your head back a metre or so - they change places.

Created at the University of Glasgow (it says here).

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 11:27:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 03:00:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You know...I'm not really 8 ft tall!!!

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 04:02:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What's that in hands?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 04:58:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh...about 24 hands...!

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 05:34:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm calling the Guinness book of records. 2.4 metres? Gerraway....

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 05:41:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Does Colman know where your withers are?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 05:44:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Elevator doors at the Delft public library


Elevator


The new library building opened last year. It's wonderful! They have design furniture, beautiful and functional modern architecture, a lovely cafe with a stage for local talents, a music listening area, a play area for kids, art exhibitions, Wii games and of course plenty of books. Even in English. I'm planning to shoot a 8-picture fashion series there next month.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 04:43:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How funky!  I really like the shot. How was the vignetting achieved?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 03:00:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Haha, photoshop filters. :-p

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--
by tzt (tzt) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 04:33:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspected that! It works well though.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 04:38:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]


We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 04:57:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Some kind of Icelandic nag. 5 kms out of Reykjavik.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 05:08:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]


We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 05:21:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Today morning I went to McLeod Ganj (where Dalai-lama is currently giving lessons) and bought in bookshop foundation course in photography from Peter Cortrell. Never thought I would have to buy the book like this but it dawned to me that it's necessary if I want to proceed further from amateurish pic-making.
The book is fortunately not big and after short reading I marked in my mind about the Golden space, layout of pictures in 9 quadrants and so on.
As I have already made many thousand photos I need to adjust them in Photoshop according to these principles as my publisher recentl;y asked me to submit my photos for quality-check. I hope they will be called at least satisfactory.
And I will adjust photos for my presentation of my Indian travels here, I plan surprise.
by FarEasterner on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 04:33:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Excellent!  I hope we get to see some of the results.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 04:39:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Learn the rules only so you know when and why you're breaking them. But you know that already, I'm sure.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 04:50:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here are two shots taken in Glenary's restaurant in Darjeeling. I suspect the right one is what I need but interiour is also important, right? What do you think?

Please rate this photos:
First is landscape, view of Kanchenjunga (8680 metres) from Gangtok, capital of Sikkim. Is there anything wrong with it?

Second picture of destitutes queueing in one of Chotiwalas (restaurants) near Har-ki-Pairi ghat in Haridwar, I suspect some devotees sponsored free breakfast for them. I think it is not a sort of picture for guidebook, am I right?

by FarEasterner on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 06:51:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I like the one on the right at the top.  The view from the window is stunning and it is lost when exposing for the interior (which is a bit messy and distracting, it's not needed in this photo).  I think the almost silhouette of the woman works well. I'd crop it a little tighter around the window, to get rid of some of that dark block at the bottom, cut out the bit of the next window you can see along the left and make the window with the view and the silhouetted woman the key features.

I like the second one but it does not look very sharp or crisp.  The colours could be a bit bolder, maybe more saturated but that could increase the noise/grainyness of the shot.  Do you have photoshop or other software? I sometimes find that using levels in photoshop, cuts out that slightly hazy look in photos like that, a lot of my landscape shots look like this. Other people may have better advice on how to improve the colours.

I find the bottom one really interesting but perhaps you are right, it is not for a guidebook, unless the book wants to highlight some examples of poverty.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 07:06:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you for advice to crop the 1st picture.
Second picture I took simply from window in my hotel, due to distance the view is not perfect, that's why I resorted to zooming and losing quality. I have idea how to use this photo though - I want to crop shining lumps of mountains in equal quadrants, then assemble them in panorama image like pieces of mosaic. I think it maybe used for decoration of Sikkim chapter.
About third people say - it's ugly scene and great pic but definitely not for guidebook.
by FarEasterner on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 07:19:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
forget to ask (about second picture) - do you know how big (in pixels) picture for decoration should be if in book the panoramic photo should be around 3*7 or 2*6 centimetres?
by FarEasterner on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 07:31:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not sure to be honest. I would say as big as possible for quality but that isn't always possible. They can reduce the size for their own purposes.  The guidebook people ought to have some idea of what is needed.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 07:41:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am not an expert, but apparently you need ~300 pixels per inch to print at an "acceptable photo quality" of ~150 dots per inch. That's 120 pixels per centimetre, so 360x840 pixels for 3x7 or 240x720 pixels for 2x6.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 07:42:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I wanted something like this:

but unfortunately as original photo was just 1024 pixels in width such collage may be printed only as 2x6 or even smaller.
by FarEasterner on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 08:51:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nice idea. Shame about the resolution though.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 08:53:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One can increase the number of pixels quite a bit without negatively affecting details; however, increasing the size of the photo will not help a photo that lacks sufficient detail to begin with.  In such cases the lack of detail may become more obvious.  I have software to increase pixel size up to 600 per cent.  If you like, send the digital file to me and I'll give it a try. No guarantees that it will produce wonders, but it could work (stargazingcamel@aol.com).

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 03:46:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you for offer of help - if I need enlarging the picture I will know where to write ;)

By the way maybe you know how I can reduce grains from scans (for example in Photoshop) that they will look like camera-made picture? I have some scans (actually advertising materials) which I have to include in my book but after scanning them I realized that the texture of scans is different from photos. Or it's better not to scan them but photograph? I tried one time to photograph but it was worse than scanning.

by FarEasterner on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 08:24:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You should be able to choose the resolution that you scan in at.  Higher resolution should give you a similar result to the original picture.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 09:44:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I tried but when I increased resolution too much (for example starting with 1200 dots per inch or so) picture quality does not improve much but used disk space - yes.
by FarEasterner on Mon Feb 25th, 2008 at 04:25:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Scanners will sometimes pretend to support higher resolution than they do ...
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2008 at 04:29:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More than you wanted to know I'm sure, but...

Yes, I've noticed a lot of grain in some of my scans also, especially from negatives that produce higher grain to begin with.  For example, the higher the ISO number, generally the more apparent grain you will see. Good film at 100 ISO or below produces little apparent grain at moderate sized enlargement while ISO 800 will show more.  I believe that grain is also more apparent in negatives than positive (chrome/slide) films.  The other thing I have heard is that scanning resolutions at 5000ppi and above somehow avoid magnifying the grain that you and I see from our scans.  Unfortunately, my film scanner maxes out at 4000ppi.

Another solution is to use a scanning software that has built in grain reduction. A German company (Lasersoft) produces a scanning software called Silverfast Ai that has a built in grain reduction program that works very well.  I use it on my flatbed scanner for print scanning and medium format transparency scans.  Unfortunately, Silverfast is not inexpensive unless you get it bundled with the purchase of a scanner as I did.  I've been toying with the idea of obtaining it for my film scanner, but it runs over $300, and it's good for just the one scanner.  Each scanner has its own version.

You might try scanning at a lower resolution and see what effect that has on reducing grain. In Photoshop try using the Filter>Noise>dust&scratches or the median filter.  Also be sure to buy low grain films to begin with.  Check manufacturer's or photo web site for stats on products.

I used these two filters on the photo below.  First pic is the untouched version.  The second is dust and scratches, and third is median. Both filters seem to blur details somewhat depending on how you set them, so be careful and be prepared to use a sharpening method to bring back detail.  By the way, this photo wasn't all that sharp to begin with and before cropping, this it included the whole animal and quite a bit of background.. Sharpening is also necessary for scanned photos/transparencies that will be used for books/magazines, etc, in order to get the best product, but that's a whole complicated subject by itself.




I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 03:17:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you so much. I never knew about software.

Of course I tried using Dust & scratches in Photoshop but it was not perfect. Then I used Adobe Image Ready (I don't remember precisely what i did but I think when I opened a photo or scan it used to say it can optimize it and in some scans result was little bit better).

Then i found how to improve - just next to Dust & Scratches button there is one - Reduce noise with three parameters. After many attempts I found when I put upper one at 0, and the rest at 25%, result is quite satisfactory. You can try also.

by FarEasterner on Mon Feb 25th, 2008 at 04:32:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I originally tried using the reduce noise filter on the photo above and it didn't reduce the grain at all so I didn't include the results in my posting. It appeared to me that the reduce noise filter affects mostly other types of noise such as scanner induced, camera, and Jpeg compression noise. These types of noise problems seem to be affected differently than film grain by the filter, but if your results work for you then there is no problem.  One would think that noise is noise, but the size, color and frequency of the noise may be looked at in different ways by the software. Anyway, best of luck with your photos and book.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Mon Feb 25th, 2008 at 10:59:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
First picture is how Kanchenjunga mountain is seen from Darjeeling, West Bengal.

Second picture I took descending from Rohtang pass (4000 m) near Manali, Himachal Pradesh.


by FarEasterner on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 08:58:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow, I really love the second one.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:14:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am glad you liked it.

Light, light, is everything in photography, right?

by FarEasterner on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:18:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It really is!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:27:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That second one is awesome

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Feb 28th, 2008 at 08:24:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Spruce tree on my land in Marin, CA (6' wide)


Me holding drunk bird at winery (had one too many fermented grapes)
(coworker took it with my camera)


Brother and father camping (mmm, Czech beer)


Unwilling subject (my brother before nap)


Me and the pooch camping, Trinity Alps, CA (my brother took it, I set it up)


Former coworkers...


Beer:30


Good night, Mt. Tamalpias, CA

by gioele (gioele(daught)sandler(aaaattttt)gmail(daught)kom) on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 09:32:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A view of the famed Registan in Camarkand... At a time when it wasn't yet a touristic heading...!



"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 05:50:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And to pursue the "Kilroy was here" topic, The good old tram of Istanbul at Taxim with the kids trying to get the free ride.... :-)




"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 05:53:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A Ksar (old fortified city) or what could have been, as seen by a satellite, in a worn out rock near the beach :-)




"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 05:58:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 12:02:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Celebrity dog!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 03:30:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh yes, TV and film star.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2008 at 03:31:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:53:16 PM EST
Our Bratislavan hosts were just wonderfully gracious --
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:55:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:56:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And here's a Bratislava paparazzi for you!
by The3rdColumn on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 01:58:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A peek at a Bratislavan trompe l'oeil ...

by The3rdColumn on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 11:36:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If I remember correctly, you had a lovely sunset last week as well. I am a sunset freak too.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Feb 22nd, 2008 at 02:36:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hi LEP,

Am one too! Yep -- got a series of those. Will have to upload them to flickr yet and will publish them as Friday Photography blog goes along. (Like this blog/diary lots!)

by The3rdColumn on Sat Feb 23rd, 2008 at 11:39:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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