Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Friday Photography Blog No. 28

by In Wales Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:56:59 AM EST

Hurrah for Fridays!

Photobucket


The blog is in three parts this week - one for "Exciting things from the last week" for those for those of us who have had anything exciting or slightly different from usual happen in the last week, and perhaps just happened to have a camera around for it.

The second part is for "Ask The Expert", where you can talk about your photoshop, cropping, technical or arty woes and we'll all try to sort you out.

The final part is for "Photos As Usual", whatever you want to post.

Please try to keep to 600 pixels width and less than 100kb in file size and take a look at Wednesday Photography Blog No.2 for the technical bits on how to post.

Please enjoy!


Display:

"EXCITING THINGS FROM THE LAST WEEK"
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:57:39 AM EST
I went to Cardiff Castle.  It's great but as you can see, the city hasn't been built around it in the most complimentary way possible.  Slight chaos on the eye.

Photobucket

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:08:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]

I had a party over Easter that got wonderfully out of hand. My good friend Kai is an excellent pro photographer working for one of the Finnish colour supplements. He has a hi-tech, but battered flash rig capable of capturing a seemingly endless rapid stream of 18 meg pix.

He has made his own mods to the flash and I very much like the flash lighting effect with fast drop off at the edges and soft but crisp front lighting from about 30 cms above the lens.

I'm hugging his girlfriend ;-)

Here is another example of the same flash lighting...

Teenagers often get bored when their parents are being silly...


You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:14:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That flash works incredibly well.  I really like the effect. How did he modify the flash? Or perhaps I should be asking, what is a flash rig?!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:36:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A flash rig is an external flash attached to the camera (and triggered by the shutter) - either on the built-in shoe, or screwed to a bracket that then screws into the tripod thread under the camera. His flash was high up, so I guess it was fixed to the shoe on top of the camera.

I was having too much fun to notice exactly what his equipment was. But when he sent me the pictures I fell in love with the effect. I'll give him a call and ask about camera and flash.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 09:11:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah I see.  I have that for my camera so I would be very interested to know how he modified it! It is a great effect.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 09:25:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I just spoke to Kai and he recalls having fun too and operating on automatic pilot. Artists!

He's not even sure which camera he had that evening - but it was his favourite 24mm lens. The flash unit was switched to narrow beam and bounced off the ceiling (which is quite low in my place). The combination of wide lens and narrow beam bounce flash gives the fall-off effect. He prefers to work like that in documentary situations and then crop later - shooting a lot of frames to capture the one good moment.

I guess, as a magazine photgrapher, you get very used to quickly identifying the few frames that potentially work and junking the rest. The supplement he works for has a reputation for creative photography and graphics.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 09:55:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah looking again I can see now that it was bounced off the ceiling.  I don't think my flash has an option to narrow the beam but there must be other ways of doing that. I'll have to try the wide angle lens for this sometime.  Thanks for asking for me.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 10:05:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You could for instance just have a sleeve of black paper wrapped around the flash head that made a tunnel. The edges of the shadows would start abruptly un a direct flash, but when the tunnelled flash is bounced off the ceiling it makes a kind of domed lghting that spills into shadow without a sharp edged distinction bteween lit and shadow.

As we've discussed before, bounced light depends quite a lot on the material you are bouncing off and its position. A high white ceiling will allow the upwards flash to spread more and thus cover a wider area. A low ceiling (as in the room where I was) limits the spread of the flash. If the ceiling is any other colour/material than white, that colour will give a colour cast on the illuminated area. Luckily there are not too many green ceilings ;-)

A gloss as opposed to a matt ceiling surface will also change the quality of the light. You can also bounce off walls and get a nice side soft light. And if you want the Degas stage underlight light effect, you can bounce off a white floor!  As usual there are no real rules, you just have to try 'em out. The more pictures you take, the more you get an instinct for what would be right in a given situation.

But it is also useful to analyze (rapidly) before you start taking photos in a particular situation. Try to think why a particuar scene has caught your eye. Try to find the essence of the scene. That might help you to decide where to stand in relation to the light and the subject, which lens, what depth of field etc. All of them work together to tell a story.

When you are there yourself, you see everything around you. Your photograph, though, will contain almost nothing of that everything. A person looking at it later will not have any of that other information. So you have to convey that feeling in any way you can. I think many people cannot distinguish between what they feel in a situation, and the feeling framed in the picture they are about to take.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 11:44:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Analyzing what is in front of me and how best to make use of it is something that needs a lot more practice.  There are always loads of things I don't see until I have the shot in photoshop and then kick myself for missing something vital or obvious.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:02:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't wory - it's normal. When I started out as a film cameraman, my cheeky assistant called me 'Babylegs' because my standard solution to anything boring was to take out the short tripod (babylegs in movie parlance) and shoot lying down. My other speciality was doing cheapo tracking shots on a blanket pulled by cheeky drawers. Excellent in hospital corridors, not so good on carpet.

I think Colman has probably fallen in love with babylegs already.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:20:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Does your flash have a zoom head? Which one do you have?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:13:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A zoom head?  I have the SB600 (or 500 maybe, can't remember).  So I can rotate the direction of the flash and I have a diffuser cap for it as well to soften the light.  I can alter the intensity of the flash easily too. It can be used wirelessly as well, away from the actual camera.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:15:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Right. Get your manual. Look up controlling the zoom of the flash manually, set it to 85mm, take picture with wide-angle lens. You'll get something like that effect, but with the SB-800 and a 20mm on a D200 would need to put a snoot on it - which is the tube of black paper Sven is talking about above.

The photographer is using a Canon EOS-1D Mark II, so I guess he's got a Canon flash of some sort, which means he may or may not need to put a snoot on to get that effect.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:27:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Snoot?!! lol.
I'll pull out the manual when I get home.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:43:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, I missed the explanation about bouncing it, which might explain the difference.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:44:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A bouncing snoot?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:45:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
is the word, not snoot.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:32:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Huh. The websites I've been reading don't agree.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:36:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have seen the snood spelling before though, I think.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:44:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's one for you: cuculoris

I last used one while lighting a jungle scene.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:58:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A specific type of gobo?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:14:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A solid flag with an intricate organic pattern jig-sawed out of it. Imitates the effect of light through foliage etc.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:28:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Snoot (as in snooty) is definitely proboscial

A snood is a kind of bag for the hair. My mother always called a net onion bag a snood. It evolved to refer to bands around the head and onward into movie use. Samuelson's rental catalogue in the 70's referred to snoods. My crew called them that, from movie use.

But I have to say the snoot etymology is more satisfying. ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:52:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Pleasure:

Notice th anticipation of the tongue in this one.

All taken with no flash using automatic ISO a la margouillat.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:28:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
...a bit of train blogging...

A half-hour-late EC 278 JAROSLAV HAŠEK, en route from Budapest to Prague. Consists of ŽSSR [Slovakia] class 350 "Gorilla" loco and ČD (Czech) cars, but due to the former's defect, it is in tow of MÁV [Hungary] V43 ("Szili") 1301. Further back, another V43 arrived with an empty train to turn around as local train.

Your EU tax dollars at work: Szob is the starting point of a narrow-gauge railway rebuilt 2006-7 with EU structural funds support (I photo-reported). The organisers failed to purchase rolling stock in time, so regular traffic will only start maybe later this spring. The Szob 'terminal', on an entirely new branch to the normal-gauge railway station:



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:47:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not necessarily my favorites of the group, but these all contain some lessons learned.

The pasture land between the Sierra foothills and the central valley is absolutely gorgeous (my inner protestant from the blasted pains of the midwest does not approve of the embarrassing bounty of riches here in CA). When we stopped for photos in the place shown I had my new 50mm lens on the camera. There wasn't much room for movement being bounded by barbed wire fences, so I was forced into compositions I wouldn't otherwise choose with the flexibility of the superzoom. I like this photo and I would not have willingly made it with my usual lens.

This is my first try at the "running water" style shot. No tripod, just a steady hand and (more importantly) a VR lens. This one came to life after some camera RAW adjustments which excited me greatly as I've now proven to myself that I have some basic photoshop skills.

In this shot I had to brighten my friend using photoshop, but right after taking it, I popped up the flash and discovered that it works really well in backlit and shadow conditions during the daytime. I have three similar pics using the flash that look more natural, but I posted this one because I took it right after she made it to the top of the boulder and her smile was too good to pass up.


you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:24:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I had the flash on in this shot taken several minutes later. You can make out the shadow generated by the long barrel of the lens at the bottom center of the photo. I struggled mightily with mid-day bright light with shadow conditions all weekend, and actually erred on the side of overexposing in many cases, going against "the rules." Steph (my friend in the photos) and I got into a good argument over this when we first examined the photos.



you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:49:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think you will discover that any picture that can benefit from fill flash is possibly going to become a favorite.

And don't forget to use it when under a tree that is producing dappled light.  Because the dappled light is usually so beautiful, you can easily forget that blotchy faces are not nearly so attractive.  Turn on your fill flash and poof, the problem goes away.

The other place where fill flash really helps is with flowing water.  No shutter can stop water but a flash certainly can.  For a short distance--like less than 2 meters.

Here's a picture of some raspberries I picked myself--VERY proud of those raspberries.  My little point-and-shoot had no trouble stopping the droplets in midair.  I remember when it required a VERY expensive flash gun to do THIS.




"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:13:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm impressed with the quality of built in flash units on DSLRs. Now with this new knowledge, of course, I want to buy a more powerful flash anyway...

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:16:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah! Flash gun lust.  I know it well.

And while you are at it, buy those diffuser tents that go over the nice flash units.  Trust me on this, if you have those and learn how to use them, you will take incredible pictures--especially portraits and product shots.

Just remember, photography is about capturing light.  It's a whole new world when you have to supply the light too.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:35:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do you mean a softbox?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:01:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My friend has one, it's seriously good.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:20:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Haven't a clue what they are called--though I have several friends that own them--NICE light!

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"
by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:40:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The D200 is the first one I've been happy with the pop-up flash at all, even for fill. Wait until off-camera flash starts getting to you.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:00:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My inner materialist demands satisfaction:

http://www.adorama.com/NKSB400AFU.html

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:03:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't do it: save up for at least a SB-600 instead. That thing doesn't even do bounce flash.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:04:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was afraid you'd say that.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:05:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I take that back - the SB-400 does bounce horizontally. It's all the other features of a flash that it's missing.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:11:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's small size is appealing for my double-secret backpacking trip, though.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:13:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Its!

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:15:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, you know what? You probably won't regret buying it. You might hit off its limitations eventually, but there's always room for a small flash in a camera bag and you'll probably get good trade-in or resale value from it in a year or two. I wouldn't buy it, because I know I like to use the features of the SB-800, like full manual control and so on.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:13:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorry, the splashing water didn't seem to show in the above picture.  Here is a tighter shot.  Notice the splash at about 3:30 from the column of water.  And all those sparkles are water droplets--I have not glazed the berries.




"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:27:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh yum. I love raspberries. They look especially delicious. Nice capture of the water too.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:21:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Flash is much more useful during daylight - you've just invented fill-in flash, which adds some front lighting to a scene lit naturally from another angle.

It's a very nice technique - should be standard issue on all cameras. ;)

You can also use it to destroy any possible reference point for white balance:

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:14:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That works really well.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:45:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Flash is much more useful during daylight

It's a revelation.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:10:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it's been a very boring week as my dog will attest:

and black dogs are hard to photograph, and this one would probably benefit from some lightening.

shot through a piece of dichroic glass in one of the ctyd gate:

by town on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:33:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Took a fair few photos this week, but most are either snap shots or of family members who I don't really want to expose here ...

Christopher and Cleo:

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:19:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So they come equipped with airbags now?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:31:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Make that Christopher and Cleo and Figgy's bum ...
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:54:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My life this week has been so exciting that...I've been trying to sort out some of those packets of old photographs...

One of my last pre-digital trips was to India:

Taj Mahal

And, because the tourist police confiscate your camera on the way out if you don't take this shot...

by Sassafras on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:30:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Those are great.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Mar 29th, 2008 at 03:55:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Mar 29th, 2008 at 02:54:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ahhhhhh!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Mar 29th, 2008 at 04:14:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"ASK THE EXPERT"
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:58:38 AM EST
Photobucket

This could have been a good shot had I not forgotten to move the filter round when I turned the camera on it's side.  It made me wonder if the grad filter would have been better placed in the bottom half of the shot to darken the cloud or would it have been better off without?

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:02:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The only filter I have ever used for outdoor photography is a polarizing filter and I don't even have that choice for my point-and-shoot.  So my suggestion is to consider filters just something else to stop carrying around. Anything worth using a filter for can be probably simulated in Photoshop.

But this picture is actually about the most interesting of questions when shooting outdoors--waiting for light.  In this case, the sun is probably going behind the clouds for short time periods--you can tell because there's a big patch of blue.  In such a case, you should wait for the light because otherwise the picture is essentially spoiled--because there is not enough (or the wrong kind) light on wall and the flag.

However, if the flag is in the shadow of the building and will be for say, the next six hours, waiting is impossible.  In such a situation, you must make do.  In my film days, I would bracket the shot with f-stops on either side of my best exposure guess.  If you do this digitally, you may have pictures that are easier to manipulate in Photoshop.  In this case, I would choose to work with the picture that gave me the best detail of the stone wall.

Another thing you can try is to "change" the background by moving around a bit.  There may have been an angle here where the flag is in front of the big white cloud.  That may have helped the composition and it might have made it easier to Photoshop.  In any case, you give yourself a few more options if you find yourself constrained in other ways (you're in a tour group, your kids are furious that you have stopped again to take a picture, etc. etc.)

But if your goal was to show a blustery cold spring day, you succeeded.  I can assure that I have nothing so warm to wear that I would have wanted to wait very long for the light.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:01:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I really should make more use of my polarizing filter.  I have one and it is easy enough to use but I instinctively take out the grad filter each time. I didn't have the tripod with me but bracketing is another thing I need to think about more often.

I think I took the photo from that angle since that was where the flag was billowing such that I could catch the dragon. Easter monday with 20 tourists in my way and an impatient friend getting cold, as you say constrains the time and composition!

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:41:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My dad was a big fan of the polarizing filter.  He took a lot of pictures in the Midwest where there was often a lot of water in the air during the summer.  This would introduce a haze that would lower the detail of clouds.  In the black and white days, he would used a red or yellow filter to put the definition back into the clouds.

When color came along, hanging a red filter in front of the lens seemed especially pointless.  Happily for my father, the polarizing filter had just gone on sale when he made his first serious moves to color.  And it works MUCH better than a colored filter anyway--it doesn't do anything about the water in the air, but it does make it possible so the light the humidity is reflecting doesn't show up in your picture.

His nature photography lenses had their own polarizing filters that almost never came off.  And you don't CAN turn them "off" if they start causing problems like eliminating the reflections on the surface of water, for example.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:13:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Your last sentence doesn't make sense?

I still use red and yellow filters on B&W film: these are the black and white days!

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:18:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, but now black and white is a choice!

As for making the surface of water disappear--that is a known hazard of polarization.  I knew a guy who almost killed himself landing an airplane on a lake--turns out he was breaking in a new pair of polarized flying glasses and the word had not yet spread about some of polarization's drawbacks.  With the lens filter, of course, you just rotate the front glass 90° and you are back to the "real" world.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:32:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I will make a mental note to use it more.  I have decided to keep a scrapbook of useful tips and thoughts regarding photos.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:22:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Waiting for light is a cultural decision, IMHO.  My father and I had a serious disagreement over the practice when he waited four DAYS for light in the Grand Tetons.  I was a teenager and I was bored silly.

So I have spent some time collecting strategies for getting the best pictures under the circumstance.  And of course, the best strategy is to go out with your camera when the light is most likely to be good.  Unfortunately, many photogenic sites are closed during golden hour.

"Remember the I35W bridge--who needs terrorists when there are Republicans"

by techno (reply@elegant-technology.com) on Sat Mar 29th, 2008 at 03:49:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for all the tips, your contributions have been great.  Must say, I'm not hardcore enough to wait 4 days for the right light!  I hope he got a bloody good photo from that.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Mar 29th, 2008 at 03:57:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Despite being surrounded by the flowers, this is the only daffodil shot I have managed to get so far.  Shot through the window of the castle keep, looking onto the moat. Would this have been a candidate for spot metering?

I had an impatient and cold friend with me so I had seconds to take any photos so I kept it on program mode and didn't alter any settings at all.

Photobucket

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:06:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
l'm contemplating upgrading to a macbookpro and l'm curious if any of you have experience with the  apple Aperture 2 application.

l currently have photoshop cs v. 8, [still pretty much a black-hole of a learning curve] as well as the canon digital photo pro programs on my existing mac, and wonder if there's any advantage to getting it as part of the package.

several friends of mine, both skilled photographers, are using it and they're lobbying hard for it's inclusion.

any thoughts?

thanks in advance.

by town on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:24:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If you take a lot of photos Aperture is great - it's a good organisation tool and it allows you do the basic post-processing quickly. It's also good at outputting the photos. If you want to do a lot of complicated manipulations, (which I generally don't) you'll need photoshop or the gimp or whatever to do the manipulations.

Aperture is a much smoother, smarter version of iPhoto ... I like it a lot, and use it as my primary post-processing tool, together with Noise Ninja for handling noise reduction, especially from my GR-D II.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:33:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do you have a machine the trial version will run on?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:47:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
thanks for the feedback. l thought about that and checked, and no, l don't.

l'm leaning toward getting it, as l do minimal manipulation. interesting that you need another app for noise reduction...is the Noise Ninja a freeware app? l'm not familiar with it.

by town on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:06:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I only really need Noise Ninja (€80) for the small sensor GR-D II, which is noisy by ISO 200 and really bad at ISO 800. It's useful for the D200 at high ISO as well.

None of the main software seems to be as good as the specialised noise reduction stuff.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:09:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Have people seen that the free official, web based version of photoshop is available from today?

here

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:39:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"PHOTOS AS USUAL"
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:59:16 AM EST
The keep of Cardiff Castle, it has a moat around it.  The castle and walls are built around the keep.

Photobucket

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:10:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A duck that made the effort to look at the camera properly,
* nudge nudge* to the mallard at the top.

Photobucket

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:13:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Equinox moon night.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 05:50:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tree roots under water on my side, last snow on the nountains on the other side.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:08:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
On the edge of Salka/[Ipoly]szalka, near the recently opened border of Hungary and Slovakia, looking towards the outliers of the Burda mountain. There is a very faint, flat rainbow in the picture.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:15:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fantastic landscape.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:38:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Aint' it?

Yet, for the photographer, the best photos are those not made. Waiting in hope of a better vantage point later, I missed the opportunity of a photo in the opposite direction, with the Sun shining upon falling snow in front of the Börzsöny mountains a few kilometres away, framed by a black cloud above and right.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:53:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh I know the feeling.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 07:26:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 06:50:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Medieval lithographer.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 09:04:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
looks more like a calligraphist to me...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 09:46:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You're absolutely right. Excuse my tired brain :-)

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 10:34:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Medieval embroidery.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 10:46:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Are they real medieval people? Do you have a time machine you haven't told us about?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 10:49:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course, but it's only in the experimental stage and only my camera goes back.  The next thing I'm going to try is to get in it myself and see if I can go back about thirty five years.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 10:57:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
thirty five years? How ambitious.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 11:15:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Rather modest as time machines go.

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 11:32:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And I thought it was an H&M sale...

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 11:45:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I can't seem to embed a flickr photo here... :S

Have a link though...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/24470729@N03/2358864169/

by Torres on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:28:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Aha!

by Torres on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:51:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lovely!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:52:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hmm, i believe this is against flickr user agreement or something... maybe i shouldn't have done it... feel free to delete it, if possible. If not, sorry...
by Torres on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 12:53:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is it not your own photo?  I guess if you acknowledge the source it should be ok. I can't check until I get home, certain sites are off limits through work firewall.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:01:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is my photo but flickr seems to prefer we use the "embed" version, where the photo links to flickr. I was getting HTML errors when trying to do it, so i tried the Eurotrib user recommendations for posting pictures.

This is what they say:

Remember! Flickr Community Guidelines specify that if you post a Flickr photo on an external website, the photo must link back to its photo page. (So, use Option 1.)

by Torres on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:07:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'd fail to worry about that! What error were you getting?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:16:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Your HTML has the following error :

    * Attribute TITLE for tag A is not allowed

The image seems to post allright, its the link embedding that seems to be the problem.

by Torres on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:30:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Any better now?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:37:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
7

Let's see... yep, it works!

by Torres on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 01:57:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Very nice. Where was this taken?

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:20:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you,
this was at the Zoo, in Lisbon.
by Torres on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:12:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It doesn't feel like it but Spring is busting out in my garden. Taken 20 minutes ago.



Hey, Grandma Moses started late!

by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:19:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Swan:

Tunisian beach grass:

Tunisian beach:

Japanese students in Carthage:

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:43:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The detail on the swan is incredible. What lens did you use?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:47:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
These were all taken with my crappy Fuji S7000.

The swan is quite a tight crop, with some Noise Ninja to smooth out the wrinkles.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:50:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fair bit of sharpening afterwards?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 02:55:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
None at all, except for bicubic sharper while resizing.

I think it's partly down to Noise Ninja, which brings out the detail by removing the noise - it's slightly less sharp overall, but all of the important details are clearer, so it looks more detailed.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:03:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Also, I lost an arm just after taking this.

But I wasn't going to mention it.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:04:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't understand this?

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:05:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm guessing the swan didn't like the close-up photo.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:08:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks!

Hey, Grandma Moses started late!
by LEP on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:17:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Huh. Mind you, I don't think I've used NN on a picture with a lot of detail like that. Still getting used to it.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 03:04:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What ISO were you using?

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Mar 28th, 2008 at 04:07:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Display:
Go to: [ European Tribune Homepage : Top of page : Top of comments ]