Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

1. of May Open Thread

by Fran Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:02:27 AM EST

it is also the 'Fête du Muguet'


Display:
How did you spend the "Tag der Arbeit" (labour day) demonstrating? I think that's what we are supposed to do - and that is why the day is off. I always found it interesting the day of Work is celebrated by not working. :-)

At least here in Switzerland, there were 1. of May demonstrations.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:06:00 AM EST
I have been cutting the grass.

Did they ask for social progress and flexible retirement age for all? In these times? The Utopia!

by PerCLupi on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:42:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
PerCLupi:
Did they ask for social progress and flexible retirement age for all? In these times? The Utopia!

Well, when if not now! :-) Actually the other day I read that in 2007 the salaries had a real increase in worth, or whatever that is called in English. And I do believe, if we wait until the time is right (what ever that might mean), it will never happen. So all we really have is the NOW!

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:04:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When I say "in these times" I mean socio-political ideas that run, not the amount of the pension. In accordance with you that NOW is the best.
by PerCLupi on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:11:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Anya returned from Tanz in den Mai, and needed the support of The Maedel Reparatur Werkstatt.  With that i've been busy, my pleasure.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:58:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Er, maybe in your country...  Pretty screwed up, given that Chicago is the reason it even became a workers' holiday.  No one gets the day off here.  

But people are marching for immigrants' rights.  On their lunchbreak or something...

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:10:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Rockefeller family has turned on Exxon (the former Standard Oil) for being environmentally tone deaf.

While other oil firms are exploring alternatives to petroleum Exxon sticks to a single business practice and funds global warming deniers.

My favorite quote:

"There are an awful lot of people who are getting increasingly annoyed with Exxon," said economist Neva Rockefeller Goodwin, a great-granddaughter of the company's founder. "Their [Exxon's] attitude is 'these pesky shareholders, they act as if they own the company'."

The real truth was revealed in this comment, stockholders may "own" a company but they don't control it. This is the breakdown in the capitalist system that nobody talks about.

Here's a link to one version of the story:

Myopic ExxonMobil is ignoring the planet's future, say Rockefellers

Policies not Politics
---- Daily Landscape

by rdf (robert.feinman@gmail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:10:14 AM EST
...stockholders may "own" a company but they don't control it. This is the breakdown in the capitalist system that nobody talks about.

Bingo!

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:17:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One of David Rockefeller's daughters, Abby, was a good friend in the 70's.  Foreseeing the troubles over fresh water, she tried to develop a company making a self-composting toilet called Clivus Multrum.  (Inclined composting room?)  The company's motto was "getyourshittogether."

She was an early adopter of renewable energy technologies, supported our earliest wind energy efforts (in the mid-70's!), and was generally a rebel.  She was living with a passive solar architect from someplace Scaninavian.  I remember being scared to death watching from our motel window, after we'd shared a bowl or two, as her minders sat in their car out on the street (at least in my mind).

One of my chief mentors in early windpower, Paul Montagu Sturges, a classmate of David's at Harvard, thought the Rockefellers were the greatest danger to future civilization.  He considered it a great coup when we installed a Clivus Multrum on our passive house by a mountain stream where we couldn't get permits for a waste system, but with the Clivus we got it built.  Paul and Abby invited Pete Seeger to sing at the opening, sound system set up on the rocks surrounding the stream.

I haven't spoken with Abby over the years, but i'd bet she's still fighting.  And she's a daughter, not a granddaughter, so she's even closer to her father and his policies.

Abby, if you're out there, let's make a ceremony for old times sake, and perhaps the future.  Bet you'd be proud of what i've done.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:29:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Serendipitous, if not weird..

Dunno about Abby, but her son organised the gig I attended in Seattle a couple of weeks ago.

Really nice guy. He said she's always been the black sheep of the family...

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:00:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Does that mean we can´t be mean to the ´elites´ any more?

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:40:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sure, anytime that demonising unspecified groups of people is  what you're looking for, "elites" are the people to go for.

Elite marathon runners are especially pernicious.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 02:13:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Can somebody explain the ridiculous fact that cranberry juice is so horrible, yet so bloody necessary for women ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:20:05 AM EST
Why for women - as far as I know, it is good as an antiseptic for bladder problems, but not only for women.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:22:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think guys get those sorts of problems. I was warned of this when I trnsitioned that I was going from next to no chance to pretty much certainty at one time or another.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:27:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting concept that women get it with next to no chance to pretty much certainty at one time or another.

Yes, guys can get it, but it is much more rare.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:45:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's what I meant. As a male I'd had next to no chance of getting it, wheras as a woman I should more or less accept I was going to get it sooner or later.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:58:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep.  The number of things that could go wrong down there has probably increased exponentially, astronomically, maybe.  The trade off is we can wear heels and underwire bras.  heh.  And menstruate.  And have kids.  Wait, that hurts too.  It's amazing how much women manage to accomplish given the percentage of their lives spent in some form of physical discomfort!

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:07:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Absolute proof that there is no intelligent god, or other.

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:37:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From a engineering POV god is a slacker.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:17:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dang. No heavenly elites we can slag off?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:07:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I almost never wear heels, too long as a guy means it's excrutiating.

Plus there are so many women's shoes that just fall off my feet or give me blisters or ....or. Despite my wishes I'm reduced to trainers most of the time.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:53:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Probably has nothing to do with being a guy.  They are excruciating to everyone, initially.  


"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:56:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, after the age of 25, males start growing bony ridges on joints, ie knuckles, eyebrow ridges etc. They also grow on the feet which means that when you wear heels the ridges dig into the flesh.

Seriously I've tried cos I love wearing heels, I love how they make me feel, but...I can't.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:04:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I never felt comfortable wearing heals, thought i did wear them, because it was more or less demanded workwise. But I stopped wearing them a long time ago and have not regreted it, when I see the problems some of the women get because of the heals. For me it is just not worth it. Besides, if you look you can find lovely flat shoes too.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:11:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've never worn heels to any extent. I mean, why bother? Trainers and slipons are fine for everyday (even at work sometimes!), and there are so many different kinds of flats about that you would never exhaust your choices.

Helen, I never knew that about men's feet, how odd. Of course, it makes me wonder how some of those drag queens manage the monster heels they wear. Those shoes look painful enough as it is without that factored in.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.

by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:29:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They don't wear them for long, or at least they don't move around a lot. Plus, they're often young and haven't grown them much yet

Also different people grow in different ways, I was fortunate in that I don't have huge ridges and so don't have to worry about them on my eyebrows and hands, but they're enough to hurt my feet.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:34:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I haven't got any bony ridges.

What does this mean? (Go easy on me).

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:09:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
(Go easy on me).

Lacking any bony ridges, that may be the only possible way to go on you.

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:23:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't have bad ones either on my eyebrows. I only have slight knuckles too, which is fortunate as it has meant I haven't needed facial cosmetic surgery. Although I still think it would be nice as I've seen the results on a firend and it's amazing.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:14:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have to say that I don't understand what you mean when you talk about bony ridges on your eyebrows, or 'knuckles'?? on your face. Though the surgery sounds intriguing...

I should point out that one of my friends is an FtM, so I've kinda seen a lot of trans stuff from the other side. He has actually written a report about transsexual people and health care in Europe, which I am considering a diary about, just cause he's my friend.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.

by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:24:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, ridges on the knuckles of my hand.

Eyebrow ridges are bony protusions on men's faces. It seems related to manual labour cos you see them regularly on builders etc, but rarely on office workers. I guess ya gotta be looking for them cos mostly we see the face, not the constituent parts.

Talking of essays on transgenderism, here are the three I wrote

Thoughts in a Waiting Room

In the Land between Blue and Pink

Men/Women : Emotions and multi-tasking

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:56:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Very interesting, thanks for the read. Though I must say your thoughts weren't really what I was expecting.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.
by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:44:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'd love to know what you mean by that.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:07:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sometimes you can be pretty cynical or snarky in comments (against the idiots, not us), but those diaries have a completely different tone. They're quite tender really.

Also, I found your analysis of your condition to be different to what I expected. My friend is often quick to overturn common narratives, and rephrase his experiences and insights in entirely new ways.

You also mentioned you were working on a 'transition diary'. Anything come of it?

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.

by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:30:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nothing came of it because I felt that "Thoughts in a Waiting Room" had crossed a line on this site. As if I'd stopped writing about the wider issue and was just being mawkish on my own behalf.

What analysis of my condition did you expect ? I'm curious.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:40:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I suppose you've kinda answered that yourself just now, in the sense that I thought you would push on the wider issues of gender and sexuality, and how they are seen in society. I mean, gender and sexuality are a pretty interesting things to me, and, like my friend, I'm sure I would find your perspective interesting. I can tell you, finding out about FtMs is mind blowing. There are absolutely none anywhere in the media, like I didn't know they even existed.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.
by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:49:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's actually difficult for me to talk about these wider issues because I don't know bout wider society. I don't have an academic approach to such things, don't do research etc. All I can write about is what I see, think and feel.

I hope I made it plain that TGs are less united by their similarities than by their dissimilarities. Each of us has a different experience of our condition, a different understanding of it. It is very easy to read books and trim your personal narrative to fit an attractive wider theory as a form of self-validation. But too many of these books are written by people who early on betray they have no real understanding of the phenomenon. For instance, the entire charing Cross experience is driven by what I consider to be an unsympathetic psychological approach that regards people who aren't dissuaded and proceed to surgery as failures.

So there are no wider views, I extrapolate where I can, but make it plain that I am doing so from a statistical sample of one.

I can only write about what happened to me and how I felt about it.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:06:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
on my twenties-themed party (zoot rules!!!) I dressed like a maffiosi with high heeled boots. By one I stopped dancing, by three I thought the expression "my feet are killing me" was the understatement of the century.

You know, respect for all the shoe diaries and such - but WHY?

Mysteries of life.

by Nomad on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 02:06:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it's an apparent lengthening of the lower half of the leg which is a secondary sexual characteristic and occurs during  puberty in women.So high heel shoes advertise a womans fertility.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 02:30:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is certainly an advertisement. Wearing high heels is essentially saying I am prepared for pain in this forthcomlng relationship.

<ducks and runs very far away>

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:26:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A rather obscure thing to warn you about, isn't it?

I hope that this was quite a bit down the list, after 'some men are pigs', and 'smiling is obligatory'.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.

by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:52:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hardly obscure if, as a woman, I'm more or less guaranteed.

Most women in the UK seem to be of the "all men are bastards" opinion. I've actually had rather terse conversations where my willingness to defend males has been taken as a sign that I'm still not a real woman.

Smiling isn't obligatory, but people are nicer to women so smiling is easier.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:01:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm personally not of the opinion that all men are bastards. Some men are really quite beautiful and wonderful people. But it is true that other men act towards women in a manner which is despicable.

It would depend on the individual actions and character of a man as to whether I would defend him, but I think it unacceptable to abuse whoever chose to do so. The women who insulted you were out of line, and you ought to have come back by asking why the hell they thought they were women? Their answer would have probably been nothing more than some essentialist or constructionist diatribe.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.

by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:51:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Their answer would have probably been nothing more than some essentialist or constructionist diatribe.

It has long been my argument that essentialism displaced feminism in the UK over 30 years ago. The difference between the "feminist" debates in the UK compared to say France or the US is a generational chasm.


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:02:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm personally not of the opinion that all men are bastards. Some men are really quite beautiful and wonderful people.

Phew! I feel relieved...

"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

by Melanchthon on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:04:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
but underneath that of course we are bastards.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:06:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well...I'm sure there are some radfems out there who would agree with you, which is really inhuman of them.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.
by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:24:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've noticed that cranberry juice "cocktail" has been getting sweeter over the years. The latest bottle I bought was so sweet I had to add lemon juice. I'm thinking of trying to make my own next time.

There used to be four flavor groups: sweet, sour, salt and bitter. All but sweet and salt have disappeared from most foods. Try to name a popular food item which is bitter or sour.

I occasionally buy schav (sorrel soup), but this has been sweetened too. The same goes for cabbage soup. And we wonder why so many people are having health and weight problems...

Policies not Politics
---- Daily Landscape

by rdf (robert.feinman@gmail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:31:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
rdf:
sweet, sour, salt and bitter

I would add to this: spicy. I actually try to integrate all five tasts in a meal and try to avoid processed food like the devil. :-) I find if I stay with lots of fresh vegetables I get all tastes easily.

And of course the food companies have to add sugar and salt as it is more addictiv.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:43:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What do you serve that is sour or bitter?

Policies not Politics
---- Daily Landscape
by rdf (robert.feinman@gmail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:47:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bitter, some leafy salads like 'lolo rosso' or endivien. Some fresh olives taste slightly bitter,

Well, sour like from lemon juice or vinegar in the salad sauce, which I always make myself.

and I guess both bitter and sour are also in Helen's cranberries. :-)

That's what comes to mind right now, I am sure if I would think about it more I could think of others too.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:51:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I knew it, just thougth of some more:

as sour are also considered: rhubarb, tomatoes, sauerkraut, yoghurt.

additional bitters can be considered: parsley, celery tops, garlic, onion, dandelion, which you can currently find fresh in the fields.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:57:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tamarind. Assorted other fruits and berries at different ripenesses.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:02:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yoghurt in the US has been transformed into yogurt. It's yet another confection masquerading as a real food.

To wit: DANNON Fruit on the Bottom Blueberry
Serving Size: 6 oz; 170g

Cultured grade A lowfat milk, blueberries, sugar, fructose syrup, high fructose corn syrup, contains less than 1% of modified corn starch, pectin, kosher gelatin, sodium phosphate, malic acid, natural flavor, calcium phosphate. Contains active yogurt cultures including L. acidophilus.

Sugars       25g               
Protein      6g

(By the way this used to come in an 8oz container, it is now 6oz.)

Policies not Politics
---- Daily Landscape

by rdf (robert.feinman@gmail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:07:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yuk, I can feel your pain. :-) then you might have to make it yourself.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:09:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
rdf is citing brand name products sold in the traditional supermarkets here.  But it should be said that organic and unprocessed and otherwise natural foods are becoming increasingly available to the vast majority of Americans.  At first it was just specialized stores like Whole Foods, etc.  But now mainstream chains, even WalMart have increasingly large sections devoted to organic foods.  Which is not to say most Americans don't eat overprocessed food.  I think they do.  But there are alternatives for many people.  

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:17:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Having tasted bulgarian yoghurt, I can't be bothered with anything else.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:54:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, I recently read an American 'how is your health' quiz ( don't ask why), an done of the question was "how much yoghurt do you eat? I ate a lot, and thought that would give me quizkudos. But no, maximum 'bad health' points.
by GreatZamfir on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:05:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
dandelion, which you can currently find fresh in the fields

And in my chemically untreated lawn.  Just what I need-another excuse not to mow it.  ;)

by Sassafras on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:41:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
happy to have been help. If you need some more excuses let me know, I am good at it. :-)
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 03:53:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Beer ought to be bitter and some are also supposed to sour.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:02:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cranberry juice "cocktail" is mostly water and high fructose corn syrup.  

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:58:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In the UK we have things called 'fruit drinks' which are distinct from 'fruit juices.'

Juices are supposed to contain actual juice, almost exclusively. The juice will usually have been macerated within an inch of its life, freeze dried, shipped across the world in a leaky tanker, warmed up and reconstituted before being chilled again. So it's not fresh juice. But it's still juice.

Fruit drinks can apparently contain anything at all including colours, flavours, artificial sweeteners, mayonnaise, glue, and rusty old machine tools. I suspect there's a statutory limit on how little juice manufacturers can get away with. Whatever that limit is, any 'fruit drink' will be right on the line.

Cranberries are supposed to help with prostate cancer. Although that particular research was sponsored by the national cranberry association - or whatever the official title is - so it may be best to take it with a pinch of something sour or bitter.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:03:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Take it with a handful of pumpkin seeds?

Those fruit "drinks" made of juice and sugar and water and whatever are called "nectars" in France.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:18:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think it is the red pigment, lycopene, an anti-oxidant, you may be referring to.  Some studies have shown that men who eat a lot of tomatoes get prostate cancer less.  Who knows. It can't hurt.  

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.
by poemless on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:19:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fruit drinks can apparently contain anything at all including colours, flavours, artificial sweeteners, mayonnaise, glue, and rusty old machine tools.

LOL...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 06:41:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
umeboshi vinegar...mmm

bitter greens, like scarola.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 04:04:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
O Helen, darling, you just haven't been exposed to the heavenly miracle of beverages that is known as a "Cape Cod" (or Cape Codder, pronounced, "Cape Cahddah").

You take some cranberry juice and pour it in a tumbler full of ice.  Then add a significant amt. of vodka.  People don't understand that you need a lot, in order to cut through the strong taste of the juice.  Top off with the juice of a 1/4 of a lime (or more or less, to your taste.)  Drink.  Then make another.

Variations include adding sugar (would only do this if you are using straight cranberry juice, and not cranberry juice cocktail, which is nasty junk anyway) or replacing the vodka with iced tea and adding mint.  

Are cranberries a New World thing?  I love the stuff but will admit it is an acquired taste.  Oh, man, this is making me miss the Cape...

Oh, cranberries are said to prevent & treat urinary tract infections, which women are susceptible to as a result of our anatomy.  (TMI, I know.)  Ain't it grand being a girl?

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:56:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Some of us who hardly ever drink mixed drinks, believe that a Cape Cod is as near to heaven as you can get, especially if it helps other parts of one's being.  Of course, depending on the source of heavenly cranberries.

If you have to drink one when you're actually on the Cape, best mixed with flash boiled fresh corn and a vat or two of spicy clam chowder.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:19:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So true.  Any (good) vodka/(real) fruit juice combo can totally be written off as beneficial to one's health.  The vitamins, the antisceptic, the pain-killing properties.  You can't go wrong.  I don't even know why they aren't served in hospitals!  ;)  

Oh, man.  Now you've got me jonesing for a plate of scallops and fries and a cup of chowder...  The thing abut living in the Midwest is the total absence of fresh shellfish.   Im terribly allergic to the stuff, but manage to crave it anyway...

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:29:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's 'chowda', kids, New England Clam Chowda, as the Maine lobster steams....

Ummm...

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

by metavision on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:48:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, but you know I'm a beer hound. I haven't drunk vodka for decades.

"Ain't it grand being a girl"

Damn right. There's no down to being a girl that is lower than my highest high as a male.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:56:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yuk, yeah I have often wondered the same thing. I really do not like cranberry juice on it's own.  Hope you are getting better though.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:25:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Proanthocyanidins.  They stop bacteria adhering to the membranes that line the bladder.

Two glasses a day (of at least 50% Cranberry juice) may prevent recurrent infection.

But cranberry juice is usually heavily sweetened and that is a lot of refined sugar to be downing on a daily basis...especially if you aren't even enjoying it!

I guess whether it's worth it depends on an individual woman's degree of susceptibility to these infections.  Because it does vary.

On the other hand, though cranberries have the marketing behind them, blueberries also contain proanthocyanidins.  You might find those more palatable?

by Sassafras on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:32:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, the juice I'm drinking has a lot of corn syrup which is pretty yuk, but I'm just putting up with it while I'm sick.

When I'm well I'll go looking for something better. That's a good tip about blueberries, thanks.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:43:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hope you're better soon...
by Sassafras on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:01:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Opening Statement of Rep. Henry A. Waxman Chairman, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Joint Hearing on Oversight of Defense Department Acquisitions (.PDF)
April 29, 2008

Today's hearing is the Committee's tenth hearing this Congress on waste, fraud, and abuse in the federal government.
The subject oftoday's hearing is weapons acquisitions programs at the Department of Defense.

...

We are holding this hearing for a simple reason: Weapons programs at the Defense Department are one of the biggest sources of wasteful spending in the federal budget.

...

There seems to be absolutely no accountability to the taxpayer.

Despite report after report documenting mismanagement in weapons acquisition, nothing seems to improve.

The contractors keep getting rich, senior Pentagon officials keep receiving lucrative job offers, and the taxpayer keeps getting stuck with the check.

...

The contract for building and testing the prototype was a cost-plus contract, so the company got paid even though the vehicle flunked its tests. Incredibly, General Dynamics even received over $60 million in bonuses for its work on the development contract.

What's more, the Marine Corps says that General Dynamics will now get the new contract for $700 to $800 million to build another prototype.

The signal that sends is unmistakable: no matter how bad ajob you do, there will be no accountability.              



The struggle of man against tyranny is the struggle of memory against forgetting.(Kundera)
by Elco B (elcob at scarlet dot be) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 11:49:40 AM EST
And there you have the current US in a nutshell.  Danke Elco B.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:01:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nope, I could tell some stories I know about UK defence procurement.

They're all the same, it's corporate welfare, the only difference is that the US has committees that tut-tut about it. In the UK it's entirely secret.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:52:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dov S. Zakheim and Ronald T. Kadish - One-Stop Defense Shopping - washingtonpost.com

... It was a different story just two decades ago. In the 1980s, 20 or more prime contractors competed for most defense contracts. Today, the Pentagon relies primarily on six main contractors to build our nation's aircraft, missiles, ships and other weapons systems.

It is a system that largely forgoes competition on price, delivery and performance and replaces it with a kind of "design bureau" competition, similar to what the Soviet Union used -- hardly a recipe for success.


The struggle of man against tyranny is the struggle of memory against forgetting.(Kundera)
by Elco B (elcob at scarlet dot be) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:13:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Huh? Methinks that design bureau competition was a recipe for success.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue May 6th, 2008 at 06:06:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
have you read This?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:16:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, I haven't, but I'm sure I can guess from my own limited experience.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:23:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'll bung it in the post at some point if you fancy.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 02:23:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
thank you. Tho one day I need to return your DVDs.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:01:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Whenever, there's no rush.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:43:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Eugene Jarecki laid it all out in a depressing documentary Why We Fight (2005.)  As can be seen from this it had a dismal reception when contrasted to the scale of the problem.

 

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:29:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From Hamburg to Havana, workers march on May Day - International Herald Tribune

BERLIN: Thousands of marchers gathered in Hamburg on May Day to call for more workers's rights, while protesters in Turkey were met with police batons and water cannon.

In Russia on Thursday, marchers called for economic equality, and in Cuba residents hoped their president would offer up more changes.

May 1 is known in Germany and elsewhere as the unofficial International Workers' Day and is typically marked with demonstrations and rallies that can sometimes turn violent.

In Istanbul, Turkish riot police used clubs, tear gas and water cannon to break up crowds of workers and students trying to reach a main square for a Labor Day rally that had been banned by the government.

Six police officers were injured and 467 demonstrators were detained. Thousands of police were on the street after Turkish unions said they would defy the government and hold May Day celebrations in Istanbul's Taksim square, which had been the scene of violent protests decades ago.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:35:44 PM EST
BBC NEWS | Europe | Italy posts income details on web

There has been outrage in Italy after the outgoing government published every Italian's declared earnings and tax contributions on the internet.

The tax authority's website was inundated by people curious to know how much their neighbours, celebrities or sports stars were making.

The Italian treasury suspended the website after a formal complaint from the country's privacy watchdog.

The information was put on the site with no warning for nearly 24 hours.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:36:27 PM EST
Italians certainly needed a day of fun and small revenge.  I hope it gets leaked everywhere.

Beppe Grillo made over €4 million that year.  I´ll try to cricket a lot louder now.

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

by metavision on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:18:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Merkel Receives Award for Promoting European Unity | Europe | Deutsche Welle | 01.05.2008
French President Nicolas Sarkozy praised Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel as she received the prestigious Charlemagne Prize for European leadership. He said she had taught him patience.

European leaders gathered in the German city of Aachen on Thursday, May 1, to pay tribute to Merkel's contributions to European unity.

 

For her part, Merkel reminded Europeans of the progress made the continent has made.

 

"After centuries of violent confrontations, we have created what once could hardly have been imagined -- peaceful and friendly cooperation in Europe," she said in her speech, adding that Europe could serve as a model for other regions.

 

Addressing her as "dear Angela" in a speech of eulogy, Sarkozy said, "She has taught me that hope requires time [to work]."

 

Mutual compliments continued when Merkel replied in French, thanking Sarkozy "from her heart" and praising his "adeptness and honesty" in winning office as president a year ago and "leading France back into the heart of the European Union."

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 12:39:13 PM EST
I don't know why they bother.  Barf.

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 01:11:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC NEWS | Magazine | Did LSD change Britain?

For Gregory Sams and his brother Craig an LSD trip at Berkeley in California in 1967 provided an epiphanal moment that led them to London to spark a major change in British eating habits.

"It was as a direct consequence of my brother and myself taking LSD that we introduced natural and organic foods in the UK. At that point people were looking forward to the day we all live on vitamin pills. Today you can't open a newspaper without reading about organic foods."

After the trip Gregory and Craig thought long and hard about what people were eating. They decided they were fed up with a Western diet big on garish food dyes, additives and cheap meat.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 02:36:11 PM EST
BBC NEWS | Wales | South West Wales | Fault halts refinery production

Production at the Chevron oil refinery at Pembroke has stopped because of a mechanical fault.

A Chevron spokesman said repairs are being carried out after the problem with a boiler on Tuesday night.

No fuel is being produced but there is a "good supply" of stocks of oil, which is exported to the US and Europe, as well as serving the UK.

The refinery, which first opened in 1964 and employs 1,200, processes 220,000 barrels of crude oil a day.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 02:37:47 PM EST
Much ado about nothing thank goodness. The refinery has two weeks stocks and they announced they'll be back to full production by Tuesday

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 03:59:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
CIA Chief Sees Unrest Rising With Population
By Joby Warrick, Washington Post

Swelling populations and a global tide of immigration will present new security challenges for the United States by straining resources and stoking extremism and civil unrest in distant corners of the globe, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden said in a speech yesterday...

European countries, many of which already have large immigrant communities, will see particular growth in their Muslim populations while the number of non-Muslims will shrink as birthrates fall. "Social integration of immigrants will pose a significant challenge to many host nations -- again boosting the potential for unrest and extremism," Hayden said.

The CIA director also predicted a widening gulf between Europe and North America on how to deal with security threats, including terrorism. While U.S. and European officials agree on the urgency of the terrorism threat, there is a fundamental difference -- a "transatlantic divide" -- over the solution, he said.

While the United States sees the fight against terrorism as a global war, European nations perceive the terrorist threat as a law enforcement problem, he said.

"They tend not to view terrorism as we do, as an overwhelming international challenge. Or if they do, we often differ on what would be effective and appropriate to counter it," Hayden said. He added that he could not predict "when or if" the two sides could forge a common approach to security.

Since the Bush administration changed counter-terrorism efforts into a "war", terrorism has risen around the world. The U.S. approach of making everything into a war has failed. It is the wrong strategy.

by Magnifico on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 03:14:40 PM EST
The U.S. approach of making everything into a war has failed.

But it seems so much more...Presidential doesn't it ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 03:58:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How incredibly 'imaginative':

Fear them.  Fear us, fear you.  Fear up, fear down and all around.  Solution: milind complex and war!  There are no other possibilities...

Where do these people exist???

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.

by metavision on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:26:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's local elections in Wales (Scotland, London and parts of England) today.  I've been up since 5.45 and out leafletting and campaigning.

Horrified to find that my local polling station had no booths, just tables with notice boards alongside that left me to cast my vote in full view of the tellers who thought I was being stupid and awkward and said it wasn't their fault when I complained about lack of privacy.  Hello? Illegal.  

We called the Electoral the Electoral Commission to get them to address the situation.

So, a long day. Stopping off home for dinner and then I'm out to watch the count.

Photography blog tomorrow will be Spring, Ask the Experts, and Photos as Usual.
See you there.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:05:08 PM EST
5:45 !!!! Wow, I never did that ever.

Wales is a different country but Labour are gonna get creamed in England. Brown can say what he likes, the 10p thing wasn't an isolated aberration, but has been taken by a lot of people to be emblemetic of his indifference to anybody but the super-rich. Amazingly people will protest by voting Tory, a party that is even worse.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:14:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well in my polling station I was faced with a choice between Plaid and Lib Dem. I don't think the plaid candidate liked my question the other day of what's the difference between the Welsh nationalist party and the British national party?

The Lib dem candidate managed to get bonus points by stopping to give me a lift towards home just as it started to hail.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:35:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We couldn't get enough people to stand to cover all wards.  Which incidentally is how at least one BNP councillor now exists in Wales because they stood unopposed and got elected.  How the fuck did that manage to happen?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:42:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That is a colossal failure, letting that idiot get through.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:03:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
During an election campaign a candidate is not allowed to buy anthing in case they be accused of buying votes.

One of my friends said it was great cos he wasn't allowed to buy a round for an entire month. Giving you a lift is surely a favour in kind....you've been bought.

I like the plaid question.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:42:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
several years ago I was living in a community based round a house. which included a couple living in a caravan, and a couple of others living in a battered old ambulance. one of the local tories was running a campaign of intimidation against us through the council and the local papers. however he lived two villages away, and we were very popular in our local community for various reasons once the local  community matriach got to know us.

just before an election  where there was a combined Plaid/green candidate standing for MP we had our regular visit from the council planning department to tell us to move the lived in vehicles. During the conversation the council official asked if we were voting. having said yes he asked whether it was Plaid/green we would be voting for, having said yes, he said that if we went round and put a load of Plaid  posters up, then he'd leave us alone for six months which was as long as he could put off an inspction without being obvious.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:58:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Labour will get knocked down in Wales too but I really hope we keep our councillor.  I very much doubt we will get control of our county council back.  Brown's recent actions and comments will hurt us.

I think the campaign has done me good, whether we win or lose.  I've seen all areas of my community, how people live, the issues they are facing. It's reaffirmed to me how incredibly selfish that the wealthier sections of the ward are.

It's reminded me of some of the most basic things that I spend my job fighting over - things like literacy, standard of living, poverty, racism, equality - but often never 'see' it for myself and recently I have.  

When I was leafletting today a man came out of his house and said to me "who's the coloured man?" (I realised he meant our candidate) I told him the name. Then he showed me the leaflet I'd put through the door and asked me to show him where the name was on there because he wanted to vote for us. He couldn't read.  He wanted to cast his vote but couldn't read to do so.

How do you exercise your democratic rights properly without basic literacy?  Here in Wales we have a very pro trade union Government, very pro social justice, investing a lot of money in our basic literacy and numeracy courses and other courses for upskilling workers and we are lucky to have that. Under a tory Government that funding would no doubt be heavily if not completely cut.  I do often think that if people think things are bad under Labour they'll get a horrible shock if the Tories make it back in.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:40:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How do you exercise your democratic rights properly without basic literacy?  Here in Wales we have a very pro trade union Government, very pro social justice, investing a lot of money in our basic literacy and numeracy courses and other courses for upskilling workers and we are lucky to have that. Under a tory Government that funding would no doubt be heavily if not completely cut.  I do often think that if people think things are bad under Labour they'll get a horrible shock if the Tories make it back in.

If only we had a labour party in Westminster that understood its obligations so clearly.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 04:45:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Unfortunately it's being paid for by shorting the funding in senior schools. I can think of three local senior schools which are saying that they are going to have to ask for staff to take voluntary redundancy, and the capitation figure has been so low that books and stationary have been in short supply.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:01:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's interesting, I don't think I would have expected literacy to be much of an issue in the UK.  In most of Africa, including here, each party or candidate has a symbol that appears on both the ballots and the campaign posters, so one need not be able to read in order to mark one's ballot.  In some countries, the ballots also have a picture of the candidate, and/or a hand signal associated with the party.  (Example: in Zimbabwe, the ruling Zanu-PF party is a clenched fist, while the opposition MDC is an open hand.)  Those hand signals are also represented on the ballots.

In Jordan, the parliamentary ballots ALL seem to require that the voters write in the name of the candidate, there are no boxes to check, or at least there weren't in 2003.  I was puzzled by this and asked my colleague, "What about people who can't write?"  And she looked at me like I'd lost my mind:  "Nobody can't write."  Which is not actually true (Jordan's overall adult literacy rate is around 90 percent) but probably is fairly close to true in the urban areas and among the younger parts of the population.

by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:30:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
stormy!

I saw this and thought of you:

Face to Face | i love typography, the typography blog

Nadine Chahine is an incredibly talented Lebanese type designer with a very special interest in Arabic typography. She taught Arabic type design as a visiting lecturer at the American University in Dubai and then joined Linotype, Germany, where she is now in charge of Sales Marketing and Arabic-related projects. As of September 2007 she is also a PhD candidate and her topic is legibility studies for the Arabic script.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:59:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oooooohhh.... very excellent.  Thanks!
by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 06:07:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's enough of an issue in areas like mine where there are higher proportions of immigrants and large pockets of poverty.  Also New Labour changed their symbol to a funked up rose that isn't very recognisable as a rose anymore so that doesn't help with symbol recognition.

Even with high literacy, are there not a lot of spoils where ballots are hand written?

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 02:42:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
I do often think that if people think things are bad under Labour they'll get a horrible shock if the Tories make it back in.

Elections in the UK are lost, not won. They're popularity contests, not policy contests.

I'm not sure how many people have any sense of policy at all. Voting seems to be punitive, which makes it easy to manipulate results with scare stories and resentment journalism.

Oddly enough it's not usually explained that voting for greasy wobble-chinned public school crooks isn't going to do working people any favours.

It doesn't help that both of the main parties are now run by greasy wobble-chinned public school crooks. I'd guess that only confuses people.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:45:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have a list of people I want to punch.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 02:37:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Need some help?
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 02:41:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh go on then, get everything out of our system!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 02:42:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Your tellers were allowed into the polling station? I worked as a teller for 3h today and I had to stay outside.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:34:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I may have the wrong word. I mean the people who are paid to staff the polling station. It was our agent who came in to inspect the venue, as is his job.  I went in to vote, as is my right!  Neither of us wore or carried any campaign materials whilst we were in there.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 02:29:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I assume this is now officially the section for election results? If so, does anybody know realistically when the results for the London Mayoral election will be announced?

Sadly, my area is not having an election, but I'm interested in what will happen in Sheffield, West Lindsey, and even Grimsby. It would be weird if that became a Conservative controlled town.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.

by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:43:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Im trying to find exit polls for London but failing... All indications are that Boris will win, though.


When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:47:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just seen the police car go past thats carrying our ballot box

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:57:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC have two results at the mo: Sunderland is no change, and Tamworth has lost one Labour and gained one Conservative. Nothing paticularly interesting really, though holding up in Sunderland is a goodish sign for Labour.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.
by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:28:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Lib Dems gained one seat in Newport and took control of Hull.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:38:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Lib Dems already had control of Hull, since last year.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.
by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:43:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
LOL, shows how much I know.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:43:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC NEWS | Politics | At-a-glance: Local elections
With 70 key wards now declared, it continues to look as though it will be a relatively good night for the Tories, and a bad night for the Lib Dems, while Labour can look forward to at best doing much as it did in 2004 and 2007.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:20:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, BBC were saying the same thing, so maybe I was wrong. I could have sworn...

Anyways, Conservatives have gained west Lindsey, which is no big surprise, to be honest, given that their MP is Edward Leigh, who is a fully paid up member of that party with a big majority.

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.

by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:23:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Granted, it's only 12 out of 159 councils "declared", but the BBC is showing a huge swing from Labour to the Tories.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:26:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Conservatives seem to have managed to take seats from both Labour and Lib Dems in sufficient numbers. Looking at Southampton it is quite something.

Maybe Boz will win in London after all. Criky! As he might say...

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.

by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:09:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We lost our seat to the lib dem candidate whose campaign has been full of lies and negativity.  I could say a lot more about another candidate too but I won't.  I will diary either later or over the weekend about my experiences as part of the campaign, it's been really interesting.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 02:32:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Vanity fair - James Walcott - When Democrats Go Post-al

In a really good essay (3 pages) Walcott expalins the frustrations behind the fervour of the Democratic Primary war

Once Edwards dropped out of the race, however, the buffer zone was removed, direct contact replaced triangulation, and the Obama and Hillary supporters faced off like the Jets and the Sharks. The rancor was disproportionate in intensity and extravagant in invective, a fervor worthy of ancestral foes. Months-old grievances seethed and erupted as if they had been bubbling for centuries in a lake of bad blood. On the most egoistic plane, it seemed like a clash of entitlements, the messianics versus the menopausals.
..............
Such fratricidal skirmishing may sound silly and minor-league, like a feud between high-school cliques where the two sides sit on opposite ends of the bleachers, texting each other inappropriate messages full of misspellings and nonperforming grammar. But there is a deeper frustration at work, a more unappeasable, unaddressed anger. And that is the failure of Democrats and activists to bring the Bush-Cheney administration to account for any of its destructive and disastrous misdeeds over the last seven years (even raising the possibility of impeachment was treated as poor etiquette by the queasy Democratic leadership), the impotent fury over the knowledge that the masters of disaster will leave the White House unscathed, unaccountable, their smirks intact. There will be no day of reckoning, nothing to stop their clean getaway.


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:01:19 PM EST
I don't buy that last bit at all. Neither of the candidates give a shit about what Bush has done. They want to be president. That's it. We don't live in a political climate where energies can be directed any other way.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:26:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think Walcott is talking about Clinton or Obama, he's talking about the grass roots who are really pissed off by the Bush-appeasement coming from the Democrats in DC. As exemplified by Jay Rockefeller and the Bush Dogs still cravenly scheming to pass retrospective telco amnesty.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:35:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think it's going to pass.  Rockefeller can scheme all he likes.  It passed the Senate, but Pelosi surprisingly grew a set and killed it in the House.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:39:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Which is why it's so utterly craven. And sadly remains emblemetic of the Democrats in DC.

Nobody credits Pelosi for standing strong, everybody just sees democrats carrying water for the repugnican evisceration of the Constitution.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:44:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I certainly give her credit on it.  I was damned proud of her when I heard about it.  Setting aside the war, FISA is a top issue for me.  They shouldn't have any fucking immunity.  Not for past wiretapping, not for present or future wiretapping.  If they've done it without the government having a warrant, we should have every right to sue the shit out of the telecoms.  The Chimp can throw all the temper tantrums he wishes to throw.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:54:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What's really eating at Democrats on the two sides of the Obama-Clinton war is a complex topic.  Some of it is shallow, other parts of it go very deep.  It all depends on which faction of the party you're looking at.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:42:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You mean apart from the fact that Obama is sort of a soft-progressive, as long as no one minds and we can all get along, while Clinton is having a fully fledged psychotic episode live on national TV?

On the up side, Bush seems to have become the President no one cares about. The 9/11 wrrrr on trrrr has run out of rhetorical steam, and no matter how much he bobs and smirks and flaps his arms around, no one is paying attention any more.

I don't expect he'll stand trial for anything much, even though people are still dying pointlessly. But if Obama wins there may be some constitutional changes which will make an outbreak of Chimp 2.0 a little less likely.

I suppose Bush could still try to do the Iran thing as a final parting fuck you, but I think he'd run into a solid wall of WTF from pretty much everyone if he tried that. Cheney will still be masturbating over pictures of fall-out patterns, but the chances of the happy explosion he's so desperate for are looking increasingly remote.

We may have to console ourselves with the thought that when Cheney leaves he'll very likely be thinking of himself as a failure - because he didn't make the president emperor of everything, and because Iran will still have people living in it who aren't radioactive and dead.

Which is going to be small beer, but better than nothing.

Chimpy will go back to his usual lettuce-like level of sentience on the speaking circuit. He'll be invited to events where no one is going to care what he has to say, so he'll finally have the uncritical adoring audiences he's always wanted - and would have had much earlier, if it hadn't been for those pesky Democratics.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:16:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hey, don't demean her.  She's having that psychotic episode on televisions the world over.  And what's Cheney sad about?  Obama won't nuke Iran, sure, but he's still got Lady MacBeth and the Depends mascot, and either one would be happy to teach the Iranians to glow in the dark.

I mean the factions of the party backing each one, not the actual candidates themselves.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:26:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
True, there seems to be very little space between McCain and Lady McCain.

But Cheney can't win this - because if someone else does it, it just won't feel the same.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:54:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Indeed, and it'll be nice so long as nobody actually launches a nuke.  My fear is that Clinton opened the door and inched the political establishment closer to accepting the premise that nuclear strikes were reasonable to consider.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 09:02:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
[Moustache of Understanding Alert]
Dumb as We Wanna Be

It is great to see that we finally have some national unity on energy policy. Unfortunately, the unifying idea is so ridiculous, so unworthy of the people aspiring to lead our nation, it takes your breath away. Hillary Clinton has decided to line up with John McCain in pushing to suspend the federal excise tax on gasoline, 18.4 cents a gallon, for this summer's travel season. This is not an energy policy. This is money laundering: we borrow money from China and ship it to Saudi Arabia and take a little cut for ourselves as it goes through our gas tanks. What a way to build our country.



When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:28:45 PM EST
I've been quite pleased with how people have responded to this so far.  Virtually all economists -- left, right, center, all of'em -- have denounced it.  And the press is actually doing its job for a change by reporting it as "Economists say it blows."  And rather than back down, Obama's running ads on it, while Pelosi's out telling McCain and Clinton to basically go fuck themselves.

Very nice.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:15:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That column is a must-read piece.  Now I understand why it had shot up to #1 on the New York Times' "most emailed" list.

What he writes is truly is head-exploding:

Few Americans know it, but for almost a year now, Congress has been bickering over whether and how to renew the investment tax credit to stimulate investment in solar energy and the production tax credit to encourage investment in wind energy. The bickering has been so poisonous that when Congress passed the 2007 energy bill last December, it failed to extend any stimulus for wind and solar energy production. Oil and gas kept all their credits, but those for wind and solar have been left to expire this December. <...>

"It's a disaster," says Michael Polsky, founder of Invenergy, one of the biggest wind-power developers in America. "Wind is a very capital-intensive industry, and financial institutions are not ready to take `Congressional risk.' They say if you don't get the [production tax credit] we will not lend you the money to buy more turbines and build projects."

It is also alarming, says Rhone Resch, the president of the Solar Energy Industries Association, that the U.S. has reached a point "where the priorities of Congress could become so distorted by politics" that it would turn its back on the next great global industry -- clean power -- "but that's exactly what is happening." If the wind and solar credits expire, said Resch, the impact in just 2009 would be more than 100,000 jobs either lost or not created in these industries, and $20 billion worth of investments that won't be made.



A language is a dialect with an army and navy.
by marco on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:14:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The moustache's channelling Jerome! Is it the end of the world? Are we about to wake up from our Long Neoliberal Nightmare?

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:20:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Migeru: The moustache's channelling Jerome!

Actually, on the topic of green energy and "green jobs", Friedman has been on the ball for at least two years now.  I do give him credit for that, and for am grateful to him for making it one of the major recurring themes in his columns.

Having said that, Friedman wrote this in October 2007:

"If we can get these youth in on the ground floor of the solar industry now, where they can be installers today, they'll become managers in five years and owners in 10. And then they become inventors," said Mr. Jones. "The green economy has the power to deliver new sources of work, wealth and health to low-income people -- while honoring the Earth. If you can do that, you just wiped out a whole bunch of problems.

The Green-Collar Solution in October 2007

Jérôme wrote this in December 2006.

If renewable energy can create lots of jobs (and it can) while helping to solve the energy crisis, it's an obvious win-win. <...>

Renewable energy is a job-rich, technology-rich industry, and it is close to being competitive on its own: smart, consistent support, even on a limited scale, can have a big effect. <...>

Thus Democrats need to bring up their ideas to the business press. Remember how Jim Webb brought populism to the editorial pages of the Wall Street Journal? Well the same must be done about energy, because the solutions of the Democrats and the Republicans could not be more different.

How to claim the energy battleground

Putting aside the sad fact that Clinton and McCain seem to be on the same dumb side now with respect to the gas tax holiday, one does wonder if perhaps more media bigshots are reading more progressive blogs like EuroTrib (in particular, Jérôme's pieces) than they would rather be caught dead than admit to.

A language is a dialect with an army and navy.

by marco on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:50:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Journalists do read blogs.  Some more so than others.  Some have even been able to integrate fairly well with the blogosphere.  But stories from the blogs really only get pushed when the blogs explode over something that viewers can easily understand.  JedReport's video on Hillary's Tuzla trip was one of the greatest examples ever.  Jed put it up on dKos and digg, the video went viral, and -- voila! -- the story was front-page, above-the-fold news the next day.

Otherwise, you have cases like Jerome's, where an issue and theme is hammered constantly for months or even years, and finally it begins to creep in as, through events, it becomes an easy sell to the press.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:58:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]

I'll have to check out that JedReport video.

Drew J Jones: Otherwise, you have cases like Jerome's, where an issue and theme is hammered constantly for months or even years, and finally it begins to creep in as, through events, it becomes an easy sell to the press.

I hear you.  Still, see this comment: Friedman has arguably been at the leading edge of the media-blogosphere push to make green industry and renewable energy a central public policy issue in the U.S.

A language is a dialect with an army and navy.

by marco on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 09:08:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's the JedReport video: Very funny.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 09:11:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, very funny.  Very well done.  And very depressing.

A language is a dialect with an army and navy.
by marco on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 09:18:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
marco: Actually, on the topic of green energy and "green jobs"

Sorry, that "green jobs" should have been "green economy", as the column I was thinking of did not specifically mention American jobs in the green sector:

As an American, I worry that if we don't start doing everything we can to develop our own clean power, we're going to miss out on the green industrial revolution. Today, most of our hybrid cars are imported from Japan. Tomorrow, if Mr. Shi has his way, most of our solar panels will come from China.

For years our brain-dead Congress thought it was helping our power companies and manufacturers by not imposing tough energy-efficiency standards on them. In fact, it was just helping some of them commit suicide. Congress's idiotic decision not to impose higher mileage standards on U.S. carmakers helped Detroit miss the market and almost go bankrupt. China already has higher mileage standards for its autos than we do.

China is setting high standards for renewables, but is still weak on enforcement. America is better at enforcement, but still weak on setting high standards. We need to get our act together, because eventually China will bring its enforcement in line with its regulations -- or it won't breathe. And when that happens, China's emerging green power entrepreneurs could clean our clock in the clean power business.

Oh, well, you can always buy a share. Suntech is already listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

China's Sunshine Boys (December 6, 2006)



A language is a dialect with an army and navy.
by marco on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 09:02:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Renewable energy does not mean an end to corporate control of politics, militarism, unsustainable growth patterns, or even "finance capitalism."

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 12:42:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
that financial capitalism focusing on renewable energy would not be such a bad thing, though...

(Obligatory disclosure: I'm a financier focusing on renewable energy...)

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 08:12:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And how about this for an ending?
The McCain-Clinton proposal is a reminder to me that the biggest energy crisis we have in our country today is the energy to be serious -- the energy to do big things in a sustained, focused and intelligent way. We are in the midst of a national political brownout.


When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:22:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The ending metaphor even made sense.  WTF?  Who the Hell fixed him?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:28:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He's getting in on the next big industry bandwagon, and getting the hell off of the USS Neocon before it goes under along with everyone else that isn't a true believer.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 12:35:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
and yeah yeah, he's more of a neolib...

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 12:37:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yup.

Jesus, is it too reckless to hope that this stuff is finally trickling out to the general public and really into people's heads?

(I just posted the article on my Facebook account.  I am very curious to see if anyone responds to it.)

A language is a dialect with an army and navy.

by marco on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:30:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The "green jobs" and "green industry" wording has been getting plastered all over the business press for the past half year or so.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 12:40:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
... but it's already reached the stage where it's called a "bubble"...

It was impossible for these idiots to see the huge bubbles in front of their noses a few years back, but now that we see actual underlying trends changing (moving away from oil), these are dismissed as unsusutainable (because that's what "bubble" means).

Wankers.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 08:14:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Just heard on the radio, the BBC's exit polls say Boris has won the role as London Mayor. It's not the result but....

Stupid Stupid Stupid Stupid Stupid Idiots.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 05:46:27 PM EST
I've said it before and remain confident that a Boris win in London is the death knell for Cameron in Britain.

Boris will be so spectacularly bad that his close association with Cameron will be a lead weight on the tories, Labour will be able to say, "as Boris does, so will the Tories".

and it will be right under the national media's nose, the Evening Standard will try to emulate the Beltway blowhards in ignoring how crap he is but sooner or later, in order to protect their credibility, they'll have to start painting him as the idiot he is.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:02:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I did like the reported Boris Interview, when he got distinctly evasive upon being asked about wether there were any more affairs to come out. On the grounds that he couldn't remember how many he'd admitted to.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:10:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This city is going to become unlivable by the time we get a chance to boot the idiot out.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:21:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm assuming Boris Johnson is a Tory.  What's his deal?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:23:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He's a clown.

Ken Livingstone ran full-page ads in the papers yesterday saying "don't vote for a joke, vote for London".

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:26:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He certainly looks like a clown, or, really, more like a character out of Little Britain.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:28:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From a year ago...

Guardian Unlimited | Comment is free | Boris the jester, toff, serial liar and sociopath for mayor

What about Boris the sociopath? Apart from being caught often lying to all and sundry - he was fired from the Times for making up a quote - how has he survived the Darius Guppy scandal when he was recorded agreeing to find a journalist's contact details so old Etonian friend Guppy could have the man beaten up? How badly? Guppy suggested just a few cracked ribs. Later when Guppy was jailed for a £1.8m insurance fraud, Boris explained his role with: "Oh poor old Darry was in a bit of a hole. He was being hounded." Can Cameron really get through nearly a year's mayoral campaign by just laughing and saying, as he does, "Boris is Boris"? If he were to win, Cameron would be in a worse hole still.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:45:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Poor Cameron.  This is quite a character.  Your very own Reverend Wright.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:52:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
not just that but he was one of Camerons best friends at school.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:56:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is an amazing case of miscalculation. The only reason Johnson is the Tory candidate is that nobody else "serious" would take on Ken because they all thought Ken would rout them. And it turned out Ken was beatable.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:53:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bizarrely, Boris has managed to paint himself as a folk hero.

The British like naughty. Labour seems so dour and serious in comparison.

So Boris is really quite popular, because so many morons think a bit of naughty will do London some good - and it'll be two fingers to that grumpy old git Ken with his bolshy ways, his congestion charge, and his ferrets.

That's about the level of discourse we can look forward to.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:58:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and his ferrets

?

Don't tell me he went all Rudy Mussolini on London.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:06:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
European Tribune - The first London Mayoral Debate
But the point is that being a former police commander doesn't make Paddick automatically the strongest candidate on crime, especially in the eyes of the press. And, on this note, the promised authoritarian bend of Ken Livingstone: he didn't just say that crime has improved in London because he's puched for having more police on patrol, but  that he referred to Rudolph Guiliani as a model a couple of times. Here he had a debate with Paddick on crime figures. Ken had promised that following the Guiliani model and bringing more police on the street would eventually reduce crime by 50% - we're clearly not there yet. The issue is that the Metropolitan Police's own statistics show a 20%-25% decrease in crime figures but Paddick pointed out the British Crime Survey (apparently based on a few thousand interviews with residents) which doesn't show a decline in the incidence of crime.


When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:09:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, but I was wondering about the ferret reference.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:14:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It was a famous 80s soundbite - 'Red Ken', as he was then, kept pet ferrets. This made him seem dangerously proletarian and was clear evidence of militant tendencies.

I don't think Livingstone is an idiot - he's at least tried to put together some kind of transport plan for London, which is more than Boris will do. And he wasn't popular with Blair and Brown for his very public dislike of the PPP schemes which he was forced to use - one of which wasted at least £3bn of public money for very little result.

But he has drited towards authoritarianism, which isn't going to win him any votes.

Like Nu Labour, if he loses it's going to be because of popularity, not because of his actual record - which isn't an unmitigated success, but is probably as good as anyone can expect from the current crop of UK politicians.

I have nostalgic reasons for liking him. When he was head of the GLC during Thatcher's hell-in-a-handbasket years, he tried to cut the cost of using tubes and busses down to positively European levels - at least until Thatcher abolished the GLC from under him.

So I think his intentions are good, but he does have an egomaniac side which doesn't make him very likeable, and often leaves him less effective than he could be.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:47:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
By the way, Livingstone is an idiot.  The drop in crime predated Rudy! and his "Beat the Niggers Senseless" policing.

Not that I'd expect Livingstone to be anything other than an idiot on policing, this being the guy who has apparently turned London, with the help of Parliament, into Airstrip One minus the "steamers".

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:18:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]

this is a photo from His Eton days, it's a pic of a drinking club, a sort of Junior skull and bones if you will.
number 2 is David Cameron, and number 8 Boris Johnson.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:54:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is this the club one of whose purposes is to trash restaurant dining halls?

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:56:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thats the one

I think the unnumbered one is Darius Guppy, but am not sure. It's not noted on the key, but I'd always been told hewas on this picture

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:57:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That is an amazingly bad picture.  Jesus, it's every awful '80s pop video I've ever seen, all in one still.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:01:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Only, not actually a pop video.

And they really do dress like that. Still.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:48:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The outfits wouldn't be as bad if not for the hair styles.  The mullet alone should disqualify Cameron from ever entering 10 Downing St.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:57:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Surely Oxford, no?

Member of the Anti-Fabulousness League since 1987.
by Ephemera on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:59:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
D'oh yes, post eton  what was I thinking, been reading too much onBoris today.

Cameron: from Eton drugs to Oxford excess - Telegraph

The Bullingdon Club, satirised by Evelyn Waugh as the Bollinger Club in Decline and Fall, is not the naughtiest club in Oxford. The Assassins is more eccentric, the Piers Gaveston more erotic and the Stoics more emetic.

But Buller is the most solidly, reassuringly, predictably, ritualistically naughty of the dining societies.

Over 150 years, it has evolved from a club devoted to the pleasures of hunting things and playing cricket, into a club devoted to breaking things and passing out and dinners that cost £100 a head and more.

Brasenose contemporaries say Mr Cameron was a fringe member of the sub-species Bullingdon Man.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:06:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How can anyone with that in their CV be elected to public office? "I'm a spoiled yob."

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:11:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
simple, he's not the communist.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:15:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, but I thought y'all were supposed to run shrieking with terror at the very mention of yobs?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:17:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe that's where Cameron's hoodie hugging comes from.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:18:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yobs are working-class. These thugs are upper-class.

Say what you like, but the English still know what goes in what drawer.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 02:09:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
WHy is Boris the only one with trousers a couple sizes too small?

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:00:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can just see his stuttering response to that question.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:35:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In many ways he's Britain's Bush. Out of touch, doesn't do detail, doesn't so much delegate as abdicates responsibility.

Gratuitously offensive to minorities, superficial. Often hasn't even done the background reading on the issues upon which he's deciding. As somebody once said, "he's hugely ambitious, but lazy, so he gets other people to do the work and then elbows them out of the way". He's stepped on a lot of heads on the way up.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:53:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He's a total liability and the Tories will have to micromanage him to prevent huge embarassment. Which of course isn't possible so they'll dig their own graves in London soon enough.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 09:31:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Waddaya mean become ?? I've been telling you since you arrived to get the heck out.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:54:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Heh.  I was going to ask the same thing.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:58:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
After the reelections of Bush and Berlusconi, how can you remain confident?

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 07:22:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
for a Tory to be in charge of the City, as it is about to go down and crash under its own weight...

Sweet.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 08:15:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
AFAIK, he isn't in charge of the City of London, which is run by a fuedal institution called the City of London Corporation a body which has its own entirely separate Lord Mayor.

It truly is of the banks, for the banks, by the banks because directors of financial insitituions are able to vote irrepsecitve of where they live. As there are hardly any residents, it's the banks whose voice dominates.

Most of the voters live in the West End or have farms in Buckinghamshire or Oxfordshire to the North West.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 08:45:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
but London will still reel from the weakness of the City, and he can be blamed for it, however unfair that may be personally.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 10:48:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One would like to think so, but I imagine it will be Brown who takes the heat for this. After all, Johnson wasn't even in charge when it happened and Johnson has no function in doing anything about the fallout.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri May 2nd, 2008 at 10:53:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Link?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:18:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hard Times, but Your Lips Look Great  |  NY Times
Lipstick May Be an Economic Indicator

After the terrorist attacks of 2001 deflated the economy, Mr. Lauder noticed that his company was selling more lipstick than usual. He hypothesized that lipstick purchases are a way to gauge the economy. When it's shaky, he said, sales increase as women boost their mood with inexpensive lipstick purchases instead of $500 slingbacks.

Beauty brands remain true believers in the theory, even though in the last few years the lipstick market has fallen on hard times as its glistening cousin, lip gloss, has had robust sales.

With the specter of another recession, brands like Clinique and DuWop Cosmetics are preparing for a big year in lip color, for two reasons.

First, they would like to see a return to lipstick, which usually costs slightly more than gloss. Second, the companies believe that in down times women will continue to splurge on lip lacquer even as they make do with last season's dress.

But do economists, and not just companies that need to move a lot of lip color, believe that lipstick sales could skyrocket as the economy tanks? And what's the draw of lipstick in particular for women worried about having to pay as much for gas as they would a handbag?

Hmmm.  I just bought three lipsticks and a lipliner from MAC last weekend....

by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 06:38:25 PM EST


Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu May 1st, 2008 at 08:35:40 PM EST


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