Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

So where are y'all from?

by JakeS Mon May 25th, 2009 at 06:38:50 PM EST

This post in the most recent train wreck community building exercise got me thinking. Specifically, I thought "that's actually a good question. How did all these people get here in the first place?"

Myself, I got here because I was following the American anti-creationist scene, and had been doing so since I discovered creationism sometime in high school (I remain fascinated by the power of people to believe these things not simply on no evidence but in spite of literally mountains of contradicting evidence... but that's for another time).

In short order, that got me into the orbit of Seed Magazine's Scienceblogs collective, where I encountered a link to a blog contest (I think it was Orac, of Respectful Insolence, who posted the link). ET was nominated in the category "Best non-American blog," so I figured I'd check it out (can't cast a vote uninformed, after all...). And here I am. Still go to Scienceblogs occasionally, on a slow news day or when I want to leave the echo chamber.

So what's your story?

- Jake


Display:
Well, I see I posted my first Diary here in September 2006, and as I recall I arrived here by googling "Iran Oil Bourse" and coming across Jerome's critique of its likelihood of success.

Something like that, anyway. It might have been via the Oil Drum.

Anyway.

Here I am, but my Diary days are pretty much over. Just the odd LQD these days.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Mon May 25th, 2009 at 07:32:08 PM EST
is no loser to reality today than then, as predicted... (just like their LNG projects).

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 12:40:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not technically true. The Iran oil bourse exists.

The problem is, it's a glorified spreadsheet domiciled in Kish Island where the odd petrochemical transaction is registered.

Nothing to do with me, squire. The Oil ministry never wanted it, and they call the shots, so they kicked it into the long grass years ago.

Never mind LNG - even when the money was rolling in their investment was actually reducing. The problem is a combination of more effective sanctions and a managerial vacuum on a cosmic scale.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 01:17:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You guys and your supreme memory units...I must say that I don't think it was through DKos that I discovered ET, but it may have been.

I was pretty dismayed by their soft liberal slant long before I came here, but I would still use them as a source of news when something was going on. I also remember being upset with Josh Marshall in TPM's early days...there were just so many clever people that I was reading then who were finding justifications to back the McCarthy/Dulles/Rusk/McNamara/Haig/Rumsfeld/Cheney/Bush war in Iraq...

...but I digress. I just don't remember what linked me here.

Never underestimate their intelligence, always underestimate their knowledge.

Frank Delaney ~ Ireland

by siegestate (siegestate or beyondwarispeace.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:19:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was referred to ET by my son who thought I should be aware of many of the posts and diaries here about a year and a half ago.  I had expressed my concerns about the direction of the economy and my dissatisfaction with the Orange place.  I lurked as a visitor for a few months and then created my account and began commenting about 14 months ago.  Since then this site has come to occupy more and more of my time.  

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon May 25th, 2009 at 11:52:11 PM EST
i was always looking for a fun way to learn about the murky world of macroeconomics, and have been fascinated by alternative energy for decades, so when i started reading jerome's pieces at dkos, i resonated with them.

dkos opened me up to political blogging, and i still love reading there, but the scale of it is overwhelming, it lacks immediacy also because of the time difference.

so when ET formed, i heard about it from jerome's sig, came over to check it out, and here it is.

dkos' firehose is one of the reasons you won't find me amid the growth-pumpers here. i like a peaceful neighbourhood, where you get to know people, and that gets swirled away so easily as popularity grows. what's the point of a decent diary if it's swamped and buried by 500 more that are less than essential?

nationality wise, i'm half italian, half brit, and (n)ever the twain shall meet...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:16:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was around the left-leaning US blogosphere quite a bit, mostly as a lurker but increasingly a commenter, in 2003-5. On some blog, I don't recall which one, I read a piece about the rise of leftwing blogging thanks to community sites using Scoop software. That interested me because I found, and still do, the list-of-comments style blog conducive to one-off comments and only occasional hard-to-follow discussion.

That piece linked to a post by Chris Bowers on MYDD that cited Booman Tribune as a new Scoop site. I went there and saw European Tribune on the front page, clicked, and found myself here. The idea of a left-leaning European community blog felt spot-on to me, and I signed up immediately. ET had been officially up for two days.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:00:04 AM EST
Ha, compared to you I am an oldie. I signed up on the first day. :-)

I was reading dkos and most of all Billmon's site where I also dared to comment for the first time. That's were I met Jérôme and later also on dKos and Booman, so it was no question to sign up with ET when he announced it.

by Fran on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:33:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
An oldie? You, Fran? ;)

In those two days, more than 500 people signed up before I did.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 03:22:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was first exposed to a Finnish text-only system called Telmo around 1991 when I was asked to do some marketing research on it - and they supplied me with my first modem. That got me interested in the first IRC-type programs and eventually to a US site called Talker in 92-3, where I made my first contact with protoblogging and Yanks with keyboards. I think there were roughly one million websites at the time ;-)

About '93 the Finnish state Telecom asked a group of us to supply content for the first Finnish HTML site as a demo, and I was involved in a lot of conversations with engineers that awakened my interest in the social implications of bottom-up connectivity. I've been tracking developments in this area ever since. Dkos turned up on my radar in 2002/3 and then Booman Tribune where I was a regular poster (and even invented 'Froggy Bottom'). That's where I heard about Jérôme and followed efforts to set up a European version.

I have moved politically leftward ever since ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:46:59 AM EST
It's funny: I knew atrios/Eschaton, Steve Gilliard, Billmon, Talking Points Memo, and a couple of the other mainstays of the kind-of-leftie anti-Iraq-war US Blogosphere; but I don't even remember if I saw dKos before ET.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:42:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I first found out about DKos because Juan Cole mentioned it in relation with a controversy he was involved with. I followed the link and couldn't figure out what that site was all about. This must have been in 2003-4.

Then in the aftermath of Katrina DKos became the single best place to get information and commentary on what was going on. During the month of September 2005 I hung out at DKos, and one day I caught Jerome's signature and here I am.

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:46:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, and before blogging I used to read news scavengers such as CommonDreams, alternative newsletters such as CounterPunch and blogs such as Juan Cole's, or Stan Goff's Feral Scholar.

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:27:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, Juan Cole is a kind of Strange Attractor in all this. My first introduction to Cole was via a Finnish chat room called 'Kinky Bar' which at that time was full of soft-intellectual malcontents, rather than the genuinely kinky (although an engineering Professor from the Tech University was into both). So it was more Chomsky than Choke-collars. I still have RW friends from that period.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:22:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sven Triloqvist:
Juan Cole is a kind of Strange Attractor in all this
Juan Cole was one of the first academics to have a prominent blog, and his insight was very valuable in making sense of what was going on in Iraq.

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:32:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Was dkos really 2002/2003? I'd have thought early 2004 at least.

I was on kuro5hin during the Iraq war brawling days, before it turned into a cesspit of trolling. I left about the time that rusty became an admin for dkos during the American election campaign.

--
$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$

by martingale on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:24:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I can't be sure, but DKos was certainly founded in 2002 (via Wikip). Certainly not as late as 2004.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:27:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I stand corrected.

--
$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$
by martingale on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 09:37:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
http://www.dailykos.net/archives/000001.html

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 04:10:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Between 9/11 and the outbreak of the Iraq War, I simultaneously began to drift off the USENET newsgroups I frequented then (mainly talk.origins and alt.atheism; you could talk about everything in the latter freely until the flame wars started between pro-war libertarian Americans and war-sceptic liberal Americans and non-Americans), and traditional media as a news source. This led me first, for a few hot months in 2003, to the web forums of some newspapers, above all Guardian On-Line. There, articles from the anti-war US Libertarian site AntiWar.com were quoted or linked to frequently, so that became my daily read.

AntiWar.com linked to blog posts frequently, that's how I discovered the Blogosphere. Through the anti-war connection (the anti-war libertarians had no qualms about linking even to commies like Lenin's Tomb), I found blogs closer to my political preferences.

So, one I stuck with was Billmon's The Whiskey Bar. When Billmon pulled the plug on comments, The Moon of Alabama was founded, so I looked in some times.

Meanwhile, I was searching for a blog discussing matters beyond the Anglo world, one for European and EU issues. Via some leftist blogs, I found A Fistful of Euros. That blog has a decent coverage of Europe and a civil tone, but I found most writers too uncritical of the economic consensus, and felt as if most writers are US or British expats with decidedly standard Anglo views. [I must stress I don't know how true my perceptions have been, and may well have been well off; for example one expat whose views of the host country seemed clearly upper-class English to me turned out to be Irish.]

So, it was on these two blogs that I saw links to ET in few months after it was founded. The need for registration and the dominance of economic issues kept me off at first, but eventually I registered -- and the rest is history.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:35:40 AM EST
the anti-war libertarians had no qualms about linking even to commies like Lenin's Tomb

Oh, and myself, who decided around the same time that neoliberalism became too intolerable to stay in the cozy waters of social liberalism and that Marxist class-war rhetoric suddenly made sense, had no qualms about reading stuff by these rightists.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:51:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If we're going back to Usenet, I was hacking ARPANET at uni in the early 80s (some of those passwords were way too easy to guess) and then heard about this newfangled thing called the Internet in the early 90s.

I was already on a local BBS by then. The level of conversation was not high, but I did meet some eccentric people.

The Internet arrived, via the incredibly unprofessional Demon ISP, as was, in 1994. I found USENET - I remember grinning disturbingly as I watched the complete list of newsgroups downloading - but with a handful of exceptions USENET mostly seemed full of noise, flamefests and disturbed people.

The web arrived not long after. I was writing magazine features telling people they'd soon (for very approximate values of soon) be able to chat around the world and download music and videos without having to buy them on disk.

This was 1994. Not much happened, blog wise, for about a decade, apart from an embarrassing stint on some of the wackier communities on AOL, which I'd rather forget.

I was almost completely apoliticial until the Bush election. I had the usual middle class very vague leftish sympathies, but that was about as far as it went. Politics and economics weren't something I spent a lot of time on.

Then after Bush I spent some time on a Situationist mailing list, out of curiosity. Which is where I was when 9/11 happened, and which made me more aware that politically, things were not as they should be.

In 2005, while watching the Katrin coverage, I found dKos, which impressed me with high quality writing and first hand accounts of what was happening. Somehow that led to ET. I looked at it briefly, thought it seemed rather dull, and then forgot it.

I came back a few months later for another look, and it seemed more interesting.

And here we are.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 08:10:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Damned oldtimer! In the early 80s, I was in diapers and playing REVERSI on my PET 2001. But I never had much time for USENET in 1994, although I remember being amazed when our BOFH at uni showed us the Vatican website on Mosaic...



--
$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$

by martingale on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 08:33:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Back in the early -- well, not early, middle -- eighties, I fried my father's first computer, a ZX81, by managing to connect the 220V supply to a 12V socket. (ZX81: clockrate 3.25MHz, 8kB ROM, 1kB RAM... unbelievable.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:14:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
and you've been burnin' up the internet ever since with your high voltage prose...:-)

notes from no w here
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:42:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's impressive! I've managed to connect U.S. appliances to European sockets (there goes the toaster oven...), but to 12V seems more of a challenge...
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 12:42:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I had a ZX81.  The extension pack to expand it to a dizzying 16kb RAM cost almost as much as the original machine, and you had to plug it into a TV  :)
by Sassafras on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:00:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I remember in the early to mid eighties, my employer brought a couple of hard drives for me to fit into a PC clone for testing. £1500 for each 40Mb drive.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:07:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The place where I also learned the valuable life lesson, never shout at the woman who's sleeping with the boss. It's just not good for job longevity.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:09:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's even worse for job longevity if you shout at her while she's doing it...

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson
by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:33:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
were you the boss?

notes from no w here
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 05:30:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
HOW TO ORDER AN IBM PERSONAL COMPUTER, Columbia University, 1984: 10 MB fixed disk drive, $1281.00; 10MB expansion unit,  $2037.00 (for XT).

The computer itself, IBM PC XT ( 28KB Memory, one 10MB drive) would have cost you $3776.00. These are academic discount prices...

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:14:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and multiply by about 3 to convert to present day dollars.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:19:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We had XTs in the office where I started work in 1989.  We used them to run Sage and Lotus 123, which we pretty much used as an addendum to the schedules created by hand.

In 1991, my mid-level firm having being swallowed by one of the Big 6, everything was computerised, including audit.  But the partners decided to buy six suitcase-sized laptops to be shared between around 200 people. We had to work by hand during the day, then do shifts in the evening, copying our work onto the laptops, each machine visiting as many as three people's homes in a single night. And we couldn't do much about it, because it was 1991 and so many of our other colleagues had already lost their jobs.

I did find it entertaining, though, that I was expected to audit our clients' computer systems for security when every computer the partnership owned had the same (obvious) logon and password.  When one of the precious portables went missing, the assumption was that someone had tired of the house-to-house late shifts and decided to keep one for their exclusive use. The memos became ever more threatening, culminating in the statement that all the portables had an internal log and that Computer Services Would Know Who Had Been Using It. Um...not without a secret inbuilt retinal scanner, they wouldn't...

by Sassafras on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 03:00:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I do remember paying 1000 French Francs for a 1 Mb RAM extension for a Mac II, and was even happy to find two of them...!

In those time I preferred the Sharp PC 1500 to the ZX 81 variants, as it had a nice (but very small) plotter with 4 colored pens ! (I still have it somewhere with the first portable Mac, a very heavy folding SE)...

"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:22:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh my. So cheap in those days.

I was selling a pre-MS/DOS CP/M system in '82. Saw my first 5 Megabyte hard disk that we sold for 10K...or was it a 10 Meg for 5K? Anyway, it was a lot for a little.


Never underestimate their intelligence, always underestimate their knowledge.

Frank Delaney ~ Ireland

by siegestate (siegestate or beyondwarispeace.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:44:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Did you always remember to mount a scratch monkey?

:-)

In 1979 a couple of us put a Pertec fixed hard drive onto an Apple.  One whole meg!  (Gah-zang! Gosh, boy-oh-boy.)  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:22:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yes but you couldn't play frisbee with them unlike 8" single sided floppies.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 11:33:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
... a Timex Sinclair ... first totally closet compatible computing device I ever owned.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:19:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The first computer to which I had personal access was a Motorola Exorciser 6800 program development special purpose computer, with two 8" floppy drives, and, I think, 128kb of ram and a centronics dot matrix printer.  This was in 1978 and the system was purchased for the purpose of developing an editing system for the 3M Digital Audio Mastering System.

The software was primarily designed for 6800 assembly language program development but also included a line editor which could be used as a primitive word processor.  I went off to a one week Exorciser School that was more intense than anything I had experienced since college.  Fortunately, I had the budget to hire experienced programmers who worked "second shift" to develop the required systems.  It was a pretty cool system for the time.

The first p.c. that I owned was an Apple II with dual 3.5" floppies and, I think, 128 Kb of memory.  This was '79 or '80.  It had a slightly better word processor and, of course, commercially available software.  The constraints of being the primary breadwinner for a family of 3 in L.A. meant that I kept that machine almost 10 years.  But I wrote the seismic analysis that became the California State PTA's official position paper on that machine and my son learned to type with blazing speed and we all learned to enjoy computer games on it.  

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 09:24:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
afew sat me in front of his computer and introduced me to ET.  I've never blogged anywhere else before or since.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:05:22 AM EST
So basically you're the first cybernun - Bride of ET ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:30:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"I've never blogged anywhere else before or since."

Out of curiostity, why not?  

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 11:35:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It never especially occurred to me to go on any blogs before.  I'd been in chat rooms and forums and got bored incredibly quickly and didn't bother going back.  I had no desire to get caught up in the trolling and insults on comments sections of newspaper websites.

As for now, ET takes up enough of my time without getting sucked into blogging elsewhere too.  I have been asked to blog on a Welsh site which I'd happily do except I'd have to be much more careful about how I comment since I'd risk my personal view being mistaken for the view of my organisation.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 03:32:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I started discovering the leftie blogosphere in 2003-2004, and ended up on DKos just before the pie wars. I followed the various break-out blogs and, well, here I am!

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:12:32 AM EST
Pie wars? Do I want to know?

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:20:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
http://www.dkosopedia.com/wiki/Pie_fight

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:35:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am trying to remember how I first started reading blogs, but I can't. I guess I did not consider "blogs" a new cathegory at the time (still don't really), just frequently updated pages. But pulling my history as far back as I can remember, I would say there is some starting point on one hand Salam Pax (which led to Riverbend, Raed and lots of antiwarblogs) and on the other Whiskey Bar which led to Moonofalabama and then here.

There is probably some obscure blog way back that linked to both Salam Pax and Whiskey Bar.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:36:56 AM EST
While the Blogosphere is thriving, their home country is in ruins, and they left...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 06:05:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I found out about this place while hanging out with metatone in London, who I met elsewhere on the nets.

Oh and if we're going to throw our cred around I knew about dkos before all of you :)

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 06:37:51 AM EST
Well I have zero cred, because I came from the MSM.  I started blogging on Timesonline when I became ill and didn't have the energy to do anything else.. Valentin linked to Eurotrib and I came out of curiosity.  It reminded me of stundent groups I had been a member of a long time ago.  Still does!

notes from no w here
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 07:31:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I found EuroTrib via Booman, sometime within its first week online.  I think.  I was at work, looking for stuff to read, and really happy that the web filter hadn't bothered to screen out the dKos split-off sites.  I still read dKos every day, but I've not been to Booman in a long time.  I don't post anywhere else, though.
by Zwackus on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 07:38:54 AM EST
You signed up on ET's second day online, (21 hours before I did).
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 11:50:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I found ET while googling for stuff about the French nuclear program, and found Jerome's brilliant text at DKos about it.

Then I read through all his previous energy-related diaries at DKos, and I found out so very much about natural gas and pipelines which I had no idea of before that.

And then I found a link from DKos here. :)

   

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 07:50:14 AM EST
For those of you who haven't seen it yet, I give you... the best commercial in the world!



Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 08:00:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
isn't that an almost copy of a pop video?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 08:10:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The music is from a pop song, "Funkytown", and the visuals were done by the H5 bureau. If I recall correctly, they used the same method, cell shading for the music video "Röyksopp - Remind Me".

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 08:23:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
im a bit dubious about industrial organisations 'borrowing' the coolness of youth culture. it's a bit of a dubious approach, makes you look like the childcatchers cart in chitty chitty bang bang.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 08:36:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well I wanted to understand the US elections from an American point of view, see what was happening without a BBC filter (Or CNN of Fox having satelite tv), and wound up in 2004 on the big orange place. at some point there I decided to look at the list of names of other sites down the side and ended up here.

before that I'd been banging around on a variety of networks and sites (dating all the way back toa network of 8k commodore pets that I used to maintain)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 09:02:31 AM EST
I think I came here by following a post by Jerome a Paris on DKos. I was there trying to understand the drift I feel between here and there !

I'm not so keen on forums as I don't have the hard science expertise that often goes with economics, nor the time to indulge in writing seriously (in a few years, I'll do it :-) ).
 I like it here... I mean when there's no endless arguing... It reminds me of  a cultural café (without the wine and the smoke, alas! (wink to Jerome)).

I miss posting in In Wales' Photo blog (but do look every saturday). I've had a very long year of personal problems and not yet in the mood to start a serie (as I promised once) on cities and their evolution in the future (Grand Paris ou Paris Métropole ?).

Er... I'm french, have traveled, and manage to speak english when the gear kicks in (not always though)! Oh... And I just like those three periods as ellipses for a never achieved thought (or an alternative one)!

"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 09:34:20 AM EST
hello margouillat, i am sorry to hear you have had a difficult year.  but i am very glad to find you here.  i remember with fondness your diary The drifting of the "City"....

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.
by marco on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 09:47:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hi marco, thank you for the "fondness" part! You started all those nice replies with real good questions :-)

But all of you have raised the stakes so high that now I must work the next part thoroughly ( instead of my usual bed-time story telling !). Aaargh!

"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:07:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorry to hear about your problems, margouillat, but it's good to see a comment from you!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 11:51:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Never got online much in the 1980's ... I grew up in the countryside east of Columbus, so there was not a free bulletin board in local calling distance, and I didn't have the steady income to pay for one of the commercial ones.

However, when I got to grad school in the early 90's, I got involved in pkt (Post Keynesian Thought), ecol-econ (ecological economics), (& etc), mailing lists at Communications for a Sustainable Future, back before the WWW had pictures.

When my graduate assistanceship ran out and I got a job for a semester at the main local two-year community and technical college in Knoxville, there was a terminal to its minicomputer to be used to write up test papers on WordPerfect (for VAX) and such. It had gopher and ftp and email, so I spent a lot more time on the net.

When I went to Oz, I remained active, but of course the academic listservs tended to go downhill after the hoi polloi started wandering around the place.

In the early primary season before the 2004 elections, I started exploring places for information about America politics, since Gore was no longer in the running, and ended up commenting a bit on a blog dedicated to the candidate I was supporting. So early in 2006, I started blogging at my candidate's community blog. That led to Agent Orange and then here, either directly via some diary posted there, or via Booman Tribune, I don't recall which.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:31:22 AM EST
Iraq war started...I was fuming ...I was about to brake my TV not being able to follow totally biased Australian news coverage. I even started fight on one of photography sites where I posted some anti-war photos." Patriotic" Americans were ready to crucify me and they wanted me out of the site. Never mind that they posted endless photos of American flag on every bloody place in USA. Some of them told me to find political site to talk about war. I googled in desperation to find ANYBODY who would help me preserve sanity and I was very happy when I found Dkos.It was really oasis in wildness at that time. Later Dkos became too overcrowded for my taste and also Marcos openly became D. party "paper".
I followed Billmon from Dkos to Whiskey Bar. He was a great writer and people commenting on the blog were fantastic. I wasn't very happy when he decided to close comments and later closed the whole blog. I am grateful to Bernard for Moon of Alabama (after ET it's the only site that I open on a daily bases). I am not sure where on those sites I saw Jerome's announcement that he started ET and I followed. Because I admired Jerome's writing all the time and because even if I do not live in Europe I am still European and am interested in grater details what's going on in Europe.
Having spent most of my life in socialist/communist country I did not consider my self as a leftist (bad memories I suppose) but reading ET actually brought me to the sense that I am leftist in the end cause I agree with most of your views...I am just not that much on the left...    
Otherwise I think you all now by now that I am Serbian woman living in Australia for a long time now...

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind...Albert Einstein
by vbo on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:38:02 AM EST
I started at Daily Kos back in 2002, posted my first comments in 2003, and found Jerome's writing in either 2004 or 2005 (it all sort of bleeds together these days). I've always had an interest in European politics and particularly in building a cross-Atlantic movement to challenge the neoliberal policies that plague both North America and Europe.

So when Jerome founded this place I quickly came over to visit. For a long time I lurked, and I still do - I read the site daily - but eventually I started adding my own comments.

My favorite diaries are those that are either about European politics, those that challenge the economic consensus, and DoDo's train blogging.

I am pretty busy with my own blogs - Calitics, California High Speed Rail Blog, and my place of employment, Courage Campaign, where we're trying to fix California, a state that is so broken it is beginning to remind me of Weimar.

If I had more insight on European matters I'd write more diaries. My wife and I are taking a trip to Portugal next month and I'll definitely write up my impressions, but 2 weeks will only allow me to get a surface view that may not be all that informed.

Should produce pretty pictures though!

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 11:33:31 AM EST
I was actually introduced to blogs by my friend over at the WSJ, who pointed me to Andrew Sullivan's daily dish, in the run up to the Iraq war (probably February 2003 or so). Following the blogroll and looking around, I started by reading lots of blogs from both sides of the aisle. I posted my first comments on Calpundit (Kevin Drum, who later blogged at Political Animal and now at Mother Jones), as he wrote quite a bit about energy and I was annoyed by some of the simplistic comments that came up (probably the "we invaded Afghanistan to build the pipeline" story got me to write first!). Then, like quite a few of the regulars here, I joined the comments at billmon's whiskey bar and got involved in the efforts to create a substitute place when the comments were closed down over there - I posted a Moon of Alabama with Bernhard for a while, did a few things with SusanG before she got famous with the Gannon story, and at some point started crossposting things on dKos. In 2005, I started writing very actively for dKos (and, then MoA) and Booman invited me to be a FPer on BT, where we set out to work on the mirror site, ET, which started with SoJ (still posting on BT) and Sirocco. I also got invited to blog in the Oil Drum team at some point in 2006.

Since starting ET, I must admit that I read almost no blog these days outside of dKos and ET (I actually participate very little to the discussions on TOD, unless on my stories) - which may explain why we (I, anyway) do so little crossreferencing with other blogs, something I regret but can't help - there's only so many hour in a day.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 12:39:40 PM EST
he wrote quite a bit about energy and I was annoyed by some of the simplistic comments that came up (probably the "we invaded Afghanistan to build the pipeline" story got me to write first!)

Methinks you were naive about the reality sense of the neocons back then...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 01:00:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
these were commenters of the left too happy to see oil pretexts behind everything.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 01:03:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's not what I mean. I too don't think that oil was the prime motivation behind the Afghanistan invasion. But you dismissed the story entirely on the basis of its lack of economic (and political) reality, if I remember correctly (itr has been a few years since this came up last) -- while there were people pursung it in high-level talks, just like others still pursue the Nabucco fata morgana today.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 01:43:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
With a quick search in the ET archives, I only found this -- only problem, the sceptic in the discussion is redstar not you. Nevertheless, there is a priceless quote from a Clinton admin official posted by Montereyan.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 01:57:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I started well away from the political blogosphere at a bellydance discussion site called bhuz back in 2000/1. Amongst all of the general discussion about dance history, what's good dancing, what's bad (BIG issue in BD) there were occasional threads about politics (it was around 9/11) and I found myself finding out about the diverse opinions available in the US and butting heads with a lot of it. After all, even republicans and libertarians bellydance.

Sometime in early 2004 one of them mentions she reads dKos so I go over to see what's what and I was hooked immediately. It was so positive and energised at a time when politics looked pretty awful with the Bush- Blair-Berlu axis of weevils.

After a while I started punting around for a european version, initially finding a rival to ET started by some guy called "Welshman" and I posted there a few times, but it never generated any traffic. I despaired of the insular pettiness fo the UK blogs and then discovered ET. Started reading in Dec 2005 and joined in March-ish 2006, in time for the first Paris meetup.

One day I aspire to knowing what I'm talking about, but I've yet to really begin charting the immensity of my ignorance.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 01:31:22 PM EST
Congratulations, you've just graduated :)

Undergraduate: someone who thinks they know everything.
Postgraduate: someone who realizes they know nothing.
Postdoc: someone who realizes that no one else knows anything either.


--
$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$

by martingale on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 09:34:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think we've all dropped a pebble into the well of our own ignorance. Anyone who's heard it hit the bottom has an overactive imagination.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:05:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In 1989, I was building a computer model of molecules in liquid, and I needed a letter from my thesis supervisor to go to the university library and have a librarian input a search for related papers.  This vaguely expressed computer link to other universities thing didn't even have a name, as far as I remember. The search took four and a half hours to run, and produced nothing at all.

I first used the internet, and sent my first email, via a laptop the size of a briefcase, in 1996, when I was living in Australia.  But it was incredibly slow (and expensive, because you still paid by the minute) and almost nobody else I knew had email anyway. Make that nobody. A single family where we kept in touch via the husbands' work email addresses.

But it looked cool, and it looked like the future, and, returning to the UK in 1997, I had a computer (with a fast processor and state-of-the-art 56kbps modem) and second phone line before I had a sofa.  Heavily pregnant, with a toddler, and having left my mums-based social network on the other side of the world, I found the chatrooms on a site called ivillage. It was the international mumsnet of its day, and the fantastic thing about it for me was that, no matter what time you were up, sleepless after dealing with the baby, there was always somebody to talk to.  Alongside that, I discovered icq, which seemed, at that early stage, to be the favoured distraction of postdoc researchers locked in a cellar with an autoclave.

I found Eurotrib via TBG, who I met via an online forum.  He made a couple of references to this site, and I looked in, but it..well...it looked a bit over my head, actually.  But the rest of the net was becoming frustratingly diluted with inanity and trolling and I kept coming back and eventually delurked...and if it's really obvious I'm out of my league, at least people have been kind enough not to say so... ;)

by Sassafras on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 01:42:08 PM EST
Hey, don't knock 56 kb/s modems. That's better connection than I had for most of the week before last...

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 03:01:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's probably better than I get now when I'm competing for bandwidth with two computers and a Wii...
by Sassafras on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 03:26:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
56K?

I remember the leap from 300bit to 1200bit per second acoustic couplers, that just seemed so fast!

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 03:43:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Then the bastards came up with 2400, and then the built in serial port on the Commodore 64 started falling behind, despite have 64 kilobits of RAM and a blazing 1Mhz 6502 processor. And when someone came out with the 192Kbps serial cartridge, I couldn't afford that damn thing. Bastards.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:26:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
... 64 kilobits would be 8K, 4 times the Timex Sinclair 1000 (rebadged ZX-81) in my closet.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:28:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
300 baud. On tape cassette.

And we were grateful.

Well - almost.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 06:28:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, I had the 16KB RAM expansion. It would make the computer crash at random intervals. The BASIC interpreter ran in the cycles that were not used to generate the display.

As I said, the most closet compatible computer I have ever had.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 06:54:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was in this class on nationalism in college, and the first day, the prof asked everyone to tell the class where they were from.  It turned into a truly fascinating exercise when he refused to clarify the question for anyone...

I first learned of the existence of blogs, and began posting comments on Blog for America, blog of Dean for America.  When Dean lost the nomination, I begrudgingly began reading, posting comments at Daily Kos, because that is where all the action was, and because getting Bush out was more important to me than my opinion Dkos.  So it was always about organizing for me.  Then I found ET, through Jerome on Dkos, I think.  Or Booman.  Or some combination of the two.  Came to put my faith in Europe after watching America drop the moral high ground ball.  Stuck around and ended up writing perverse diaries and being encouraged to continue that madness by the sickos here.  I largely stopped writing those diaries, for a number of reasons.  But I come back for the intellectual debates and the sociological freak show and because to be honest, no one else is interested in my demented obsession with Russia and its male inhabitants.  

It may be a train wreck.  It may be full of Phd level esoterica.  It may be doomed.  I don't know.  It's often very interesting, though.  It's the closest thing I've found to one of those salons back in ye olden days, where egomaniacs and romantics would hang out and argue and debate and discuss VERY IMPORTANT CONCEPTS and indulge in hedonism.  I'm sure those were highly dysfunctional environments as well.  

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky

by poemless on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:33:25 PM EST
no one else is interested in my demented obsession with Russia and its male inhabitants.

And when is the next edition of your obsession to appear?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 03:45:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't hold your breath.  

"Talking nonsense is the sole privilege mankind possesses over the other organisms." -Dostoevsky
by poemless on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 03:53:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It may be a train wreck.  It may be full of Phd level esoterica.  It may be doomed.  I don't know.  It's often very interesting, though.  It's the closest thing I've found to one of those salons back in ye olden days, where egomaniacs and romantics would hang out and argue and debate and discuss VERY IMPORTANT CONCEPTS and indulge in hedonism.  I'm sure those were highly dysfunctional environments as well.  

and the best thing about meetups is is we get to do all that with beer, wine and Caol Ila.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 03:47:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sometime in the mid-70s messed around with a telephonic file exchange system (at a whopping 75 baudot ... ka-chunk, ka-chunk) on an IBM 360 installation whose Chief Computer Operator was a close friend.  Got excited and brought-up a CBBS system sometime 'round 78/79.  Ran that for a while and then migrated over to USENET back when it was still useful for something.  

Wrote a user Help Desk sometime in the early 80s.  Never went totally live as the company collapsed about 2 weeks after Alpha Release.

Went over to the Internet sometime 'round 95, mostly as a news and information source.

Got involved with Kerry campaign in '03 which led me to dKos (and some French dude's diaries) & the Center-Left blog-o-sphere which led me to BooTrib which led me to ET.  

tra-la


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 02:52:05 PM EST
I came over from BooMan where I knew Izzy.  I came because Izzy was blogging the winter olympics (ice skating) as I recall.

I stayed because I love to read the conversations that go on in the comments although I seldom participate.  You all educate me in ways that American blogs don't.

by Maryb2004 on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 04:39:45 PM EST
I came here from dkos where I really appreciated Jerome's posts.  I really came  back, though, for all the other stuff-especially the photography essays and the train stuff.  The hard part is seeing the many good examples that Europe has to share, and comparing them with our lamentable lack of progress.

"I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man...'" Robbie Robertson
by NearlyNormal on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:09:04 PM EST
Well, I suppose I should feel honored that a comment of mine prompted you to start this discussion, but I'm mostly reassured: I'm not alone asking myself these kind of questions :)

As for me, like afew, I started to follow the left US blogosphere since my return from California (TPM, Atrios, Steve Gilliard, ...) and I'm not sure how I did eventually stumbled upon here; most likely, from a link at DKOS, probably from Jerome: after all, what's more natural than a French guy reading a fellow French on a USian blog? Happens all the time... After some lurking, I did eventually roll up my sleeves and started commenting...

by Bernard (bernard) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:11:38 PM EST
Well, I suppose I should feel honored that a comment of mine prompted you to start this discussion, but I'm mostly reassured: I'm not alone asking myself these kind of questions :)

Well, it's not pure, undiluted searching for the truth... I wanted to test my hypothesis that people migrate through links provided by other people at other network nodes.

That we draw from Booman and Kos isn't terribly surprising, of course, but the way we got a whole migration from Timesonline is interesting, because it suggests that the Booman/Kos umbilical chord is not unique, and that it's possible to recruit new talent from other fora if you have an integral presence there.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 05:27:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There's probably a nice PhD project in there somewhere.

If we're allowed to do that on here. :)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 06:05:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In that case you'll have to put me down in the outlier column :) I'm one of the few who don't read dkos and never have. I like ET because of its high signal to noise ratio, but my main interests tend to be technical/science related, not so much political, and I usually goof around foremost on slashdot, and have been doing so for probably 10 years.

It's unlikely that I would have ever started reading ET if it didn't run on Scoop. I can't stand the linear discussion forums that litter the web, and much prefer tree-ordered comment structures. Another requirement is that it has to run well enough on my web browser of choice: w3m. I think I found ET more or less randomly over time TBH.

--
$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$

by martingale on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 09:20:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In all the comments and dewyclarations and baudy remembrances, there's not one cite, not one graph, not one photo.

Unless you can back it up, I disagree with all of you.

(insert big grinning smiley here.)

As you all know in your brain of hearts, you were all led here by a symphonic cascading synchronicity of coincidences, powered by gravitational waves spinning out of a double star conjunct with Mercury in the seventh house of Gog and Magogg, across the standard gauge tracks from a run-down Abbey overlooking Rennes-Le-Chateau, where string theory was first being used to develop corrosive derivative obligations.

And now that we have you...

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 07:00:30 PM EST


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 10:32:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A clear case of over inhalation of paint fumes, partially absorbed through the socks.  But nice color and format, if the data is a bit ragged.  ;-)

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 03:03:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm an American and a monoglot, but not for lack of desire. I've studied 3 years of German in high school, 3 years of Danish at university, and 1 year of French after graduating many years ago. I talked myself out of going to Denmark to continue my Danish studies. I've often dreamed about moving to Europe, but cowardice, family ties, and lack of a job have kept me in the States.

I've have only been able to enjoy Europe first hand twice in my life, but liked both of my trips. I was in England for the month of March 1998 and in Germany for the month of November 2002. Now with the strong euro and weak dollar combo, I've not been able to afford any more European visits. Maybe one day. :)

I joined ET when kos made a special rule. I came in solidarity with Jerome. I was attracted to his writing because I feel, he was one of the few people writing there at the time that kept moving the discussion to the left.

I post comments when I can and cross-post essays from Docudharma and Daily Kos that I think may be of interest to the ET readership. I do try to write Euro-content™, but not as often as I'd like.

In jest (I think), Migeru created the †Magnifico Alert† for things I post, but I've not used it much lately.

by Magnifico on Tue May 26th, 2009 at 08:27:15 PM EST
I've spent a big part of my youth online, first on BBS systems, then from about 1992 on Usenet and then after Usenet became pretty much the cesspool it is now, on blogs and discussion boards. Usenet still holds a place in my heart: I'm one of the three coordinators of the Finnish main Usenet hierarchy (sfnet), in my previous career I also administered Usenet news servers, I met my husband and many of my friends via Usenet, and I still like the decentralized system much more than blogs or discussion boards. I just don't spend much time there anymore since it's become so hard to find the actual discussions in the middle of all the craziness.

Here I think I found my way through either dKos or Booman Tribune, don't remember which. I still read those both sites from time to time but especially dKos is nowadays pretty uninteresting to me. I don't think I've logged in or commented in years, or at least months.

You have a normal feeling for a moment, then it passes. --More--

by tzt (tzt) on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 09:42:45 AM EST
Hmm, hmm...where did I start in the blog world, anyway, Certainly it was post-9/11 and around the time of Bush's war - looking for some information, conversation and community. Darn, can't recall now...now I have to try and remember. But I did get very into Daily Kos quite early on, at least 2003, maybe late 2002...and there I started reading Jerome's articles, which led me to Booman, and then here when ET started. And since I also had just moved to Europe, ET was great for helping me feel a connection here with people, to start to "integrate" here...(am I integrated yet??)...and the first meetup in Paris really solidified that experience. And each ensuing meetup I have attended. Actually, I know more people in "Europe" because of ET than I do living in Switzerland. Strange that...so its not "just" an online community to me - its real people who have become friends! Very cool!!

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Thu May 28th, 2009 at 01:50:38 PM EST
am I integrated yet??

(Everyone go see Am I Integrated Yet? by whataboutbob, from 15 February 2007.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri May 29th, 2009 at 01:35:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have just followed DoDo's advice and read your absolutely beautiful "integration" diary (all of it).

Did you go to Africa?

by Lily (put - lilyalmond - here <a> yahaah.france) on Sat May 30th, 2009 at 03:15:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, in fact I have some diaries on a few of those trips (Tanzania & Kenya)

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Tue Jun 2nd, 2009 at 09:54:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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