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Vote Match EU 2009

by pereulok Wed May 27th, 2009 at 04:48:27 AM EST

 EUROPEAN ELECTIONS 

Through The European Magazine - Cafe Babel, I have received information of the "Vote Match" project, a dissemination project that aims at promoting European thinking in European citizens.

By answering a set of agree/disagree questions, the test establish which European Group within the European Parliament fits better with one´s own political/pan-European views.

I think it can be interesting for you all in two ways:

  1. Taking the test, and see what happens.
  2. Evaluating the test, and giving an opinion on whether the questions selected are relevant enough, there´s some issue missing, etc. etc.

I consider most of the pro European citizenship initiatives I know fairly uninteresting, but this one attracted my attention.

See test and results at Vote Match Europe 2009


Display:
Unsurprisingly, I scored Greens followed by PES followed by European Left/Nordic Greens.

Some of the questions seemed a bit woolly.

I've added our European Elections logo to your diary, pereulok. I hope you don't mind.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 05:59:21 AM EST
"I've added our European Elections logo to your diary, pereulok. I hope you don't mind. "

I don´t mind, of course.

"If you don't want a man unhappy politically, don't give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none." (Fahrenheit 451)

by pereulok on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 06:58:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I first got: Greens, then GUE/NGL, then PES. Then I hit back, and my results were lost, I re-did it... and GUE/NGL came out ahead of Greens.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 08:34:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My second test-taking was the 147th on the site. Party breakdown:

ALDE    16
EPP    15
GUE/NGL    16
ID    4
PES    33
Verts/ALE    63

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 08:36:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Given this result, it worries me that 53% of test-takers would disagree with a ban on the transport of live animals (one of the uglier sides of Transalpine traffic in particular). Also that 54% don't understand/approve of parliamentarism/or can't even distinguish Commission and Council, and want a directly elected Commission President.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 08:40:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I felt that question needed a reminder that it was Commission President at issue, not the vaguely-understood Lisbon new Council President.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 08:45:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, my view is clear, I think, in my other post. The problem with European issues is that many of them would need a reminder... I passed the test to my mother, which I really consider an informed person, and I was surprised about the issues not related with EU procedires but with EU policies and recent debates that were new to her, or just did saw the point of treating them at European level.

I know this is a sociological fallacy example, but anyway...

(Sociological fallacy "fast" definition=taking one´s own experiences as representative and/or explicative of sociological trends)

"If you don't want a man unhappy politically, don't give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none." (Fahrenheit 451)

by pereulok on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 01:30:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, what would you suggest? Leave the uninformed voters out? That was one of the two main theoretical reasons why vote was related to a minimal income in the 19th Century (considering that in general property=education, on the one side, and that it you don´t have property shouldn´t be deciding on othr people's property, on the other).

I´m exagerating, I know you don´t mean that, but...

I mean, let´s be fair, European Union has a very deep citizenship problem, with most of the Europeans uninformed AND uninterested. Democratization of institutions must be done taking into account this situation, that in fact helps options 1) based in demagogic discourses easy to understand and feel; 2) with very good marketing campaign; and 3) based in national -NOT European- issues [Spain example, agree or not with Zapatero anticrisis plan]

What EU can do is:

  1. Try to be democratic but, wit resoect of the development of European political culture, not expecting too much in few time.
  2. Promote European political culture. HOWEVER: EU political system (if you can consider it so, I still don´t) is being built in a sociopolitical context of general desinterest about politics. Don´t expect citizens that don´t believe in "sound", "long-lasting" political systems to be emotionally and even rationally involved in a political system (the European) that copy liberal democracy schemes, just in a bigger scope and with more complicated procedures. EU system isn´t nowadays something in which development you can see the way out of the crisis of liberal democracy.


"If you don't want a man unhappy politically, don't give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none." (Fahrenheit 451)
by pereulok on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 01:23:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, what would you suggest? Leave the uninformed voters out?

I'm not suggesting anything, I'm just worried by the prevalence of such views even in an apparently Green-tilted sample.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 01:42:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
..where I note that one that

  1. I didn't have a (big) problem with the majority views on the other 23 questions,

  2. regarding the second of the two worrying me, I am very much aware that Presidentism/royalism (as a popular personification of politics) is popular in the general populace of almost every democratic unit, whether they actually have it or have something else (i.e. parliament-based PM and/or direct democracy).


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 01:47:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, transport of animals across borders is kind of a wooly issue. In Denmark, you can barely go two hundred km without hitting a border, after all, while in Germany or France, you can go a thousand km or more and never see one.

A cap on the duration of transport of live animals (and regulation of the ways they are transported) would make more sense.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Thu May 28th, 2009 at 06:26:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How does this compare with the questionnaire we discussed in the diary An Electoral Compass for the European Elections by nanne (April 23rd, 2009)?

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 06:19:45 AM EST
"How does this compare with the questionnaire we discussed in the diary An Electoral Compass for the European Elections by nanne (April 23rd, 2009)?"

Quite similar, both in questions and results. In fact, maybe the same reserach teams are involved in both... Dunno.

"If you don't want a man unhappy politically, don't give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none." (Fahrenheit 451)

by pereulok on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 07:07:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I missed that one while my equipment was down. Have just done it.

I think EUProfiler is fuller in terms of questions and subsidiaries. I also like the compass presentation. This is mine:


by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 08:12:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I did some research about this. It´s part of the same project, being the simplified one I saw first more oriented to European citizenship promotion; in fact, at some point a screen pops up invites you to do another test whose results will be included in some research (the one I sent is not).

"If you don't want a man unhappy politically, don't give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none." (Fahrenheit 451)
by pereulok on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 01:25:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This one is pan-European, the other one (mine) is national. In my perspective, you continue to vote for national and not European parties, but the views on that differ.
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Mon Jun 1st, 2009 at 02:38:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]

My results in the other test were here - for national parties I was closest for PSOE and ERC in Spain and LibDems in the UK.

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 at 02:08:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I sent the Romanian test to a friend that answered me back, telling me that either the test was crap, or she was to equlibrated or to skizo, as her results were pro Bacescu (no way), with a very similar percentage of agreement with the opposite party.

So, as you may consider the test very simple, but not full of mistakes, I decided to pass the Romanian one myself and then provide an answer to my friend, with the following, significative result:

Believe me, you cannot agree at the same level to all these people (my God, 50% of agreement with Romanian extreme right!).

My interpretation goes beyond the basic one (the European debate lacks deepness, so all say more or less the same). I think that Romanian political parties approaches Europe with a state-oriented agenda, as one country approaches any other international organisation in the framework of the foreign policy. Social, economical, cultural cleavages don´t divide a political action in Europe based on state reasoning. Conclusion: Romania citizenship is even less mature than the average European citizen, with electoral programmes and political acting based on "they-we" opposition.

Dunno what you think.

By the way, DoDo, in any case, I came up as Maghiar :):):)

Other national tests at: http://www.votematch.eu/

"If you don't want a man unhappy politically, don't give him two sides to a question to worry him; give him one. Better yet, give him none." (Fahrenheit 451)

by pereulok on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 01:57:00 PM EST
Here is my national test for Hungary:

The first two are actually running on a joint list, and LMP is a new Green formation -- and indeed my likely vote.

MSzP are the Socialists, backers of the current 'expert' minority government. While it's not as bad as for you with Romanian parties, I guess even this much similarity is due to the flowery nature of the party's Europolitics/rhetorics -- I don't approve of many of the government's policies.

Fidesz is the main opposition party, a right-populist outfit. In addition to the above reason, similarities may come from their social populism. (Which is balanced by their recently resurgent insane tax cut populism.)

MDF is a small conservative party with a recent neoliberal makeover.

SzDSz is the liberal party. Methinks on non-economic values, I am still more similar to them than all the other main parties, so weighting matters...

Jobbik are the neo-fascists. That similarities aren't zero must come from their social protectionism.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 02:39:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
...and the test for Germany, rather unsurprising (maybe except for the SPD coming in closer than the Pirates and Newropeans):

Grüne = Greens, Linke = Left Party, Piraten = Pirate Party. (I also wanted to choose the counterpart for Jobbik, NPD, but the neo-nazis apparently did not cooperate with the poll-makers.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed May 27th, 2009 at 02:42:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was Green, then GUE/NGL, then PES, then the Bad Guys.

Of course, it ate my responses when I pressed "back."

grumbles something about amateurs who code in javascript

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Thu May 28th, 2009 at 06:37:28 PM EST
Heh. The EU Profiler is funny. It says I'm closest to the Danish Social Liberals. As if.

Interestingly, it also claims that the Social Liberals are to the left of the Social Democrats. Which is not quite impossible, of course, but not my impression at all.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Thu May 28th, 2009 at 06:54:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The EU Profiler conflates social and economic left-right, so that they can have Europhile/sceptic as the second axis of a 2D representation. (Back when that was posted, this bugfged me most -- then again, a 3D representation would be difficult.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri May 29th, 2009 at 01:32:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There's perfectly fine 3d representation software available that is not excessively expensive for institutional users. Not that that would have mattered very much in this case - when you toggled off all the categories that weren't hardcore econ/social policy (a nice feature, by the way), the compass still showed a right-of-centre party being about as far to the left as a centre-left party...

Of course, some of it is GIGO - the party programmes of Danish parties are usually bullshit that's there to look pretty, not to describe their realpolitik (I mean, SF still has "revolutionary change" in the programme, because you can't strip it out without offending some old, tottering Trot on the back benches...). And some of it is the fact that the Overton Window has shifted so hard to the right that anybody who isn't flying high as a kite on spiked KoolAid sounds like a commie to the interviewers. And some of it is the fact that hardcore econ/social policy made up such a small part of the survey that it can't be used for any worthwhile statistics.

What always bugs me in these surveys is that there's no way to specify deal breakers. Agreement with the statement that taxes should be lowered, even at the cost of social services is a deal breaker for me. Full stop. No need to go any further. You're not in the running anymore. Still, it was an interesting exercise, and I was rather surprised by the positions of a couple of the parties...

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Fri May 29th, 2009 at 07:07:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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