Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

European Elections 2009 - last voting day open thread

by Jerome a Paris Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 07:05:31 AM EST

EUROPEAN ELECTIONS

Today is the day when the majority of EU countries are voting for the European Parliament, and the day when results will be announced. We'll have a specific results thread later today, but use this thread in the meantime to tell us about your voting experience, most recent news about the elections in your country, and any available participation data.

You can find all our earlier coverage of the European Elections at this link.

Early coverage of NL results here


Display:
was up compared to 2004, @14,81 % vs 13,65%.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 07:07:26 AM EST
Participation is apparently low in Germany, though there are few concrete numbers. In Berlin participation is apparently at 10.2% compared to 14.2% last time. But perhaps it will improve if the weather turns around.
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 08:06:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Just talked to a Wahlhelfer (canvasser?), participation is 27% in my district so far. The 45% of last time certainly won't be reached.

"If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles." Sun Tzu
by Turambar (sersguenda at hotmail com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 09:59:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
France 24 | Slight increase in French turnout amid European apathy | France 24
Mid-day exit polls suggested a slight increase in the French voter turnout for the EU parliamentary elections at 14,81% while other European states fear poor participation rates that could boost extreme right and left-wing parties.

AFP - European governments watched nervously Sunday as voters completed four days of polling in EU parliamentary elections, amid fears of low turnout and extremist gains throughout the recession-hit continent.

Europe's Super Sunday saw electors from 19 of the 27 EU nations -- including heavyweights France, Germany, Italy and Spain -- cast their ballots.

Opinion and exit polls suggested poor turnout which could favour extreme left- and right-wing parties, although not enough to upset the balance in the new 736-seat assembly.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 10:12:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How is voting organised in France, that you have such precise numbers?

Here in the UK, I voted in a church annex with three officials, one paper list, one booth and a padlocked box. It would be asy enough for individual officials to keep track, but the job of collating it all across thousands of polling stations would be immense...

by Sassafras on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 10:31:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
collating information from all the local precincts.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 10:54:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And they ask for volunteers to help them do the counting as soon as the polls close. Members of the main parties usually stay around to make sure that thinks are done properly, but everybody is welcome.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 10:55:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
is now very slightly lower than in 2004: 33,18%  vs 33,24%.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 11:50:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I can't seem to find any stats on the UK participation rate for the euro elections.  I would have thought that even though the results aren't announced until tonight, that we'd have an idea of participation.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:00:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Swedish election authority does not relelase numbers on votes given during the day either.

On the other hand participation in the advance voting has gone way up. So voting was high before the day begun.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:14:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In Hungary, at 11am, it was 13.77% -- just a shade above 2004 (13.75%). By 17h however, it was only 30.25% -- exactly 2 perentage points below 2004... so the abysmal final 38.5% will be 'underpassed'.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:19:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BTW, I voted at midday. There were five voters ahead of me (about the half of what I'm used to in national elections; in line with the fiinal turnout figures).

In the voting booth, I saw no pencil. An election worker immediately came to check. (It only fell into a corner.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 02:56:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Easy and calm day here in Spain...

1% less in Spain  than four years ago...

It is going to ba an easy night at the electoral school.

And still 40 % Spaniards may vote for a parliament who does not select a prime-minister or comission head. This hows that there are a bunch of political freaks in Spain.. almost half the population like politics no matter what.

A pleasure


I therefore claim to show, not how men think in myths, but how myths operate in men's minds without their being aware of the fact. Levi-Strauss, Claude

by kcurie on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 08:42:04 AM EST
UK voted on Thursday but results won't be through until tonight.

BBC NEWS | Wales | Hain expects 'bad' Euro results

New Welsh Secretary Peter Hain says tonight's European election results are going to be "very bad" for Welsh Labour.

Mr Hain told the BBC Wales Politics Show: "I'm not expecting any other than a very bad result tonight.

"I can't predict where we will come in the pecking order but this could be one of the worst results that Welsh Labour have faced in our recent history".

He said voters were angry with all parties over the expenses issue.

But the Neath MP said Labour were "carrying the can" because they were the party of government.

"There's no doubt that the Labour Party is in a bad place," he said.

"In Wales, we'll see that tonight in the European elections and across the United Kingdom we are not where we want to be."

At the last European election, Labour took two of Wales' four seats in the European Parliament with Plaid Cymru and the Conservatives each winning a seat.

When tonight's results are announced it is thought that Labour could be left with just one seat.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 08:57:49 AM EST
Ilta-Sanomat (in Finnish): Voting station queues grow as youth wakes up

After midday the school door (voting station) opened at a more frequent pace. Local  residents Harri Vesterinen, 35, and Suvi Pennanen, 28, had a reason for which voting is self-evident.

- Grandpa taught me that vote as long as you are able. He said that one day it might not longer be allowed, Pennanen says.

Grandfather probably fought in one of the 3 Finnish wars with the Soviet Union during WWII. (Or against the retreating Germans in Lapland)

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 09:06:37 AM EST
Our local voting place is open until 20.00, so I'll head out when the sun is off the garden.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 09:08:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here in Italy turnout has decreased 30.68% from 34%. You can see data here on the official site of our ministry.
by Tcpip on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 10:59:02 AM EST
Projection for Austria:
ÖVP 29,6 (-3,1)
SPÖ 23,7 (-9,6)
HPM 18 (+4)
FPÖ 13,4 (+7,1)
Grüne 9,5 (-3,4)
BZÖ 4,7 (+4,7)

"If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles." Sun Tzu
by Turambar (sersguenda at hotmail com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 11:25:29 AM EST
HPM?

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:17:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hans Peter Martin. I am surprised he survived, but find that Austria's 'Sun', the Kronen Zeitung supported him.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:33:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are rumours thet the BNP have won one of the northern UK seats up for grabs. If so The fact that they have managed it while Brown is in charge will give added impetus to the Brown must go campaign.

If this is true, expect mass backbench revolts in the next few days.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 11:31:58 AM EST

EU leaders face election embarrassment

European governments braced themselves for electoral embarrassment on Sunday as recession-hit voters turned to protest parties or failed to cast ballots at all in elections to the European parliament.

In what was the largest multi-national ballot in history, voters in 19 EU countries went to the polls on the fourth and final day of an election in which the bloc's eight other states had voted between Thursday and Saturday.

Governments in many countries, especially the UK, where Gordon Brown, prime minister, is struggling for his political life, were expected to be punished by voters angry and frightened at Europe's worst recession since the 1930s.



In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 11:41:53 AM EST

Brussels blog: Tony Barber

In the Czech Republic, parliament has passed Lisbon after a long political struggle but President Vaclav Klaus, who intensely dislikes the treaty, has refused to add his signature, as Czech law requires.  So, too has President Lech Kaczynski of Poland.  As long as they hold out, Lisbon cannot come into force.

Other things being equal, both men would probably find it impossible to resist the pressure to sign Lisbon, if Irish voters were to say Yes to the treaty in October.  But other things are not equal.  Klaus and Kaczynski are looking at events in London and asking themselves how long it will be before Brown's government is out of office and replaced by a Conservative government that sees eye to eye with them on Lisbon.

Given the near-certainty that the Tories will win the next election, Klaus and Kaczynski have every incentive to sit tight and not sign the treaty.  Then the Tories will come to power and hold a referendum in which British voters will (so everyone assumes) reject Lisbon.  Hey, presto!  Lisbon is well and truly dead.

This is the real nightmare of EU leaders - not the expected low turnout in the European Parliament elections.



In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 11:46:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Frustrating for me that i'm so intellectually present in European and German politics, but am unable to vote as i'm an Ausländer.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 11:47:21 AM EST
Believe me - I feel your pain.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:26:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
First projection for Germany
CDU+CSU 38,3
SPD 21,2
Grüne 11,6
FDP 10,8
Linke 7,5
Others 10,6


"If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles." Sun Tzu
by Turambar (sersguenda at hotmail com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:16:49 PM EST
Source? (And is the release legal?)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:19:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Should have checked news first.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:23:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
...so the above must be the ARD projection of 18:12; which includes 7.5% for the CSU (thus easily passing the 5% limit). ZDF projection at 18:14:

CDU+CSU 38.2
SPD 21.4
Grüne 12.0
FDP 10.6
Linke 7.1
Others 10.7

It would appear the Koch-Mehrin attendance/censorhip scandal did not hurt the liberals.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:30:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In seats 2004 -> 2009:
CDU+CSU 49 -> 42
SPD 23 -> 23
Grüne 13 -> 13
FDP 7 -> 12
Linke 7 -> 9

That's a swing of two seats from the right to the left.

"If you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles." Sun Tzu

by Turambar (sersguenda at hotmail com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 12:31:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There's now a results story up: please put data in there, there are separate headings for groups of countries!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 01:04:23 PM EST
This morning I had the most annoying experience: my vote was refused at the polling station. Apparently an EU citizen in France must register separately for the two elections we can vote in, municipal and European.

I voted previously in another commune, where I only needed to register once, and voted in two European elections and two municipal. Having moved here I registered to vote and did so in last year's municipal. Now I'm told there are two sparate lists of EU citizens, one for the municipal, one for the European, and I (and about ten others) are on one and not the other.

So I had an argument with the mayor, but it's the law and there's no changing it. Of course, the town hall clerk who registered me did not inform me that I needed to register a second time for the European election.

I've since checked the elections pages of the Interior Ministry site, and sure enough the information is there - for those who know how to Google it. It says there are two separate lists, and inscription in the one does not entail inscription in the other. There are even two different downloadable forms to fill in, identical except for the heading (one says Municipal, the other European, duh, and one is printed in red, the other in green...). The laws referred to are separate, one for the European elections, the other for the municipal. These laws institute a separate ("complementary") list for non-French EU citizens, but do not stipulate that there must be two lists, one for each type of election. That must have been a brilliant administrative decision at some point.

It is beyond me to understand what useful purpose is served by this complication. We have political personnel wringing their hands about low participation, and motivated European citizens deprived of their vote by administrative barriers that have no sensible justification.

Administrative complication + absence of information = discrimination.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 01:29:55 PM EST
It's the same in Italy, except that the town clerk did inform me that I had to fill in both forms.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Jun 9th, 2009 at 08:31:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hi all from from a noisy sports bar in sunny Spain!  I'm trying to do a results post for Ireland but really need to be able to import spreadsheet tables to do justice to the subtletess of votes transferring between candidates as candidates are eliminated from the count.  Anyone know a simple way of publishing a table in scoop without losing all the formatting?  I've tried saving the excel table as an xml and htm file but still lose the formating without which the numbers really aren't intelligible.  Many thanks if someone has a solution.

notes from no w here
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 06:20:06 PM EST
Do a screen capture of the excel table.

The brainless should not be in banking. — Willem Buitler
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jun 7th, 2009 at 06:26:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks - I managed to find an HTML fomat

notes from no w here
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Jun 8th, 2009 at 01:44:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Display:
Go to: [ European Tribune Homepage : Top of page : Top of comments ]