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Gender backlash and the Spending Review

by In Wales Sat Oct 23rd, 2010 at 05:09:56 AM EST

I'm still too angry about the ConDem Comprehensive Spending Review to be overly coherent at the moment.  If anyone saw clips of George Osborne being cheered on by his coalition friends as he announced cut after cut with a smug look on his face, you'll understand.  Parliament looked like a hall full of screeching monkeys.

Cuts need to be made but to make them so severe, so unfair and to relish them like this is sickening to see.  Labour were accused of being an ideologically driven Goverment, but good grief, that really pales into comparison here.


In the UK there is a requirement for public bodies and Government to do Equality Impact Assessments on any significant new policies (covering gender, race and disability).  The Treasury admitted that they did not do a gender impact assessment on the emergency budget (I doubt they did one for race or disability either but nobody is talking about that).  

The aim of an impact assessment is to determine whether there could be a detrimental impact that affects one group more than another, that is, indirect discrimination.  If negative impacts are found through the assessment then steps should be taken to mitigate the potential negative consequences.

The Fawcett Society took action against the Goverment for having not done an equality impact assessment on the emergency budget.

The Fawcett Society takes the cuts to court | Society | The Guardian

The Treasury is reported to have been stunned when the feminist Fawcett Society put in an application for a judicial review of its apparent failure to honour its legal duty under the Equality Act to give "due regard" to the impact on women.

The action followed an emergency budget that proposed an initial deficit reduction strategy of tax and benefit changes. Even before the projected 500,000 public sector job cuts (mainly affecting women) were announced, it was clear that women would be the biggest victims.

Even Tory MP Teresa May could see that some groups would be hit disproportionately.

Budget cuts could break equality laws, Theresa May warned chancellor | Politics | The Guardian

Theresa May, the home secretary and equalities minister, warned the chancellor that cuts in the budget could widen inequality in Britain and ran a "real risk" of breaking the law, a letter leaked to the Guardian shows.

The letter was sent to George Osborne on 9 June, less than a fortnight before his emergency budget, and was copied to David Cameron.

May wrote "there are real risks" that people ranging from ethnic minorities to women, to the disabled and the old, would be "disproportionately affected".

Some key figures are outlined in the Guardian today.

Cuts will hit women twice as hard as men, Commons research shows | Politics | The Guardian

Of the £8.5bn being raised by cutting direct contributions to individuals, £5.7bn - two thirds - is coming from women, while £2.7bn is being raised from men, the Commons library says.

In June's emergency budget £5.8bn was raised from women and £2.2bn from men.

That means that of the total £16bn being brought back into the exchequer by the coalition through direct tax benefit changes, £11bn will come from women.

Cooper shows that 70% of tax credits including childcare, working tax credits and other support is paid to mothers, as is 94% of child benefit. Some 60% of housing benefit, also due to be cut, is paid to women. According to the Daycare Trust, the spending review amounts to a £1,500-a-year cut in help with childcare costs.

Scroll down to the comments section and there you see the backlash loud and clear. For example...

Cuts will hit women twice as hard as men, Commons research shows | Politics | The Guardian

If the government is taking more from women, then it is taking back unearned crap given to women from men. You cannot take money from women, unless you make a special tax on women. What Mr Cameron is doing is stopping unearned payments to women.

Women deserve the cuts then.  Because we didn't deserve to have access to employment in the first place? And because we clearly don't make a productive contribution to the economy?  Various commenters accuse Yvette Cooper's statements of being based on thin air whilst making entirely spurious, speculative comments of their own.  Nothing new, I know.  But it makes me angry.

Never mind that the majority of women in the public sector are in low paid jobs, never mind that single parent households are more likely to be headed by women. Never mind that if affordable childcare and genuine flexible working opportunities aren't available then women are less likely to be able to do paid work. Never mind that women are still discriminated against in the workplace, and still don't have equal pay after 40 years of Equal Pay legislation. Never fucking well mind. The ConDem narrative on 'fairness' has really taken hold.

Not only has gender equality become background noise over the last few years, with progress on equality sliding backwards and experiencing more backlash - but now there is outrage at any suggestion that we should care about gender equality.  How are the Conservative's election claims to create the most family friendly country in the world panning out now?

The so-called 'quad' who make the key decisions on policy and the budget consist only of men - Cameron, Clegg, Osborne and Alexander.  The Government Equalities Office have taken a hit of 30% cuts.  The Equality and Human Rights Commission survived the bonfire of the quangos but has a huge budget cut.  The Women's National Commission was another not to survive:
Fawcett Society - Abolition of Women's National Commission: Fawcett's Response

"The abolition of the WNC will make it that much harder for government to devise informed policy that reflects the unique position of women in the UK. This decision also gives a clear indicator of the priority the new coalition attaches to furthering equality in the UK.

There is a whole separate rant to be had on disability and the demonisation of disabled people.  

Whilst the top 2% whinge that they will have to take the biggest share of the cuts, are they going to lose their homes? Will they not be able to eat? Will they have to give up leisure activities or have their children in schools with ballooning class sizes and shrinking resources, and no prospect of being able to afford a university education?

The Treasury have published an Equality Impact Assessment of the CSP, stating;

The Government is committed to fairness and promoting social mobility. Throughout the Spending Review process the Treasury has looked closely at the impact that decisions may have on different groups in society.

Find it here (pdf) if you can stomach it.  To me, it shows a profound and fundamental lack of understanding of inequality and how it manifests across different groups.

It admits that this isn't a categorical and detailed review of potential outcomes and that individual Departments will need to do their own.  Here are some gems:

Reducing Departmental spending will not necessarily mean increased inequalities if the same services can be provided more efficiently, or if resources are better targeted on the groups that are most in need of them.

...

It is likely that reductions in public spending will also lead to workforce reductions across the public sector. However, the decision of how to achieve the budget reductions necessary rests with individual public sector employers and therefore it is their responsibility to assess, and give due regard to, the impacts on equality of those decisions.

...

It may not always be possible to mitigate the impacts within a single policy while delivering savings. However, savings in one area allow for higher spending elsewhere, potentially on the same groups of people.

...

In order to understand the impact of changes in benefits and tax credits on men and women it is necessary to know how families share their income between themselves and their children (if any). It is not enough to simply know the gender of the claimant. It is therefore difficult to assess the impact on gender equality of changes to Child Benefit, which is paid to an individual claimant on behalf of the child, and not for the personal benefit of the claimant; as well as changes to tax credits which are paid on a household basis.

They've done an EIA, it just isn't a robust or good one, and it is shifting the responsibility over to the authorities who will have to implement the cuts.  

Bravo.  Fairness and equality, only if you can afford it.

Display:
This is almost too depressing for words.  What a bloody awful week.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Oct 23rd, 2010 at 05:15:41 AM EST
and we've another four and a half years of this.

Plus the Labour response has been terrible, they need new thinking on economics or it'll be more of the same when they get back in.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:40:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
European Tribune - Gender backlash and the Spending Review
They've done an EIA, it just isn't a robust or good one, and it is shifting the responsibility over to the authorities who will have to implement the cuts.  

How can it be a  working EIA if theyve pushed the responsibility over to the individual sub-authorities then how can they make anything that works? To claim that the assessment has been performed, when it's this casually performed as a government then you might as well not bother.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Oct 23rd, 2010 at 06:25:47 PM EST
Exactly, but it will be harder to challenge them on it in the courts. Easier to call for a judicial review for an EIA not done than for one shoddily done.  The slight of hand in this document is blatant to those who know equality, much less so to those who don't.

An especially nasty one that is picking up momentum is the tax credit and child benefit issue - the argument that the benefits are for children and not their guardians is shallow to say the least.  Guardians  need to be able to afford to run the homes that the children live in, not just provide food and clothes (let alone extra curricular activities).  But I'm seeing this argument be thrown about by those who think it is 'fair' to cut such benefits. If guardians (especially women) are in poverty, their children will be too.

A shocking statistic the First Minister gave us at a conference last week was that domestic violence is the main cause of death for women aged 19-44.  Fucking appalling.  When we talk about children's safety and keeping children out of poverty and providing opportunities to reach their potential, domestic violence is one issue that is crucial to tackle.  Budget cuts have directly hit those services that support women and children (and also men) who flee domestic violence.  Add that to women losing out financially, we'll see the perpetuation of those cycles of abuse and disadvantage.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Sat Oct 23rd, 2010 at 06:50:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
A shocking statistic the First Minister gave us at a conference last week was that domestic violence is the main cause of death for women aged 19-44.

I think I have seen similar statistics on a european level.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Sun Oct 24th, 2010 at 10:33:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
domestic violence is the main cause of death for women aged 19-44
I can't see how that can be the case.

Spain is making a huge deal of domestic violence and has been doing so for years. Recently (see coverage in El País) it was reported that more women died of gender violence in the first 10 months of this year than in all of last year (55 in 2009).

Spain's female population (for the stated age range) is 8 million - we're talking about a death rate of 1 in 140 thousand. Surely there are more road deaths than that, or cancer victims?

Unless, of course, Wales has a much bigger problem with machismo and deadly domestic violence than Spain does...

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 05:41:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Unless, of course, Wales has a much bigger problem with machismo and deadly domestic violence than Spain does...

Or better drivers...

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 06:05:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
By a factor of about 50...

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 06:09:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They're all on buses.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 06:23:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The First Minister also didn't believe the statistic when he first read it and had the research done to verify it.

Even though it is reasonably low profile media-wise, there are weekly stories in local rags about women who have been killed by a partner or ex partner or family member.  I can't possibly draw a comparison between Wales and Spain because I don't know how the statistics are recorded or defined, but I suspect that in both countries domestic violence is one of those issues that people turn a blind eye to. It is more prevalent than people wish to admit.  I grew up in that kind of environment and nobody else knew about it or acknowledged it - I can easily think back to two incidents that could have killed me accidentally although directly as a result of abuse (wouldn't have gone into these stats though since I was about 16).

After aged 44 is when health issues are more likely to kick in with more women dying from health problems.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 06:58:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
I suspect that in both countries domestic violence is one of those issues that people turn a blind eye to
Not in Spain, where there is a strong media campaign about it and they look into every death to determine whether it can be put down to gender violence.

That said, I do remember when I was in London (before 2009) there were hard-hitting banner ads in the tube and elsewhere about gender/domestic violence so also in Britain there was a strong push to raise awareness.

In Wales:

there are weekly stories in local rags about women who have been killed by a partner or ex partner or family member.
Like I said, the official figure is that about once a week in Spain in 2009 there was a death that could be classed as gender violence. Given the relative populations of Wales and Spain, maybe the death rate from domestic violence is 15 times higher than in Spain?

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 09:13:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are always campaigns on domestic violence but like all messages of gender inequality, it fades to background noise.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:18:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This I don't understand. If there were no gender equality campaigns you would be complaining about the problem being ignored. When there are campaigns, it's "background noise". What is it you want/expect?

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 04:15:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'd like people to care about the messages.  I'm not complaining about the campaigns, I'm just frustrated that people, businesses etc choose to ignore them.  

Maybe the campaigns need to change direction or step up in some way but I've been involved for years and I'm tired of gender inequality still being so 'ok' to the general public, and for 'feminism' being a target of hostility.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 04:51:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I knew the figure of 55 deaths a year in Spain because it's been front-page news in every newspaper when this year's count exceeded last year's. Though not all is rosy for equality in Spain. The newfangled Equality Ministry has been folded back (Google translation mangling) into a Ministry of Health, Social Policy and Equality.

Another item that was prominently reported recently was this:

ktla.com: Disfigured Afghan Woman: Disfigured Afghan Teen Unveils New Nose

A young Afghan teen who was mutilated by her husband has appeared in public for the first time showing off her new temporary, prosthetic nose.
Now, when you have a world in which things like disfigurement by acid are not unusual occurrences, what is the need to resort to easily debunked claims about murder rates? It only opens the message to attack through the fact that the campaign is misleading.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 05:05:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, God, is Google translate a piece of crap...

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 05:07:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is the first and only time I have heard that stat. It came from someone credible who claimed to have had it researched to verify it.  I really thought I had misheard it.

Nearly all of the messages going out are actual facts, figures, real stories of real women who have been abused or killed.  But this article was about gender equality generally - domestic violence is one symptom of gender inequality.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 11:52:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
it is reasonably low profile media-wise
You mean there isn't a British equivalent of this? (google translation)

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 09:17:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Women's Aid have similar bulletins to round up all domestic violence related news.  The funding for the Violence Against Women strategy in the UK is being cut drastically - gender inequality is not a priority of the coalition.  Many local services to tackle domestic violence are funded by local authorities which also face huge budget cuts.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:21:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
Women's Aid have similar bulletins to round up all domestic violence related news
You'ra talking about a charity/advocacy organization. I'm talking about the largest Spanish newspaper.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:24:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That wasn't clear.  You can google under any online version of a newspaper and get anything hitting search terms but I'm not aware of any newspapers rounding up those stories as a matter of course.  I don't know.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:37:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Road kills account for approximately 6½ in 100.000 Danes per year. So call it ten times as many (and Denmark has comparatively good drivers and safe roads for a European country. But death-by-auto is biased towards young males. Probably not by a factor of ten, though.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:57:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The only stats I could find suggest there are 100 murders each year in the UK which can be attributed to domestic violence.

Which isn't ideal, but it's far short of other causes of death. And it's a woman-only statistic. Anyone who knows someone who has worked in casualty knows that woman-on-man violence is significantly under-reported. Deaths may be rare, but actual bodily harm isn't. And emotional violence against men is barely considered a real phenomenon.

The traditional feminist 'men very bad aggressors, women very good victims' may not be the most useful way to look at the problem if the aim is to create relationships that are happy and peaceful.

Worldwide, some cultures have very non-Western ideas about marriage, and I can believe that murder and violence are endemic there in ways that are very different to what we'd expect or accept here.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 11:24:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ThatBritGuy:
The only stats I could find suggest there are 100 murders each year in the UK which can be attributed to domestic violence.
Considering the original claim was about women aged 19-44 which is very close to the child-bearing range, I thought maternal deaths at childbirth would be an appropriate statistic to compare this to. This from The Guardian: Women less likely to die in childbirth in Albania than in UK
The safest country in the world in which to give birth appears to be Italy, with a death rate of 3.9 women for every 100,000 births - down from 7.4 in 1990. Next come Sweden, Luxembourg and Australia. All have brought their death rates down by more than 1% over the same period. Israel, in 8th place and Malta, in 9th, have brought their death rates down by 3.2% and 4.7% respectively. But the UK had 8.4 deaths per 100,000 births in 1990 and 8.2 deaths in 2008, a drop of just 0.1%.
How does that translates to deaths per year?

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 11:33:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
UK female population between 15 and 45 is somewhere around 10 million. So that's around 1-2 domestic murders per 100,000 a year.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 11:52:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But 100 thousand women is not the same as 100 thousand births. So we need

National Statistics Online - Live births

There were 698,323 maternities in England and Wales in 2009. This is a decrease of 0.4 per cent, compared with 2008 when there were 701,297 maternities.

The General Fertility Rate (GFR) for 2009 was 63.7 live births per thousand women aged 15-44, a decrease compared with 63.8 in 2008. This is the first fall in the GFR since 2001, when the number of live births per thousand women aged 15-44 fell to 54.7 from 55.9 in 2000.
A maternal mortality of 8 per 100 thousand births translates to about 56 deaths per year given 700 thousand births.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 12:00:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Along with Helen's Beer site, there could also be a 'Get Your Numbers Right!' site at which migu does a Vorderman check of numbers in the media.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 12:31:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Huh?

Carol Vorderman

Vorderman's mother noticed a newspaper advertisement asking for a woman with good mathematical skills to appear as co-host on a quiz show for the fledgling fourth terrestrial channel and submitted an application on behalf of her daughter.[8] Thus, at the age of 21, Vorderman made her name on Countdown with Richard Whiteley from the show's inception in 1982 until Whiteley's death in June 2005. Initially Vorderman's only contribution to the show was the numbers game and she formed part of a five person presentation team. However, over the coming years the team was pared down and Vorderman's contribution increased. In latter years she was a joint main presenter, co-host and face of the show. Simon Nicol's musical album Consonant Please Carol (1992) takes its title from the customary dialogue in a show.


Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 12:37:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting, but tangential to the 150,000 cancer deaths in the UK every year.

I think we can ignore the suggestion that domestic violence is the leading cause of death in the West.

It may well be the leading cause of death elsewhere - as I understand it, the figure is worldwide.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 12:40:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We're talking about the 15-44 age range, not deaths in general.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 01:24:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Indeed. But I didn't think I'd need to point out that 150,000 is 1500 times greater than 100, and so even if only 10% of cancer deaths happen in the target demographic - which I doubt - there's still a difference of an order of magnitude or two between the two figures.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 04:24:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well from http://rds.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs09/hosb1109chap3.pdf but it dosn't give death rates for homicides. those figures are due out at some point this year

Stranger violence is more likely to be experienced by men while women are at greater risk of
domestic violence.
* According to the 2008/09 BCS, risk of stranger violence was substantially greater for
men than for women; 2.4 per cent of men were victims of stranger violence, compared
with 0.5 per cent of women. Half (50%) of violent incidents against men were stranger
violence, compared with less than a quarter (21%) of incidents against women. Most
(83%) victims in incidents of stranger violence were men (Tables 3.01 and 3.04).
* The risk of domestic violence, as measured by the main BCS, was significantly higher
for women (0.6%) than for men (0.2%). Around one in three (31%) violent incidents
against women was domestic violence, compared with five per cent of incidents against
men. In over three-quarters (77%) of incidents of domestic violence the victims were
women (Tables 3.01 and 3.04).
Figures from the BCS self-completion module on intimate violence give a more complete
picture of violence carried out by partners or family members. The higher risk of domestic
violence victimisation for women is also evident in figures derived from this module. Based
on the 2008/09 module, six per cent of women aged 16 to 59 were victims of domestic
abuse in the past year compared with four per cent of men. Prevalence of any domestic
abuse has decreased for men but not for women between the 2007/08 and 2008/09 BCS,
although prevalence of any domestic abuse for both men and women is lower compared
with the 2004/05 BCS (Table 3.11).21
In 2008/09, as in previous years, (non-sexual) partner abuse was the most common type of
intimate violence, experienced by four per cent of women and three per cent of men in the
last year. Prevalence of (non-sexual) family abuse was lower with two per cent of both men
and women aged 16 to 59 reporting having experienced this form of intimate violence.
Among men the prevalence of (non-sexual) partner abuse has decreased (from 4% to 3%)
compared with the previous year and is at a lower level than the 2004/05 BCS. (Non-sexual)
family abuse has increased among men (from 1% to 2%) compared with the previous year
and is at a similar level to the 2004/05 BCS. Among women, both (non-sexual) partner abuse
and (non-sexual) family abuse remained stable compared with the previous year, although
they are both at a lower level compared with the 2004/05 BCS (Table 3.12).22
Offenders in violent incidents were most likely to be young (in 55% of violent incidents the
offender was believed to be aged between 16 and 24 years) and male (81% of violent
incidents involved male offenders), as was the case with victims of overall violent crime. In
half (50%) of violent incidents reported to BCS interviewers the offender was a stranger
(Table 3.14).
21


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 12:36:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
http://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons/lib/research/rp99/rp99-056.pdf

For the 650 offences currently recorded as homicide in England and Wales for 1997,
almost two thirds of the victims (426 offences) were male. There were 224 female
victims. The proportion of female victims has been around a third for the past three
years, but in the early 1990s the proportion of female victims was higher, at around 40%.
Almost four fifths of all female victims and just over half of all male victims knew the
main or only suspect before the killing. A present or former partner or lover killed almost
half of female victims, while for men the same held for only 8% of victims. A fifth of
women victims were killed by family members and a third of men by someone they knew
but not family or a partner. Only 12% of women were killed by a stranger, compared to
31% of men.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 02:29:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah death statistics, although a couple of years out of date are Here

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 02:39:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
OK so female "Deaths by external causes of morbidity and mortality" for those age groups totals 1000 per year the vast majority of those must be accidents as that is far in excess of the total number of murders per year, the total number of Males of the same age group dying annually is 3682.  

Female deaths per year classed as murder is 224 and almost half were killed by partners or former partners so at most 112 (Which is still a horrific number)

But
Infectious diseases                 132
Neoplasms                          2041
Endocrine and nutritional diseases  156
Mental and behavioural disorders    128
Diseases of the nervous system      304
diseases of the circulatory system  750
diseases of the respiratory system  216
diseases of the digestive system    494
congenital malformations            107

Now looking at the individual categories, domestic violence is way down the list, but it could be that the individual classifications have been further split until the  domestic violence figure comes out on top.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 02:59:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I googled for domestic violence deaths UK and along with UK stats, similar headline stats came up for individual states in the US.

What Is Domestic Violence? | Introduction

Some health professionals see domestic violence primarily as a criminal justice issue, resenting the expectation that they should respond to domestic abuse when they already have so much pressure to deliver the basics in the time that they have with patients. However the mortality rate in particular should speak for itself:

  • Domestic violence is the leading cause of morbidity for women aged 19-44 - greater than cancer, war and motor vehicle accidents .
  • In England and Wales, two women a week die at the hands of their domestic violence abuser.
  • Home Office figures published in February 2008 reveal that thirty three children were murdered by their parents in the previous year.
  • Amongst a group of pregnant women attending primary care in East London, 5% reported that domestic abuse had at sometime in the past caused them to miscarry.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 04:04:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm wondering if the 'leading cause of death' statistic isn't UK specific?  That's the problem with headlines.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 04:06:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well the figures in the statistics are UK by age (and can be broken down further however the age groups are not exact, I had to go from 20 not 19), and show Cancer deaths to be around 20 times as large as domestic violence for the age groups mentioned

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 04:25:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's still wrong. Two per week is around a hundred, which is what I said originally - and is far lower than the numbers ceebs quoted for other causes.

Put simply, it's rhetoric, not fact.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 04:31:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Comparison with France checks out, since 156 women (of all ages) died as a result of domestic violence in 2008. (lost the link now). Certainly not the leading cause of death.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 04:58:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok but it came from somewhere, I'd love to see the same critique be applied by the media to every ugly lie the right spew forth.

I'll go back to some people who might know where the stat emerged from so I can figure out how it turned into the 'leading cause of death' thing.  It appears elsewhere too.

Violence Prevention Program

Domestic violence and sexual assault are leading causes of injuries for girls and women between the ages of 15 and 44 in the state of Georgia. 

Myths and Facts about Domestic Violence

Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women between ages 15 and 44 in the united States - more than car accidents, muggings, and rapes combined. (Uniform Crime Reports, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1991)

Taken from this source

For women aged between 19 and 44 domestic violence is the leading cause of death, higher than cancer or road accidents. It is estimated that two women a week are killed by their partner or ex partner. ("Crime in England and Wales 2003")

Incorrectly reported (perhaps the largest cause of injury headline) and then repeated perhaps.
Still unnecessary and too high even if only an average of two per week are reported as domestic violence related deaths.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 06:08:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As I've said before, what's the point of freedom of the press if they're not going to use it to hold anyone who should be to account. It's not like it was difficult to put these figures together, but time and again media organisations parrot press releases rather than ask questions when faced with right wing madness.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 07:28:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
It appears elsewhere too.

I believe I've done a fair bit of digging into where the meme comes from. It would seem to be necessary to find out from what stats the Council of Europe was basing its 2002 claim. See comment below.

BTW, the First Minister should check on his fact-checkers.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 01:53:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah-hah. Here's an enlightening page that has been pulled from Amnesty International's anti-violence against women campaign, but is in Google cache:

Stop Violence Against Women: 'It's in our hands' - Amnesty International

Errata

Materials produced for Amnesty International's global campaign to Stop Violence against Women have made reference to a statement, attributed to the Council of Europe, that "domestic violence is the major cause of death and disability for women aged 16 to 44 and accounts for more death and ill-health than cancer or traffic accidents". This statement does not accurately reflect the data it refers to. It is therefore withdrawn from existing AI materials to be replaced with the correct statement, featured in bold print below

In a 1994 study using data from a 1993 World Bank modelling exercise, of ten selected causes and risk factors for disability and death among women between the age of 15 and 44, rape and domestic violence rated higher than cancer, motor vehicle accidents, war and malaria [Lori L. Heise, Jacqueline Pitanguy and Adrienne Germain, 1994, Violence against Women: The Hidden Health Burden (World Bank Discussion Paper 255), World Bank]

The content of the statement used by AI to date can be traced to Council of Europe Recommendation 1582 (27/09/2002) (1) which itself does not include a citation. The statement (or some variation of it) has been used widely worldwide, including by women's groups, public health organisations, and the US Department of State. It is variously attributed to the World Bank, the World Health Organisation, Amnesty International, and the Council of Europe.

The original source of the incorrect statement appears to be: Lori L. Heise, Jacqueline Pitanguy and Adrienne Germain, 1994, Violence against Women: The Hidden Health Burden (World Bank Discussion Paper 255), World Bank.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 02:12:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The origin of the meme is therefore in this 1994 World Bank paper (pdf):

Lori L. Heise, Jacqueline Pitanguy and Adrienne Germain, 1994, Violence against Women: The Hidden Health Burden (World Bank Discussion Paper 255), World Bank.

I have dl'd but no time to look into further.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 02:16:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Have had a glance at it and used search a bit. Seems like an honest study with reasonable recommendations.

Does not contain the phrase "leading cause of death", and contains the phrase "leading cause of injury" in one place, page 18:

A three-month surveillance survey in Alexandria, Egypt, indicated that domestic violence was the leading cause of injury to women, accounting for 27.9 percent of all visits by women to area trauma units (Graitcer, personal communication, 1994).

But that is not crucial data.

Appendix C includes a table on a much more sensible metric then "leading cause of death":

Appendix table C.1 Disabilty-adjusted life years lost to women age 15 to 44 due to conditons attributable to domestic violence and rape

Unfortunately we only get the world-wide sample for 15-44 year olds as:

   A full discussion of the methodology, including the estimation of incidence by region and by age group and assumptions about disability weights, age-weighting, and the discount rate, is contained in Murray forthcoming and Murray and Lopez forthcoming.

I have no idea how anyone can read this and then go start a meme about "leading cause of death". With the follow-ups a list of "lost time per woman due to domestic violence and rape in regions" should on the other hand be both substantiated by the research and be an understandable metric.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 01:38:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Read it a bit more thoroughly and found this table om page 17:

Table5 Estimated global health burden of selected conditions for women age 15 to 44

                              Disabilty-adjusted life
                                  years lost to women
                                        (millions)
   Maternal conditions                      29.0
       Sepsis                                  10.0
       Obstructed labor                     15.8

   STDs (excluding HIV)                    15.8
       Pelvic inflammatory disease        12.8

   Tuberculosis                           10.9

   HIV                                          10.6

   Cardiovascular disease                    10.5

   Rape and domestic violence              9.5

   All cancers                                9.0
       Breast                                 1.4
       Cervical                               1.0

    Motor vehicle accidents           4.2

    War                                 2.7

    Malaria                                   2.3

Probably what Amnesty refers to. Note that these are global numbers.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 03:34:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I saw the table. Pity the pdf is a scan and not searchable.

But it would seem the Council of Europe has a lot to answer for in enabling and "authorising" that meme.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 05:19:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Indeed.

I wonder if the follow-ups they refer to has domestic violence at the top (of the selected conditions) in rich countries, simply from lowering other causes. And then leading causes of DALYs -> leading cause of death. Or something.

My pdf was searchable, and able to reasonably well copy text. Apparently my reader has some image->text interpretation thing going. Nothing I had to go hunt for, just standard pdf-reader that came with Ubuntu. Not that Linux is superior or anything :)

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Thu Oct 28th, 2010 at 02:18:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks, I've passed this on.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 03:54:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
I'd love to see the same critique be applied by the media to every ugly lie the right spew forth

Well, we do our best.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 02:20:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
I'd love to see the same critique be applied by the media to every ugly lie the right spew forth
If that's how you're going to react, I'll do my best to stay away from your advocacy in the future.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 04:23:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why? Is there something wrong with wishing the media would examine rightwing lies instead of just echoing them?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 04:40:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
domestic violence is the leading cause of death, higher than cancer or road accidents. It is estimated that two women a week are killed by their partner or ex partner. ("Crime in England and Wales 2003")
How could the writer of that report put those two sentences together and not think something was wrong somewhere?

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 04:55:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Laziness. The "leading cause of death" meme has been around for some time, and, as I've shown, can be traced back à la Snopes. It had the authority of organisms as Serious as the Council of Europe, Amnesty, etc. And has almost as a matter of course been strung together with the "n women a week" or, "a woman is killed once every n days" factoid. I've read and heard exactly the same stringing together in French.

This is not a defence of writers who simply pick up on "information" of that kind and repeat it because it seems to have the right pedigree (and don't even think twice about what it means). Just an explanation (with factual backing, see my other comments) of how this disinformation made its way into standard (unthinking) discourse.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 05:06:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reporters have no sense of scale.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 05:59:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reporters are innumerate.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 06:04:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Come now. Reporters know about football fields and Olympic swimming pools. Isn't that a sense of scale?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 06:57:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ah but ask one how many football fields you can fit into an Olympic swimming pool, and they get confused very quickly.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 08:14:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Two of the three sources say "leading cause of injury".

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 05:14:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, ok.  It has been pulled apart, the source of error identified and I have passed it on to an adviser in the Assembly so it doesn't get repeated.  

I thought I'd misheard the stat, but didn't google deep enough to identify the error, even though I did think it sounded too high.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 11:46:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Y'all should take a look at this page from a WHO report.

Then read what, as far as I can trace back (though it may go back further) is the origin of this leading-cause-of-death meme. The Council of Europe, which ran a campaign against domestic violence earlier in the decade, stated this in a resolution in 2002:

Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly

Statistics shows that for women between 16 and 44 years of age, domestic violence is thought to be the major cause of death and invalidity, ahead of cancer, road accidents and even war.

A number of sources I've seen refer back to this COE point. I haven't been able, though, to find an instance where the COE is repeating it today. I imagine they have realized it's completely false.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 04:55:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not "completely false", since "invalidity" is added in.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 05:00:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Having a quick look at Swedish statistics:

Döda i riket efter dödsorsak, ålder och kön. År

Döda i riket efter dödsorsak, ålder och kön. År 1969-1996

I learn that cancer is not one cause of death, it is 12 out of 52 (in Swedish statistics). Domestic violence is not a cause of death. And from that simple fact, you learn that "leading cause of death" totally depends on how you define causes. In Sweden, in 1996 suicide was the leading cause of death among women 20-44, 111 out of 771. 18 murders and 38 "damage by unknown origin", which I interpret as foul play suspected but not proven. (Btw, 38 deaths by traffic and 5 deaths by childbirth.)

When I think about it, what I had heard on european level was women in their 20ies. In Sweden in 1996 170 women died in their 20ies. 4 murders, 35 suicides, and 10 "damage by unknown origin". An in-depth study of these might yield more originating from domestic violence, then the 20 from traffic (largest after suicide). Or not. Then again in some countries traffic might be separated in different categories. And so on.

(Death by alcohol psychosis and death by other mental illnesses are counted in two separate categories and are not counted in suicides.)

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 05:43:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 greater than cancer, war and motor vehicle accidents

War? Who is the U.K at war with? I may be wrong, but I would have expected cancer rates to be low for that group as well. What about more plausible guesses such as suicide and drug abuse (some of which may be a result of domestic violence, of course).

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 04:15:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Domestic violence is the leading cause of morbidity for women aged 19-44 - greater than cancer, war and motor vehicle accidents .

Aha! Now I see where the dog's buried.

Morbidity != mortality.

That abuse is a leading cause of morbidity is a much more plausible claim than that it should be a leading cause of mortality. The ratio of cripples to kills for aggressive cancers or car accidents is bound to be much lower than for domestic abuse.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 08:59:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
JakeS:
The ratio of cripples to kills for aggressive cancers or car accidents is bound to be much lower than for domestic abuse.

I don't think that's obvious.

If, rather than use the term "cripple", we were to take morbibity in a very broad sense as ill health or physical and psychic suffering, then it might be possible to support it. Especially as domestic violence is often chronic.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 02:00:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Cripples to kills ratio" was a rhetorical flourish on my part. Morbidities do not have to be crippling, they just has to impair your health outcomes. Presumably there's a threshold below which they no longer count (otherwise, the common cold would be the leading cause of morbidity for any demographic anywhere in the first world). But, my familiarity with the subject being somewhat superficial, I couldn't tell you precisely where that cutoff is.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 05:40:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Good catch.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Oct 27th, 2010 at 04:24:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In Spain the number of traffic deaths was just over 2000 in 2008, down from the figure of 5000 a year I remembered from the 1990s. that's about one in 20 thousand or 5 in 100 thousand, so in the ballpark of the Danish figures.

Of all the ways of organizing banking, the worst is the one we have today — Mervyn King, 25 October 2010
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 11:28:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Oct 23rd, 2010 at 07:12:35 PM EST
European Tribune - Comments - Gender backlash and the Spending Review

Women deserve the cuts then.  Because we didn't deserve to have access to employment in the first place? And because we clearly don't make a productive contribution to the economy?  Various commenters accuse Yvette Cooper's statements of being based on thin air whilst making entirely spurious, speculative comments of their own.  Nothing new, I know.  But it makes me angry.

Never mind that the majority of women in the public sector are in low paid jobs, never mind that single parent households are more likely to be headed by women. Never mind that if affordable childcare and genuine flexible working opportunities aren't available then women are less likely to be able to do paid work. Never mind that women are still discriminated against in the workplace, and still don't have equal pay after 40 years of Equal Pay legislation. Never fucking well mind. The ConDem narrative on 'fairness' has really taken hold.

Not only has gender equality become background noise over the last few years, with progress on equality sliding backwards and experiencing more backlash - but now there is outrage at any suggestion that we should care about gender equality.  How are the Conservative's election claims to create the most family friendly country in the world panning out now?

The tendency to kick those who are down and then blame them for provoking the kicking by being weak is an utterly disgusting feature in us hairless monkeys, I call it the fascist impulse. No wonder that the cuts in the present zeitgeist gives comfort to those who have never accepted the notion of gender equality. And family friendly I guess means in favor of patriarchal family structures.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Sun Oct 24th, 2010 at 10:48:23 AM EST
Even Tory MP Teresa May could see that some groups would be hit disproportionately.

Yes, but what she can't admit is that it was by design. The Tories have no concept of Fair, simply a "winner takes all" attitude that penalises the majority for not being born rich and greedy.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Oct 26th, 2010 at 10:43:49 AM EST


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