Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Thursday Open Thread

by In Wales Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 11:38:52 AM EST

Today's gossip, all in here...


Display:
Allllll the gossip...
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 11:45:41 AM EST
My gypsy 'cousin', King of the Village, is sadly in hospital. He fell off the roof of his pub yesterday while preparing everything for his summer terrace, broke both legs and screwed up his knees - requiring operations. 6 weeks, legs straight in plaster, not nice.

I can't find out where he is. He's not answering and the rest of the clan change their mobile numbers when the wind changes - so I'll have to do some research.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 11:58:09 AM EST
Ouch, that sounds awful. I hope he recovers fully and quickly.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:19:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks - I shall tell him.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:21:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
does he need an emergency bar worker ? Oh wait, no real ale. Strike that.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:27:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think in that place all you have to do is go around and slip in the intravenous beer drips of the customers "from barrel to bloodstream'. Cuts out the middleman again.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:24:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You have a cousin ... a "gypsy" (?) ... who is "King of the Village" ?  What Village?  The Village People?  I mean, just in that name he's asking for trouble.

Hi!  I'm Twank, King of the Manure Pile.  See how that works?  I'm asking for bad shit to happen.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:49:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
King of the Manure Pile.

Suddenly it all makes sense

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:02:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It took till now?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:04:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm slow

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:06:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
All the best for recovery to your "cousin," Sven.  Ouch.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:50:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks CH! I found out where he is. Hyvinkää Regional. He's being operated on tonight. He's a tough old bird - a boxer in his youth, heavy gangster in his twenties, alcoholic by 30. Went to jail and came out clean in every way. Now comes complete with the traditional heart of gold. Well, watch of gold anyway ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:47:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
FT.com / Europe - ECB warns of global imbalances threat
Distortions in the global economy that provided the backdrop to the financial crisis threaten to widen again and upset the worldwide recovery, the European Central Bank has warned.

In unusually blunt language, the ECB has made clear its fear that governments are not doing enough to put the global economy back on a sustainable growth path - despite international policy initiatives in the past year.

"At the current juncture, global imbalances continue to pose a key risk to global macroeconomic and financial stability . . . The stakes are high to prevent a disorderly adjustment in the future that would be costly to all economies," it concludes in a special article in its monthly bulletin published on Thursday.

The report's inclusion in the ECB's normally restrained monthly bulletin, highlights the Frankfurt-based institution's worries about the strength of the economic rebound. In its monthly commentary on world economic developments, it also concludes that the US's return to growth has "important characteristics of past jobless recoveries".



"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char
by Melanchthon on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:04:28 PM EST
The ECB should look at the beam in its own eye first: the imbalances within the Eurozone.

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:22:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Who, besides the USA, do they recommend to be net importers?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:17:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
FT.com / Europe - Greece seeks talks on €30bn rescue
Greece capitulated to market pressure on Thursday and asked the European Commission for "consultations" on a €30bn ($41bn) loan package to stave off default.

George Papaconstantinou, finance minister, said in a letter to Brussels the government wanted to discuss "a multi-year economic policy programme with the Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund."
...
The move came as yields on 10-year Greek bonds surged to a record high. Spreads over German Bunds reached 460 basis points before falling back to around 400 basis points after Mr Papaconstantinou's announcement was made.

The IMF would be expected to make available another €10bn-€15bn as a stand-by loan on top of the €30bn available from eurozone member-states.



"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char
by Melanchthon on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:09:31 PM EST
William Hill is taking bets on UK planes being grounded til midnight Monday at odds of 10/1.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:09:42 PM EST
It's a fair bet. Southerlies from Iceland are forecast till at least then and there's no sign of the eruption abating.

So while that wind blows, no planes will fly.

Actually we've had a couple of prop planes come over, obviously chartered by city people needing to get across to the Netherlands quickly. aside from that, the skies have been eerily clear (we're under one of the major flightpaths into Heathrow)

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:26:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well exc3pt for the clouds, its been very quiet here, apparently the local air ambulance and police helicopters have also been grounded.

(but even though lots of people are stuck around airports without hotel rooms, they haven't cancelled the election debates which are no doubt using up a large amount of hotel rooms around Manchester airport.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:33:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
given that politicians like to flit about by air to make them feel important cover lots of ground, if this continues it could be the greenest election for some time.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:45:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apparently BAA are saying that flights will restart tomorrow 7am.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:56:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Irish authorities are talking about reviewing the situation 6am tomorrow. This will not make my mother happy, who last I heard was in an airport in Portugal.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:02:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, apparently she's ended up in a five-star hotel with a nice dinner and is "about to head out with one of the guys from the tour for a look around the area".
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 05:51:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Southerlies from Iceland?

Britain's moved up to the North Pole?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:41:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought you named them by where they were going. A london bound train is one going to london, it's rarely named for where it's come from.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:44:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Works the other way for winds - northerlies come from the north, etc.

Seems a bit odd for low level aircraft to be worrying about ash - isn't it a high level phenomenon?

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:53:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can imagine that flying through an ash plume above or close downwind to a volcano ain't smart but I struggle to understand how 1,000 km away it's any worse than when a Southerly deposits Saharan sand on my car via a rain shower, as happens at least twice a year.

Health and Safety Jobsworth stuff I reckon.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:02:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think its worse because sand grains are normally smooth, so bounce  the outside surface is less likely to stick on the inside of hot engines. Lava dust particles are more jagged and abrasive, so more likely to damage and stick.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:22:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Iceland eruption: New satellite image of volcanic ash cloud
ScienceDaily (Apr. 15, 2010) -- A vast cloud of volcanic ash has been sweeping across parts of northern Europe from the eruption of a volcano in Iceland. The European Space Agency's Envisat satellite has imaged the ash cloud, showing for example the extent over the UK, more than 1,000 kilometers away.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:27:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think Sahara dust shows up like that in satellite pictures...

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:29:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]


"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson
by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:59:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:23:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So I did.

And what's your view?

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:12:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So far as I know there's one famous case of an airliner temporarily losing all engines on a flight near Indonesia after flying through an ash cloud.

But that was an actual flight through the actual ash cloud. And after leaving the actual ash cloud some of the engines were restarted - which was nerve-wracking at the time, but not the disaster it might have been.

Were there any ash-crashes after Mt St Helens? Have there been any other examples of planes brought down by distant ash?

Hekla on Iceland has erupted regularly, sometimes with actual ash clouds, but I don't remember any previous air panics.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:29:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There was a case of an airplane losing power to its engines when it flew through a volcanic ash plume in Alaska in the 1990s as well.

As to Mount St. Helens, it did impact air travel:

CVO Website - Tilling, et.al., 1990, Eruptions of Mount St. Helens: Past, Present, and Future

Because visibility was greatly decreased during the ash fall, many highways and roads were closed to traffic, some only for a few hours, but others for weeks. Interstate 90 from Seattle to Spokane, Washington, was closed for a week. Air transportation was disrupted for a few days to 2 weeks as several airports in eastern Washington shut down due to ash accumulation and attendant poor visibility. Over a thousand commercial flights were cancelled following airport closures.

Mount St. Helens is also directly below the flight path for Sea-Tac Airport. No flights went directly through the ash plume (it erupted at about 8:30 on a Sunday morning) but the airport was briefly closed as a result. Flight paths were altered to avoid the volcano for a while thereafter. Other and smaller airports to the east, obviously, saw greater impacts.

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 01:44:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They've grounded the search and rescue copters in a zone on the east coast here - extra naval vessel stationed off the coast and life boats on standby to increase the cover.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:14:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Winds are named for the direction from which they blow.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:21:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, if you're waiting in London, you're not going to call it the London train...

Mind you, you can call it what you like :)

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:08:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, but when in london, don't get on the london bound train. You'll not be going anywhere. Generally in London one tends to take trains that are going elsewhere, to fancy places like Luton or thamesmead.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:11:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One might just be waiting for someone who's arriving on a train.

"Pray tell, dear informationdeskperson, when does the Manchester train get in?"

But that was in my day, maybe trains from Manchester don't get in any more.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:55:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can point to at least one heartbroken boy in Bremen, as the girls cannot fly here for their concert.  Norway's grounded, as is Bremen.

The rare whisky tasting after the concert, which the band, being Norwegian, looked forward to, will not take place without the maidens of honor.

I do not feel upstaged at all, as the anthropomorphic female guiding our spaceball spits in the face of IceSave.  Just sad, as there's nothing better than rare whisky shared with talented people.  Especially if they're of the female persuasion, joined by the effervescent Miss Sophie from Berlin.

Perhaps i will take solace in the 4th crystal clear blue spring evening inarow herein Bremen.



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:36:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah those terrible Icelanders, first they steal  British and Dutch peoples money, then they do all they can to keep women from the mighty Horse. Haven't they been added to the Axis of Evil yet?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:42:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, what percent of Iceland swallowed the kool-aid?  She's only spitting on the guilty, and the rest is what she call's euphemistically "collateral damage."

And believe me, the girls will be back soon.  if not to visit me, at least for the whisky.

In fact, since there's background discussion of a Bremen meetup, of which i've been extreeemely negligent, perhaps it should be planned around their next concert.

After all, what other beauties sing about the wind going out to the sea?

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:55:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
that makes an awful lot of sense. Just so long as it's not when we're all supposed to be in Paris.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:03:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Weill, with all aircraft grounded for a while, it's a good job Britain built that high speed rail network so that we're not isolated in such a circumstance.

Oh ... bugger

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:47:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, there's still Eurostar to escape to the high-speed rail system in Europe. But it's going to be tough for businessmen. I looked at availability  this afternoon for London-Paris, and they still have 196 Euro tickets in coach. But business class at 286 Euro is completely sold out...
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 03:19:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One of our colleagues here on ET was stranded in Bremen by flight cancellations, and must stand on the ICE all the way to Koeln, 3 hours.  Then stand on the Thalys all the way to Paris, another 3 hours.  Trains are completely full to the brim.

Some in the wind business are already seeking other travel to get to Warsaw for next week's EWEA conference.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 04:46:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm glad I booked my trip to Germany next weekend long ago,
with reservations....

And if this is still going on by next week, it's going to be a real
pain getting around in Italy if the train strike on April 23/24 isn't called
off.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 05:11:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You're not the one stuck on an island with all the ferrys full.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 03:20:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
no doubt conspiracy theorists will be linking it with this

Massive fireball reported across Midwestern sky - CNN.com

(CNN) -- Authorities in several Midwestern states were flooded Wednesday night with reports of a gigantic fireball lighting up the sky, the National Weather Service said.

The fireball was visible for about 15 minutes beginning about 10 p.m., said the National Weather Service in Sullivan, Wisconsin, just west of Milwaukee.

"The fireball was seen over the northern sky, moving from west to east," said the NWS in the Quad Cities area, which includes parts of Iowa and Illinois.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:31:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yea, sorry about that. My bad. You shoulda seen this curry I had.......

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:35:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not to worry.  That was me pre-coging the failed visit of Katzenjammer to Bremen, angry against the complacent skies.

(But happy the coal people in the USA are now on the defensive, just before Roselle has to go to court to defend his actions against Massey.)

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:41:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
[Portugal's] debt has been largely financed by foreigners, and as with Greece, the country has not paid interest outright, but instead refinances its interest payments each year by issuing new debt.  By 2012 Portugal's debt-to-G.D.P. ratio should reach 108 percent of G.D.P. if the country meets its planned budget deficit targets.  At some point financial markets will simply refuse to finance this Ponzi game.

and the euro debt 'doom machine':

While these nations delay, the European Union with its bailout programs -- assisted by Jean-Claude Trichet's European Central Bank -- provides financing.  The governments issue bonds; European commercial banks buy them and then deposit these at the European Central Bank as collateral for freshly printed money.  The bank has become the silent facilitator of profligate spending in the euro zone.

Last week the European Central Bank had a chance to dismantle this doom machine when the board of governors announced new rules for determining what debts could be used as collateral at the central bank.

Some anticipated the central bank might plan to tighten the rules gradually, thereby preventing the Greek government from issuing too many new bonds that could be financed at the bank.  But the bank did not do that.  In fact, the bank's governors did the opposite:  they made it even easier for Greece, Portugal and any other nation to borrow in 2011 and beyond.  Indeed, under the new lax rules you need only to convince one rating agency (and we all know how easy that is) that your debt is not junk in order to get financing from the European Central Bank.

Peter Boone is upset that Trichet, Merkel and Sarkozy did not heed his and Simon Johnson's previous remarks about the crisis:

... There are many nations now waiting on the sidelines:  How can Mr. Trichet and the Germans feel comfortable that new entrants will not copy the Greek Ponzi game once they gain access to ECB's funding windows if the new entrants see Greece get a new large loan package at subsidized interest rates?   The ECB should be rightly concerned that such actions would only make fiscal probity, and therefore monetary policy, far harder to control in the euro zone. <...>

The German population detests providing bailouts to periphery nations, while the debtors of the Euro zone would like the same game to continue a little bit longer.  Meanwhile, the Greeks continue to drag their feet on serious reform while claiming to be "courageous"- presumably they are hoping, magically, that markets will start to want to lend to them again at very low rates in the midst of a fiscal program with little hope for long term success.  It all seems horribly reminiscent to those early days when Argentina slid towards a cruel collapse.

Reading these essays, my thoughts were very similar to Vladimir's:

Greece = Bear Stearns
Portugal = Lehman Brothers
Spain = AIG


The point is not to be right, but to get to right.
by marco on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:11:17 PM EST
as with Greece, the country has not paid interest outright, but instead refinances its interest payments each year by issuing new debt

This is what Minsky called Ponzi Finance: borrowing to pay interest.

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:18:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why not just extend the repayment terms?

Surely, for the creditors, that's a better outcome than restructuring.

by Upstate NY on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 07:42:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
While these nations delay, the European Union with its bailout programs -- assisted by Jean-Claude Trichet's European Central Bank -- provides financing.  The governments issue bonds; European commercial banks buy them and then deposit these at the European Central Bank as collateral for freshly printed money.  The bank has become the silent facilitator of profligate spending in the euro zone.

The European Central Bank is legally barred from doing what all other Central Banks do: assist the government's fiscal policy. In fact the Central Bank only gets to issue currency by government fiat. It makes no sense that then the government is hamstrung by none other than the bank of its own creation.

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:21:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
finally, somebody says something that is a crystal clear determinant.

Guardian - Deborah Orr - The village that shows us what society really means

Part of the problem is that the British are no longer very governable. Britain is largely a nation of libertarians, whether of the left or the right, who do not want to be told what to do, or how to do it. We despise politicians because they always want to tell us what to do and how to do it - that's why they are politicians. Dimly, the Conservatives recognise this, which is why they are concentrating on explaining what they won't do, rather than what they will. But all Britain wants or needs really, is a government that will persuade the powerful that it is right to behave in a manner that is responsible, humane and generous, and help the people who can't help themselves.

We have had 13 years of a government that thought it could do the latter, without doing the former. Come 6 May, we might just end up with a government that is eager to do neither.

That's exactly the point;-
1)a government that will persuade the powerful that it is right to behave in a manner that is responsible, humane and generous
2) helping the people who can't help themselves.

I got so annoyed with NuLab for failing to do the first. I know labour do 2, and I hate the tories for failing to do either. But as far as I can see, if you don't do the first, the second is almost beside the point. If you do the first, the second comes almost by default.

The role of government is to protect the weak from the powerful. That is the heart of the social contract Labour wrote with the voters after WWII. They might have done more to rein in the powerful, but setting up the Health service, the welfare state, nationalizing the coal mines, gas producers and the railways seemed like a fairly ambitious agenda and people were happy with that.

We forgot. It took thatcher to remind us what happens when the government sides with the powerful against the weak. And for 30 years, givernment has been giving us a right good kicking, and NuLab were a part of that as well.

It's time we remembered.

After NuLab lose and hopefully Brown wanders off to his bunker for a long and hopefully happy retirement, we need to find people in the Labour party willing to embrace an agenda that means taking on the powerful.  Vote InWales for Labour Leaderene

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:42:39 PM EST
Put me in power.  The guillotines will run non-stop for the first year.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:53:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yout do realise that Robespierre was guillotined in the end, too? (And then all the Revolution led to an Emperor?)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:13:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, but with ME(EEEEE) it'll all be different.  Wait till the US disintegrates and I take over Californica.  Nothing but good shit.  Helen will be the Secretary of Beer, a cabinet post.  Her own brewery and pub, financed by my truffle sales. How's that for starters?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:18:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hah! That's more like Danton, so you'll get under the guillotine even faster :-)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:27:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
THE Twank:
Put me in power.

Ubu Roi

"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char

by Melanchthon on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:19:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ubu Roi ???  I get the Roi part but Ubu?  Like You - Be - You ?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:21:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Please,read the wikipedia description of the character...

"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char
by Melanchthon on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:25:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well harumph.  Here I am, trying to make thinks better with a little (a lot, actually) beheadings and that's the thanks I get.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:32:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's a very Ubu thing to say.

You may command, O Majesty. Melanchthon will finger the suspects, I'll trip the switch, and Helen will sit out in front knitting. And we'll all have truffles and beer.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:17:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You may command, O Majesty. Melanchthon will finger the suspects, I'll trip the switch, and Helen will sit out in front knitting drinking. And she'll have truffles with her beer.

There. Fixed.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:20:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Rebellion, huh? I can see the revolution is going to turn on its own.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:25:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Not to worry, afew, some of us drinkers will knit if we must Helen cover.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:29:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Very!

I helped Paul Watson put the play on at the Gulbenkian in '68. My innovation was to use the Beachboys as soundtrack, with 'Good Vibrations' as a leitmotif.  What was I thinking?

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:54:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've been looking for the right model of guillotine for some time.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:14:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The single mother's manifesto - David Cameron says the `nasty party' that castigated people like me has changed. I'm not buying it

Yesterday's Conservative manifesto makes it clear that the Tories aim for less governmental support for the needy, and more input from the "third sector": charity. It also reiterates the flagship policy so proudly defended by David Cameron last weekend, that of "sticking up for marriage". To this end, they promise a half-a-billion pound tax break for lower-income married couples, working out at £150 per annum.

I accept that my friends and I might be atypical. Maybe you know people who would legally bind themselves to another human being, for life, for an extra £150 a year? Perhaps you were contemplating leaving a loveless or abusive marriage, but underwent a change of heart on hearing about a possible £150 tax break? Anything is possible; but somehow, I doubt it. Even Mr Cameron seems to admit that he is offering nothing more than a token gesture when he tells us "it's not the money, it's the message".


Suggestions that Mr Cameron seems oblivious to how poor people actually live, think and behave seem to provoke accusations of class warfare. Let me therefore state, for the record, that I do not think it any more his fault that he spent his adolescence in the white tie and tails of Eton than that I spent the almost identical period in the ghastly brown-and-yellow stylings of Wyedean Comprehensive. I simply want to know that aspiring prime ministers have taken the trouble to educate themselves about the lives of all kinds of Britons, not only the sort that send messages with banknotes.



A 'centrist' is someone who's neither on the left, nor on the left.
by nicta (nico&#65312;altiva&#8228;fr) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 12:55:38 PM EST
the last paragraph is the best;-

David Cameron tells us that the Conservatives have changed, that they are no longer the "nasty party", that he wants the UK to be "one of the most family-friendly nations in Europe", but I, for one, am not buying it. He has repackaged a policy that made desperate lives worse when his party was last in power, and is trying to sell it as something new. I've never voted Tory before ... and they keep on reminding me why.


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:06:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Buenos Aires Herald: Historic first visit by a Russian premier

After 200 years of Argentine history, a woman President receives the first Russian president who visits our country," Fernández de Kirchner said. ...

At their meeting in 2008 in Moscow Medvedev, at the suggestion of Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, presented Mrs. Kirchner with a chapka, or fox fur hat. "She is not a woman. She is a sword. She is one of us. Buy her a chapka," Chávez reportedly told Medvedev ..

by FarEasterner on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:08:46 PM EST
the socialists are coming!

(hides under bed...)

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:03:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wrong choice, reds under bed...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:20:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Porn virus publishes web history of victims on the net

A new type of malware infects PCs using file-share sites and publishes the user's net history on a public website before demanding a fee for its removal.

The Japanese trojan virus installs itself on computers using a popular file-share service called Winni, used by up to 200m people.

It targets those downloading illegal copies of games in the Hentai genre, an explicit form of anime.

Website Yomiuri claims that 5500 people have so far admitted to being infected.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:17:54 PM EST
Joel Hodgson and Trace Bileau (sp) are currently trying to bring back the MST3K concept, calling it "Cinematic Titanic", apparently a live show in front of a live audience.  They were interviewed on Countdown yesterday.  Very sad.  Old men trying to relive their glory days, like seeing a saggy, baggy Hugh Heffer.  I hope the Monty Python boys don't try this.  So sad.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 01:58:23 PM EST
Hefner had glory days ? You mean there was a time when he wasn't a sleazy old man perving after girls he wasn't otherwise legally permitted to even look at.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:01:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, there's glory days and GLORY DAYS.  At least in his youth with his robe, pjs, and pipe he cut somewhat of a dashing figure.  Now he's just ... UGH!

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:07:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You mean you're not The Hef?

All this time...

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:30:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Go ahead, make fun of an old man with a bad back. (sob!)

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:37:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
'Nuff Said



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:34:32 PM EST
Pretty damn manic. I'm sure nowadays there'd be so many jump cuts to make it cleaner and less "sloppy". Dancers are all gymnast athletes these days

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:06:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What time's it at?  8.30 local?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 02:43:12 PM EST
yup, in half an hour.

Is is on espn ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:01:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, but it should be.  It'd certainly beat the shit out of baseball.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:21:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ooooh.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:26:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
double ewwww.

apple pie, drew.  bunting, in the sense of sacrifice to get the runner around, and colorful and patriotic, in the sense of national colours surrounding the field.  built on a diamond.

without armour. without timeouts.  without cheerleaders.

daily.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:36:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Long, boring, weak, slow, lame, lame, lame.

Daily.

Never liked apple pie.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:57:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well then, a peach Ty Cobbler for you.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 04:14:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You're not missing anything. brown keeps making sure he shoe-horns in his snappy soundbite; when done well it's a really slick way of making your point memorable. Unfortunately brown does it like he's jumping a track on a record, you can hear the join as a screeeeeee in his speech.

Cameron is good with the unattributable quote, the bloke said to me in a pub..... throws strangely round numbered statistics around. Sealing the deal ?? Ya gotta be joking.

Clegg is trying to sound like the adult, but he's really just the peppy kid who thinks he's better than the others, but is just a bit more boring.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:51:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tried it. ITV stream visible in Finland. Couldn't bear to watch it. Uuuugh....

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 04:16:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apparently its on C-Span in the US if you fancy the pain

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:56:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, I figured it would be.  Heading home now, so I'll catch up to the last half-hour or so and watch the rest later.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:58:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
spot the infiltrator?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:28:26 PM EST
{snigger}

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:37:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Aren't constipational rights protected?

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:43:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nope apparently they're spending all your taxes on laxatives.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:57:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]


"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char
by Melanchthon on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 04:20:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
of course, with this song, you've helped millions.  bear their burden.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 07:11:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dino returned last night to the scene of the crime, coming to finish off the donkey that he had killed the night before. The police had the idea of leaving the corpse around in the hope he would eat it instead of going off in search of new prey.
"Dino" ha completato il macabro pasto privilegiando le carni più consistenti e scartando quelle degli organi interni.
This is indeed what happened, with Dino focussing on the solid meat, and ignoring the internal organs. Tomorrow evening, Posina will hold a public meeting to reassure the public, and discuss what to do with him. This will probably involving setting off explosions and other loud noises to scare him away from inhabited areas, and, it this fails, capturing him and returning him to Trentino.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 04:28:21 PM EST
Not even close.  Clegg crushed Brown and Cameron in the polling after the debate.

I kind of doubt it translates into a big shift in the polls, though.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 06:26:53 PM EST
Yea, apparently the Lib Dems are like the cats that got the cream this morning.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 04:19:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
At least Clegg got more attention from viewers than Brian Paddick did in the London Mayoral Debate. Cameron and Brown must have been really awful last night if a Lib Dem was allowed to steal the limelight.

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 04:41:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is grading the visuals, so it'll naturally come across as shallow, but anyway:

They weren't really awful.  Brown came across as the worst to me, in terms of visuals, although I thought he did well trying to focus on the economy and public services.  He didn't look good attacking Cameron.  Veterans of American presidential debates would recognize Brown as being pretty desperate almost immediately.

Cameron did fairly well until they got to immigration.  He didn't seem at all willing to defend his cap on migration, and Clegg and Brown called him on it.  He also spent much of the debate with this deer-in-the-headlights look on his face that was pretty weird.  He also never looked into the camera.

Clegg was easily the best, having now watched it.  He was relaxed, he defended his policies very well, and he hammered Brown and Cameron exactly as you'd want him to -- not in a nasty way, but in an "Aren't you tired of these clowns and their lies?" way.  He also looked, far and away, like the most comfortable and likable one.

I'd give Brown a C, Cameron a B-, Clegg an A.

I thought he did very well.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 06:34:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
...adding: One criticism for all of them.  They all went way overboard on the anecdotes.  "I met a guy in blahblahblah" -- it's fine if the anecdote is highly relevant, but all three had clearly listened to advisers who'd taken tactics from American debates and amped them up to 11.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 06:48:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]


"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson
by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 06:33:37 AM EST
so true

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 08:50:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Apple iPad Printing Secret - PCWorld

For every flaw in Apple's iPad, there's a fix just waiting to be found.

Now, I'm not talking about problems like those Wi-Fi woes that plagued people during the iPad's early days; Apple itself offered up a solution there. I'm talking about the iPad's most central limitations -- the common functions that, for whatever reason, Apple decided not to address.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 07:28:58 AM EST


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