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UK election open thread 3

by IdiotSavant Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 09:19:08 AM EST

As requested.

Only two weeks to go... can we take the stress?


Display:
It's hard to stay optimistic in the face of the press barrage.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 11:08:11 AM EST
the setup of the electoral system:

UK Polling Report

This is a regular poll for the election campaign, polling the same group of 57 Lab vs Con marginal seats where the Conservatives need a swing of between 5% and 9%. In other words, these are not the narrowest marginals, they are comparatively distant marginals, the ones that would make the difference between the Conservatives being the largest party in a hung Parliament, and the Conservatives having a decent majority. To get a majority of 1, the Conservatives would need to take about half these seats, and be roughly equal with Labour in support (previous rounds of MORI's marginal polling are here and here.

The latest voting intention figures here are CON 32%(-6), LAB 36%(-5), LDEM 23%(+12). The swing in these seats is now 5%. In comparison, Ipsos MORI's monthly GB poll had a swing from Labour to the Conservatives of 3.5%, so even beneath the Lib Dem surge, the Conservatives still seem to be performing slightly better in their Labour held target seats.

The Ashcroft money is making a difference. The Tories look right now to have momentum in marginals and to be heading for a narrow majority...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 11:30:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe, but in polling all of the labour/con marginals they are ignoring that the Cons need to take seats from the lib dems, which is absolutely not going to happen now. In fact I imagine that the lib dems are gonna steal seats from both sides.

So, pessimism is appropriate if you want a labour win. But an outright tory victory, even one that could be supported in alliance with the Ulster unionists, is becoming ever more remote.

So, as somebody who wanted both labour and conservatives to lose, I'm happy.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 07:22:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
John Rentoul - Three-horse race, Labour third
Our ComRes poll for The Independent on Sunday and Sunday Mirror tomorrow has all the parties within sampling error of each other: 

Con 34%  (-1)
Lab 28%  (+3)
Lib Dem 29%  (+2)
Other 9%  (-4)
 (Change on since most recent ComRes poll, 21 April.)


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 11:35:26 AM EST
UK Polling Report: Swing calculator
Conservative	 258 seats (+60)
Labour		 268 seats (-88)
Liberal Democrats 93 seats (+31)
Others	9%	  13 seats (+1)
Northern Ireland  18 seats (nc)


The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 11:41:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
according to a couple of reporters sunday newspaper polls about to be released - but they seem to be inconsistent, but all read hung parliament.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 11:49:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Its certainly giving us a timely reminder of why we ditched FPP...
by IdiotSavant on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 07:37:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Election 2010 - Live coverage - General Election 2010
David Cameron outlines plans for electoral reform, including "postal primaries" to choose candidates

So we're trying to hand the Tory party over to the nutters are we Dave?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 12:02:07 PM EST
Sun Telegraph says Con 35 Lab 26 LD 31.
Sun Mirror    says Con 32 Lab 23 LD 32.
News of the World  Con 36 Lab 30 LD 23

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 12:03:58 PM EST
Needless to say the Murdoch poll looks a touch suspicious

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 12:05:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
At 8 points below everyone else, that makes it look in the poll of polls like the Clegg efect is over, its a big enough fall to maybe have it so that for a couple of days the news could be that the bubble has burst...

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 07:18:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Polls show hung parliament is moving closer - Channel 4 News

There are six polls out today, all but one of which puts the Conservatives on top, and all but one of which puts Labour in third place.

Ipsos/Mori is the outlier, putting the Liberal Democrats apparently in third place. Closer inspection, however, shows that this pollster fails to weight by past vote. Adjusting for this gives the Conservatives 34 per cent of the vote, the Liberal Democrats 32 per cent and Labour 23 per cent.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 08:44:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
CORRECTION : was Sunday People not Sunday Mirror that has Con 32, Lab 23 LD 32.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 12:14:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Disobey on the 6th of May< Beau Bo D'Or
I am NOT advocating one specific party. I am advocating not voting the way Rupert Murdoch wants us to. Please do not make this a one party campaign.

I was emailed by White Rabbit who suggested a couple of election graphics for blogs and blog sidebars. Happy to oblige.

Update. I've replaced the first image with my preferred size for this blog but I've left the smaller blog size below it. You can click either image for one 800px wide.

(Copied onto my space to save his bandwidth)



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 01:13:00 PM EST
... that makes you unrealistically non-Atlanticist.

??? I think. Last I saw someone being unrealistically non-Atlanticist, it was for advocating the policy that would please the present US government (abandoning the Trident), so its a bit of a slippery thing.


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:38:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
New Statesman - The right hand of God

In May 2008, a triumphant-looking Nadine Dorries, the Conservative MP for Mid-Bedfordshire, adorned newspaper front pages when she launched a campaign to restrict abortion rights. Aided by those who called themselves Christian "fundamentalists", the Tory backbencher was championed by the right-wing press for standing up against "the abortion industry". Dorries and her allies eventually lost the campaign to reduce the legal time limit for abortion, but they were undeterred. This was always going to be a long-drawn-out battle. And they had God on their side.

You could be forgiven for thinking that the David Cameron project has been striking in its unwillingness to say much about faith. None of the inner circle of Cameron, George Osborne, Andy Coulson and Steve Hilton is regarded as particularly religious, and avoiding the subject is part of the Tory detoxification project. Yet there are signs that a change is afoot.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 01:17:18 PM EST
Here is the long quotation from one funny guidebook on London published recently in Russia:

"It's very much possible that old thesis that history is not a science but ideology especially suitable for England.

Here is my advice - in conversations with certain Englishmen don't forget about "strong nationalist feelings in Englishmen". So don't mention that Eskimos were the first inhabitants of the island. And don't mention German heritage as well.

Remember - the average Englishman is very nice man.. however knowledge of foreign languages and European history is rather patchy. So many Englishmen still think they are if not at outright war with Germany (and much hated by real British patriots Europe) then they have just ceasefire. France is very negatively viewed and recently Russia as well.

Once again, remember that England is not Europe. It's only England and that's all. Always was, always will be. Take into consideration that average Englishmen were taught history in different way from your school textbooks.

Historical knowledge in England was shaped mainly by Mr Churchill... According to him history of England started right with Julius Caesar, "the first Briton". Meaning - no Eskimos and other Celts, British empire is rightful heiress of Roman empire. Nothing less, nothing more.

Following after Caesar 1000 years (with various "German" elements) mention only at your risk.

...

And in the end a couple of useful warnings.

1.    Better not to risk to laud a. Germany b. France c. Ireland d. Spain e. US f. Israel. Other countries (including Britain) are also not to be commended. You can admire only England but exercise some caution. For example in London you can laud South England only. Never ever "barbaric" Northern regions of England (we did not mention Scotland at all!)  
2.    Don't ask Englishmen what they think about Vladimir Vladimirovich or Boris Abramovich. They don't think anything particular - 100% sure they would hear these names for the first time.
3.     Who were Brezhnev, Khruschev, Gorbachev or even Yeltsin average English person does not know as well. And does not want to know. However some (very few) heard something about Putin VV. He is labeled as so called Russian hitler (hitler is nickname for any European or foreign politician).
4.    There are four Russian words all Englishmen know - "KGB", "communism", "Joseph Stalin" and "balalaika".

As you can see it's very, very conservative nation"

This quote probably offtopic but if it's true it's not surprising why Murdoch owned media outlets flourish in UK. Especially Daily Mail which seem to publish only fiction.

Otherwise I was surprised a bit by Cleggmania. Not entirely as the same guidebook explain in details that average Londoners like only what is hot at the moment (not was hot last year or even last week). Just look at the British music charts which tend to have new leader every Saturday.

So Cameron fell victim to the capricious English weather to the great delight of left wing press and prince of darkness, Lord Mandelson, who surely will retain business portfolio and spin doctor practice. It's very unlikely that Clegg will ever risk his left wing support by alliance with Cameron. Lib Lab alliance is more feasible with some painful purges on both sides.

by FarEasterner on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 03:44:45 PM EST

He is labeled as so called Russian hitler (hitler is nickname for any European or foreign politician).

Funny how the Russians also think "don't trust anything written in English about France, Europe or Russia :)

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 06:12:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tory 'Black farmer' rejects BNP at hustings - Channel 4 News

The campaign in the Wiltshire seat of Chippenham is being overshadowed by a row over whether the British National Party (BNP) candidate should join hustings debates, writes Katie Razzall.

To invite the BNP or not to invite the BNP - that is the question in Chippenham. The incredibly close fight in this new Wiltshire seat is being diverted by an argument over whether the BNP candidate should be invited to hustings.

The 'Black Farmer', as he's known, is the Tory candidate for Chippenham. This fedora-wearing sophisticate and successful sausage manufacturer, Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones, refuses to share a platform with the BNP. He told me "this is a point of principle, they've got no mandate here and I don't want to legitimise them".



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 05:29:49 PM EST
Independent: Can Caroline Lucas change British politics for ever?
It would be the most radical change of all, in this election in which "change" is the buzzword. It would bring Britain into line with the rest of Europe, at long last. It may be about to happen. Yet it's creeping up on us, hardly noticed in the country at large.

Britain may be about to get its first Green MP. Thirty years after the German Greens, Die Grünen, brought about the biggest real shift in post-war European politics by putting the environment on the political agenda for the first time alongside the economy, health and education, the UK may be about to play catch-up, and let a whiff of radicalism into the corridors of power.

In Brighton Pavilion, the most raffish constituency in that most raffish of seaside resorts, Caroline Lucas, leader of the Green Party of England and Wales, is the bookies' odds-on favourite to be elected to Parliament on 6 May. If she succeeds, she will end the remarkable anomaly by which Britain remains the only major country in Europe which has never had Green MPs in its national legislature.

by IdiotSavant on Sat Apr 24th, 2010 at 11:27:31 PM EST
Guardian - David Miliband - You've punished us enogh over Iraq

He argues that one of the main reasons for the rise of anti-politics is that "people feel politics isn't about their lives" - but as he well knows, anti-politics is about all sorts of other things too: expenses, peerages, non-doms, the Iraq war. Strikingly, the latter got only the most passing of mentions in this week's debate and yet there are still scores of people who feel so betrayed by it that they won't vote Labour. "I met some guy in Soho yesterday, when we were launching the Labour lesbian and gay manifesto. And I said to him, 'Look, you've punished us enough about Iraq, all right? So don't start punishing yourself.'

"Some people feel very, very strongly about it, and I respect that. There are people who resigned from the government because of Iraq. But what on earth is the point of punishing yourself or punishing the country for Iraq given that the alternative government, the Tories, also voted for it?"

What does he mean ? Who has been punished ? Where ? I would have crawled over broken glass to see those floggings. He's talking drivel. We went to war based on a lie, or a series of lies, intended to allow us to support bush come what may. Several very senior people knew about those lies. Based on those lies, Britain went to war and, aside from iraqis who may or may not matter very much to the public, British soldiers lives were lost. Based on a lie. Lies that were known and deliberately fabricated and propagated by senior people in the Labour party.

This is tantamount to a conspiracy to commit murder and defraud the British government of revenue that would be better spent elsewhere. Why are these people not identified and facing court proceedings and very long sentences ?

then and only then will the Labour party be considered de-contaminated of Iraq. When the NuLab tendency are exposed and expunged as being factional entryists as alien to the values of the Labour party as the Militant Tendency in the 80s, will Labour be de-contaminated of Iraq. Until then, they haven't been punished at all. So go f... yourself Miliband, you war-mongering scumbag. You haven't even begun to earn the right to beg my foregiveness.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 07:35:19 AM EST
Punished them enough?

If I wasn't going to vote against them before, Id be voting against them just for that.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 08:54:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
FiveThirtyEight.com: Is the Lib-Dem Surge For Real? (Part 2: Target Seats)
If the swing manifests in marginal consituencies where the Lib Dems have an existing base of support upon which to build, they could pick up quite a number of seats. However, if the swing simply pulls away support from one of the larger parties in seats where the Lib Dems have no real shot of victory, the upshot will be for the Tories or Labour.

Now then, onto the seats themselves. Regardless of whether the Liberal Democrats perform better or worse than their national numbers -- currently about 6.5 percent swing against Labour and 3 percent swing from the Conservatives-- in target marginals, a major concern is how relatively scarce their targets are, particularly targets that take advantage of what looks to be a a weakened Labour party.

...

Looking in the other direction, the Liberal Democrats have a significant number of potential Tory-held targets, including quite a number where Labour support is quite low.



The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 08:59:48 AM EST
Why the French want Nick Clegg to win - Telegraph Blogs
Woke up to the Today programme asking two London correspondents - one French, one American - what their countries thought of the election. The American, Stryker McGuire of Newsweek magazine, talked sensibly about of Washington's concern that the new government should be a decisive one with which Obama could do business. But it was Agnès Poirier of Le Nouvel Observateur who had me sitting up. The election was boring, she said - until Nick Clegg and the "Oh la la!" moment". THIS was exciting. And the French could breathe a sigh of relief: they'd been worrying about that Conservative who looked on Europe with such hostility winning the election - quel horreur - but now one of their own looked poised to triumph. With Nick Clegg playing a big role, Britain would be in Europe's arms and the UK may even join the euro down the line.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 09:04:43 AM EST
In the Telegraph, of course.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 09:08:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
'Fuck France' coming soon to an Air Strip One near you...

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 09:13:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why the French want Nick Clegg to win - Telegraph Blogs
For the sake of Britain, we must leave Europe.

Well I should say England really, because Scotland and Wales are just living on our subsidies they don't show any respect for our flag. We can't trust them as well and we should let them go.

Once I said that it is true that we can't like the North of England full of working class people poor and ignorant. It is the South of England and in particularly London who shines over this country.

Obviously in London you have all these districts full of immigrants, non-christian people who plague our country. Fortunately in some respectable part of it like Westminster people are smart and proper like us.

Why are we so few unfortunately? For god sake we have the Telegraph to represent us and open our minds on the dangers of the corrupt external World.



"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char
by Melanchthon on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 11:12:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Dear Ian Cowie...

Dear Ian,

I'm a bit confused by your article about hung Parliaments in the Telegraph, where you wrote:

The last time a British election failed to produce a decisive result, in February, 1974, the FTSE All Share Index - a broad measure of the stock market - fell nearly 15pc in a month and ended the year more than 50pc below where it began.

The piece even has a graph starting in January 1974 and going through to late 1974.

Why does this leave me confused? Well, I'm sure on most financial matters you know far more than me. But even I know that British share prices had been steadily dropping since early 1972.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 09:07:29 AM EST
BBC - Nick Robinson's Newslog: What Clegg is thinking
As I write this I am aware that this is precisely the sort of "poll based, what if" speculation that angers Gordon Brown. I'm told that Labour has asked the two other big parties to sign a joint letter to broadcasters criticsing them for covering the debates and the polls too much and claiming that the news bulletins had "failed to deliver the usual specialist examination of specific policy areas". The Lib Dems and the Tories have refused to sign. The BBC has yet to receive the letter.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 09:08:43 AM EST
Guardian: Nick Clegg warns Labour over third-place finish
Nick Clegg today warned that he would not prop up the government if Labour came third in the popular vote, and said reform of Britain's "potty" electoral system would be the condition of any deal with the Conservatives.

As another batch of opinion polls suggested a hung parliament is the likeliest result of the election, the focus of the campaign has shifted to talk of coalitions and the role of Clegg as the probable kingmaker.

In an interview on BBC1's Andrew Marr Show, Clegg said Gordon Brown would have no right to carry on "squatting" in Downing Street if Labour received fewer votes than both the Liberal Democrats and the Tories.

And he's right.  But OTOH, Labour may be more willing to carry through on electoral reform than the Tories.

And OTTH, I can't help but feel that the focus on Clegg as Kingmaker is missing an important question.  Surely if Clegg wins more votes than Labour, the question shouldn't be "who will Clegg support?", but "who will support Clegg?"

by IdiotSavant on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 10:07:30 AM EST
Guardian: Nick Clegg goes public on coalition - and looks to the Conservatives
Nick Clegg today signalled that he would speak to the Conservatives first about the formation of a minority government if Labour came third by share of the vote on 6 May, rejecting the constitutional convention that the prime minister should be allowed to try to form a government first.

The Liberal Democrat leader also made it explicit for the first time that electoral reform would be an unavoidable precondition of any coalition government as he insisted that Labour will have forfeited the right to govern if it comes third.

That's a rather interesting spin on constitutional convention there.  The uber-convention in Westminster systems is that the PM is the person who holds the confidence of Parliament.  Only if there is no clear candidate does the incumbent get the joy of putting themselves up for a vote.  

by IdiotSavant on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 07:04:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The convention that's now in place in Canada is that the party that has the most seats has the first right to form a government.

As to Clegg, I don't see how it benefits him or the Lib Dems to say something like this. Better to keep quiet about what you might do - that leaves more possibilities open to you, and has less chance of alienating a volatile electorate. If I were someone angry with Labour and looking at the Lib Dems, this statement would drive me back toward considering voting for Labour so they don't come in third.

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 08:57:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The convention that's now in place in Canada is that the party that has the most seats has the first right to form a government.

That's in cases where it is not clear who holds confidence.  A public agreement between parties provides the required clarity for a PM to be appointed.

As for Clegg, I guess he's responding to the Tories "vote Clegg, get Brown" message in the stupidest way possible.  He should leave the possibility of a progressive coalition open - but demand the premiership if he gets more votes than labour.

by IdiotSavant on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 09:26:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cameron's preferred coalition partners revealed! | And another thing...

A CONSERVATIVE Party spokesman, welcoming their latest "celebrity" endorsement, said: "There are a few policy differences between us and the Dalek Empire, but in terms of broad principle, we believe this is a race of ruthless, psychopathic, megalomaniac killing machines David Cameron can do business with."

A Dalek spokesman added: "Actually, we're a bit concerned about some of the more extreme elements of the Tory Party, but we think it is time for a change."



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 11:18:40 AM EST
@krishgm Griffin says he'd pay 50K per person to leave,

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 11:27:13 AM EST
FiveThirtyEight: Politics Done Right
Play around with one of the ubiquitous 'swingometers' that purport to forecast the number of seats in the House of Commons that will change hands pending the results of the United Kingdom's May 6th election, and you'll get the impression that the Labour party, which now controls Parliament, has a fairly large buffer zone before facing total Armageddon. According to BBC's calculator, for instance, an outcome of Conservatives 33 percent, the center-left Liberal Democrats 30 percent, and Labour 28 percent would still leave Labour with a plurality of 276 seats, although far short of the 326 they'd need to achieve a majority and avoid a hung parliament.

But these forecasts are based on a questionable assumption and may understate, perhaps substantially, the magnitude of gains that might be realized by the Tories and by the LibDems. In particular, they are based on the idea of a uniform national swing, i.e., that if Labour finishes 7 points below their standing from the previous election in 2005, their share of the vote will drop by 7 points in each individual district (better known as 'constituencies' in the U.K.).


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 25th, 2010 at 06:15:27 PM EST
It's a reasonable, in fact persuasive argument, which I'd suspected would happen but had no way of expressing that. But it is somewhat spoiled by him trying to be too precise.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 01:20:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Murdoch Chronicles: Is Rupert Pissed at James?
James, and his number two in London, Rebekah Brooks--a key confidant of the Murdoch children who was also involved in the confrontation with Kelner--had convinced the elder Murdoch, long sympathetic to Labour Party leader, Gordon Brown, to let them endorse the conservative leader, David Cameron, in the race. Alarmed by Cameron's fall in the polls, the two have pressured their papers to pull out all the stops in an effort to aid the Conservatives and undermine Labour and the Lib-Dems.

"It is my job to see that Cameron fucking well gets into Downing Street," proclaimed Tom Newton Dunn, political editor of the Sun, to a group of journalists from rival papers, recently.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 06:54:31 AM EST
Can Labour's Twitter celebrity backers really swing your vote? | Technology | guardian.co.uk

It won't make any difference to the election - at least, not one that you can measure. But according to a new analysis it seems - prepare yourself - that the Labour Party (remember them?) has more celebrities with more followers on Twitter who have made their political leanings clear.

And, er, that's it.

If it were summer then we'd feel that it must be the silly season, but it's not - it's the election season, which matches it for silliness.

The list is in the image above, and reproduced below for added clickiness if you want to follow said celebrities.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 09:44:52 AM EST
Ow.ly - image uploaded by @scottgdouglas
(by photographer Michael Schofield via his FB page)


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 11:04:05 AM EST
 - laughs -

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 01:12:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian/ICM: Con 33% , LD 30% , Lab 28%

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 02:21:06 PM EST
It'll be interesting to see if there's any movement in the next couple of days as people digests Nick's idiot statement about supporting the tory scum if Labour come 3rd.

that may be the principled thing to do, but it was the wrong time to say it.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 02:47:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
this statement probably just a pressure tactics to evict squatter from Downing 10. I don't see him as deputy to Cameron - LibDems may end up like German Social Democrats. As for LibLab coalition I think main problem is strong allergy in LibDem ranks to particular Labour figures - they may have to go. But Labour may also extract the high price from Clegg, it's just unlcear what price it will be. And another reason for such talks - to keep press attention which should help Lib Dems on 6 May.
by FarEasterner on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:39:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - SNP hits cash target in BBC leaders' debate legal bid

The Scottish National Party says it has raised £50,000 to proceed with legal action over the prime ministerial debate on BBC One on Thursday.

The SNP will lodge the necessary papers instigating the action at Edinburgh's Court of Session on Tuesday.

The party said it was not trying to stop the broadcast but it wanted an SNP politician included "for balance".

Labour, the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats said the SNP was more interested in grabbing headlines.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 03:02:35 PM EST
I agree they should be part of a televised debate. But as they are not a party with a vested interest in the United Kingdom, they no role in a  debate about the future government of the United Kingdom.

The debate that should occur is about Scotland. Under devolution there is sufficient autonomy that their interests deserve a separate debate. All serious parties in Scotland should be invited to debate those. Similarly with Wales and N Ireland. But I won't watch it, cos it's nothing to do with me. And I would deeply resent the leaders of some tu'penny-ha'ppenny single issue party coming into a debate about the UK with parties attempting to represent the whole of the UK and trying to pretend they have anything constructive to say about governance of the United Kingdom. They don't.

And also, I think the point about excluding minor parties is to ensure that we don't end up with the trivia like UKIP or the BNP standing alongside proper politicians.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 03:37:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Now you're being separatist. If your sentiment is at all reflective of the general sentiment in England I think the UK has a serious cohesion problem.

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 03:59:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, wrong way around. They are the separatists, my attitude is that if they don't like it, the exit's over there. Cos one thing that history tells us is that if there is a significant separatist sentiment amongst a population, then denying that democratically-expressed sentiment in a desire to enforce a resented unity only brings about more vehement expressions of separatism.

If you love them, let them go.

Frankly, such a thing is inevitable anyway. I am very grateful that Clegg is doing so well at the moment so that the UK might get PR before it happens cos under FPTP England is a conservative stitch-up.


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 04:24:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Helen:
But as they are not a party with a vested interest in the United Kingdom, they no role in a  debate about the future government of the United Kingdom.

Just that Scotland is and has been for centuries one entity of that "United Kingdom", England only being the other. Advocating an end to the Union is playing a part in the debate about the future government of the UK.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 04:50:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The future government of the UK is determined by those politicians who aim to represent all of the people of the UK, a claim that nobody in the SNP or Plaid could possibly make.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:10:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You really think the Tories represent much more than the wealthier part of England? How far are you going to go in ruling out parties?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:15:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hmm, here we're beginning to tease out who a "representative" represents. Let's stay with the fiction that an MP represents all people in their constituency or that, if they even stand, it is their intention to do so.

The 3 major parties have candidates in nearly every constituency in Great Britain. Thus all three can be said to have an intention to govern for the people of Great Britain. The SNP won't stand in england, or Wales. It wouldn't make any sense. Yet this shows they have no view on the governance of the country as a whole. They are a regional party, who should be engaged with regionally. The SNP have nothing to say about Britain beyond "abolish it".

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:20:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Doesn't work. The current electoral system is entirely based on constituency MPs who represent their constituents (and the government of the UK is drawn from among them on a majority basis). If that's a fiction, so is the notion that the Tories (or even NooLab) represent the UK as a whole.

If people elect MPs whose view is that the current constitutional arrangements should change, it's not your right to say they should have no voice. It's not in your power either, there's nothing you can do about it.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:31:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If people elect MPs whose view is that the current constitutional arrangements should change, it's not your right to say they should have no voice. It's not in your power either, there's nothing you can do about it.

There are several responses to this.

I never said it was my decision or my power. I was just responding to a general request for opinions. I gave my opinion. I made no demands of respect or legal force. You are perfectly at liberty to disagree with it, as you do. But what you say doesn't make me wrong, it's still my opinion.

People elect all sorts of MPs. Independents, Plaid, SNP. If they want to organise a televised debate about the Constitutional arrangements of the UK, I'm sure it would be a useful thing to have. Except, of course, both of the countries seem to have different priorities, each of their nationalist parties are different in view from each other, while the Welsh and Scottish Labour parties have totally different views on their respective country's devolution. So who would represent them ? It makes no sense for there to be a national televised debate about each of these local matters.

Just as I'm sure that regional voters were outraged at how much London regional and Mayoral politics were discussed as if they were national issues.

Any more than scottish and Welsh voters care how voters in England have fallen deep into the West Lothian trap Tam Dalyell spent decades warning us about.

They aren't discussing the constitution of the UK, they are discussing how to approach considering new constitutional arrangements. That's their affair. Just as the W Lothian problem is England's affair.

I'm quite sure that devolution will result in a fracturing of the United Kingdom. And I'm sure that things will change in how we are organised politically. But I don't want to hear politicians trying to score points off each other about it. I want good ideas and a bipartisan approach, because it involves all of us.

If it becomes party political it'll be  mess that ends up in the worst of all possible outcomes, as is usual in the UK. Keep the pols out of it.


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 09:25:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I was avoiding more obvious "opinion" bits like

Helen:

some tu'penny-ha'ppenny single issue party

It does seem to me you are making judgements about constitutional issues, all the same. And avoiding my point about the Tories and NooLab not representing the interests of the whole of the UK. It's been thirty years now of government in favour of the interests of southern England, the former industrial areas and the far-flung corners being hung out to dry. The wish of the SNP to participate in a debate where they would put forward the all the same weighty proposition of an end to the Union seems to me perfectly legitimate and at an appropriately "all-UK" level of discourse - these are certainly not "local matters".

Now if we're just talking about how to organise a debate on the telly, then no doubt it is difficult to include every party. But that is also how the majors go on being majors. And the UK debates, featuring the Three Great Men the population is summoned to choose from, have the drawback that they contribute yet further to the presidentialisation of the premiership, which has been going on fast enough under Thatcher and Blair. It becomes a presidential election that doesn't speak its name and is not organised as such, but by an opaque and eminently unfair FPTP electoral system. To my mind, that's a more dangerous tendency than devolution. So I'm not in favour of these TV debates anyway.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 04:02:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, now we're rocking. these are more interesting directions to take and I think I more or less agree with you on each and every one (which may make for dull conversation).

I might suggest that the sitaution is worse than you suggest. NuLab/tory don't even represent the south east anymore; more that they assume that the interests of the economy as a whole are tied up in the interests of the City, a relationship I've always said was inverse. So their primary interest is in ensuring the good regard of international financiers. Which is rather akin to going swimming in shark infested waters and covering yourself in chum to please them.

Totally agree about the Presidential system, but the purpose of a Prime Minister these days is to be the pr man, the front man, the salesman. the days of being an effective manager and sending your Ministers out to explain the agreed upon policy are long gone, however much it made for better government. Too many egos involved (see my earlier comment about the suitability of successful politicians for the responsibilities they hold).

Frankly, nobody watched Vince Cable, Alistair Darling and the George Osborne slug it out, however much it made interesting policy wonk tv. And the others are all dull apparatchiks you'd pay to avoid.

The TV debate served a purpose. It elevated clegg and de-stabilised Cameron. Brown was out of his depth on tv, just as he's been out of his depth in number 10.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 05:51:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Helen:
proper politicians

What? According to you, there are any?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 04:52:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Compared with the mentality of the pond life representing BNP or UKIP, then yeah, loads of 'em.

Actually, moving on from that, there are many honourable politicians in the country, both professional as well as those who are unpaid, who are performing valuable service. Even in Westminster ...even Conservatives. And I remain a big fan of the Welsh Labour Party under Morgan

My beef is that the ones who invariably end up being the big cheese decision makers are usually exactly the wrong sorts of people who should be gifted such responsibility.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:15:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Helen:
there are many honourable politicians in the country, both professional as well as those who are unpaid, who are performing valuable service.

You're going to get quoted on that, because the general tone of your remarks on the political class is quite other.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:18:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just so long as I can point out that I continued  thus;-

My beef is that the ones who invariably end up being the big cheese decision makers are usually exactly the wrong sorts of people who should be gifted such responsibility.


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:22:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian/ICM poll: Labour support could fall below 20% | Politics | The Guardian

Labour is battling to avoid a disastrous third place in next week's election, according to the latest Guardian/ICM poll. It suggests Labour support - 28% in today's poll - has not yet hit bedrock and could fall below 20%.

The ICM figures show the Liberal Democrats' surge is sustained, with all three party scores identical to last week's Guardian/ICM poll. The Conservatives retain a narrow three-point lead on 33% ahead of the Lib Dems on 30%. Labour is close behind on 28%.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 03:14:50 PM EST
The point about the collapse is worth noting, but the tories are just as likely to suffer one.

As I've kept saying, people are sick of NuLab but fearful of the tories. So in any constituency where there's a possibility of pushing the LDP over the top, I imagine it will be attempted.

However much I want Labour to lose, I don't want them destroyed, although if NuLab could be destroyed I'd be happy for that. but the party I want to lose utterly is the tories. And so it's them I want squeezed.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 03:41:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have this horrible feeling though that the Lesson Learned by Labour after the upcoming debacle is that they hadn't moved far enough to the Right/Centre.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 03:44:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I agree. NuLab, which I earlier denounced as an entryist faction, has become the default version of "Labour". They are the British Democratic Party of the Clinton era, aka Conservative-lite.

just as I notice that politicians are more religious than their constituents, they are more right wing and authoritarain than them as well.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 04:17:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A Labour Liberal marginal seat in Bristol has had 2800 postal votes sent out with the candidates for the wrong constituency  on.  The council will re-issue before the election, but  people will be on holiday/ away on election day. So no matter the result, it looks like there will be a legal challenge on that result.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 04:11:07 PM EST
If it's anything like that Birmingham constituency, all of the ballots will have been filled in with the same handwriting anyway.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 04:25:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The more I think about it, the more strongly I believe Clegg erred in indicating he wouldn't coalition with a third-place Labour Party.

The reason is that it reduces his options when talking to Cameron. The #1 thing Lib Dems need to get out of the talks is true electoral reform, particularly a kind of proportional representation that meaningfully ends the flaws of first-past-the-post.

Cameron has no desire to do that, since it might mean the Conservatives never hold power on their own again. So it's in his interest to offer Clegg some lesser form of electoral reform that doesn't include PR. Cameron can give it as a "take it or leave it" offer, knowing that Clegg already publicly ruled out a coalition with a third-place Labour.

Clegg would thus be at the disadvantage, with few better alternatives. He could say he won't coalition at all with the Tories and instead not vote against a budget or a confidence motion and allow Cameron to head a minority government in exchange for a few things, but that's a weak outcome and risks a big step backward for the Lib Dems at the next election, which would likely come in two years' time.

Labour seems more likely to accept some more radical form of electoral reform, especially in their desperate situation. So I fail to see what Clegg has gained here.

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 04:59:39 PM EST
OK, this is much better, and suggests Lib Dems saw the same problem I'd identified:

Nick Clegg: I could work with Labour, just not Gordon Brown | Politics | The Guardian

Nick Clegg hurriedly revised the Liberal Democrat post-election negotiating position today by insisting that he had not ruled out a possible deal with Labour in a hung parliament. However, he said that if Labour came third in share of the vote - with polls suggesting that is a distinct possibility - he did not believe that Gordon Brown could remain as prime minister.


And the world will live as one
by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 09:32:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ive been seeing various MPs saying "How dare the LibDems say they can chose our leader" in an attempt to get their base wound up and out to vote

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 06:43:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As if a Labour leader who ended up needing to go into coalition could survive post-election.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 06:50:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What's Cameron's life expectancy if the Tories don't get a majority?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 06:53:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
difficult to say. The general; trend here is the same as the US one, the public are tending soft-ish left and the pols are tending right.

So, when faced by a problem, their default reaction so to go further right. Given that the tories have tried fake "compassionate conservatism", a position which was already causing muttering amongst the backwoods nutters, I'd suggest that they're gonna probably drop that and go for a red meat conservative as much in the mould of their Blessed Margaret as possible.

Frankly, I don't care what they do so long as they don't get in power. My fear is that Labour will do the same. Rather than burn out the NuLab virus wherever its fetid tentacles have corrupted, Blairism will emerge refreshed after flirting with Brownism.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 09:03:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Election 2010 - Live coverage - General Election 2010
A ComRes poll for ITV News and the Independent puts the Conservatives on 32%, down two points on yesterday, while the Lib Dems are up two on 31% and Labour are unchanged on 28%


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:32:42 PM EST
UK Polling Report: Swing Calculator
Conservative		236 seats (+38)
Labour			273 seats (-83)
Liberal Democrats	110 seats (+48)
Others	9%		 13 seats (+1)
Northern Ireland	 18 seats (nc)


The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 05:39:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lib Dems still riding the sentiment wave | Fishburn Hedges

The graphs below show our analysis of positive social media sentiment during the last two weeks of the campaign.   A couple of really interesting points emerge which start to shed light on what's really going on in terms of social media support.

First up you can see that the Lib Dems were well behind in terms of positive mentions but were trending upwards in the days before the debate.  This is very likely because there was increased speculation about the fact that the Lib Dem leader was likely to perform well. 

Then - whoa! - Clegg gets the party a massive spike on the day of the debate itself.

The graph resettles at a higher level than it was before, higher than Labour which had previously outperformed its own polling in terms of social media sentiment share.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 at 06:50:32 PM EST
The intellectual heavyweights weigh in on PR

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 06:52:21 AM EST
@faisalislam IFS critique Cameron's dismissal of LibDem tax plans from first debate ---  Tory plan is net giveaway of £3bn

@faisalislam Highly sceptical about Labour and Conservative manifestos on tax:  History suggests tax rises more than two big parties want to admit

@faisalislam 'LiBDems slightly less bad than Conservatives and Labour': IFS !!

@faisalislam Key fact: between Apr 2011 and MArch 2015:Labour need £51bn of cuts to unprotected areas; Cons £64bn cuts, LibDems £47bn cuts : IFS

@faisalislam IFS: Of those cuts, Cons manifesto only outlines 18% of nec cuts (£52bn unexplained), Lab only 13% (£44bn unexpln), LibD 26% (£35bn unexpln)

@faisalislam No more tax rises?? Lab needs further £7bn by 2016/17 ... Con needs further £3bn (reimposing half the NI move) ... LibD dont need more rises

@faisalislam Departmental limits will be cut on avg till 2015  Labour -- 3.1% real cuts per year ... LibDem: 2.8 per cent cuts .... Cons 4% cuts

@faisalislam Cons will have to cut one pound in every five of their 'unprotected' spending, LibD 1/11 pounds, Lab 1 in 5 if 4 yrs health/schools protn

@faisalislam IFS:  Conservatives will have biggest public sector cuts since Second World War

@faisalislam IFS: Labour and Liberal Democrats will have biggest public sector departmental cuts since IMF in 1976



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 06:59:51 AM EST
`Vote rigger' Jamshed Khan joins Tory campaign - Times Online

A CONSERVATIVE activist charged with trying to rig the voting system in the last general election has been campaigning with shadow cabinet ministers to help the party win a key marginal seat.

Jamshed Khan resigned from the Conservative party after police launched an investigation into vote rigging, but is now back campaigning for the party in the Bradford West constituency.

Khan, 65, from Bradford, West Yorkshire, along with three other defendants, faces a charge of conspiracy to defraud the electoral registration officer. They all deny the charge and are due to appear at Leeds crown court in June.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 08:05:43 AM EST
The Media Blog: UK media bias: BBC and Channel 4 beat Sky and ITV on political balance

Sky News displays the strongest political bias of any major UK news broadcaster, according to a survey conducted by TheMediaBlog.co.uk, the full results of which will be published later this week.

Nearly two-thirds of respondents (64 per cent) said Sky News displays a clear pro-Conservative bias in its reporting. In total, 34.5 per cent of respondents said Sky News displays a "strong Conservative" bias, while 29.3 said the channel shows "some Conservative" bias. One per cent of respondents thought Sky News displays a pro-Liberal Democrat bias, there was zero suggestion of any support for Labour and only 9.1 per cent of respondents said Sky News shows no overall bias.

The second strongest bias, indentified by the survey of 1,054 respondents, was on ITV News - also believed to be pro-Conservative.

In total, 11.3 per cent said ITV shows a "strong Conservative" bias and 17.5 said it shows "some Conservative" bias. However, the bias was less clear-cut as 6.2 per cent of respondents said they believe ITV is actually pro-Lib Dem. The channel also fared better than Sky with the 28.9 per cent of respondents who said it shows no overall bias, and nearly a third (32 per cent) saying they are unsure. 

Channel 4 and the BBC meanwhile were well ahead - seen as being largely impartial on balace.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 10:16:03 AM EST
Normally I would post pieces of their energy policy here, but  This piece is just too stunning to ignore

Ukip answers questions about its science policy | General Election 2010 | Science | guardian.co.uk

Should Britain be at the forefront of research in these areas? What benefits do you believe such research will bring for society?

Wherever stem cells can be obtained by means other than the killing of very small children, it is ethical only to obtain the stem cells by means that do not involve the loss of little lives. On this basis, there is no reason why Britain should not play a leading part in stem cell research.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 10:23:08 AM EST
Syntax FAIL™

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 10:24:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I had to read that twice before i could believe what I was seeing. That's hysterically funny.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 10:44:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well The rest of the article isn't much more sane.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 11:21:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How good is Ukip's science policy? | Martin Robbins | Science | guardian.co.uk

Ukip, the self-styled "party of the pub", is fielding 500 candidates in next week's general election in an attempt to capitalise on gains made at elections for the European parliament last year, although polling suggests the Eurosceptic party is unlikely to make a breakthrough in Westminster.

Not particularly noted for its progressive views, the party performed badly in our European election assessment last year, having adopted a policy of climate change denial that puts it at odds with the scientific community and has seen Ukip MEPs engage in a series of rants on the subject in the European parliament.

And that's just the start of the party's problems.

Ukip's manifesto contains a series of bizarre policy announcements on science, ranging from a rejection of the Commons Science and Technology Select Committee's findings on homeopathy, to a series of statements about "climate extremists"



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 12:04:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are a lot of batshit insane parties in the EP, but for sheer lack of self-awareness, they are none to second... it's the real Monster Raving Loony Party.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 01:24:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tory PPC for N Ayrshire, Philip Lardner, suspended for "deeply offensive and unacceptable" comments about homosexuality.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 10:23:52 AM EST
Another day, another slip of the ugly party's mask...

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 10:25:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was gonna post this in OT, but ti seem appropriate for this point. Aside from the sily cons are from Mars liberals from venus tick, this is actually an interesting article.

Guardian - Aditya chakrabortty - A morality check for British politicians

That "crazy stopping point" - beyond which, no matter how hard they try, left and right can only agree to disagree - has come up a few times in this election. Think of Chris Grayling's suggestion that B&B owners should be allowed to turn away gay couples - a remark that aroused outrage from liberals in politics and in the media, but which failed to topple the Tory from the frontbench. Or consider David Cameron's proposal for a tax break for married couples, loved by the Daily Mail but derided by Lib Dem Nick Clegg as "patronising drivel that belongs in the Edwardian age".

As politicians, Clegg and Cameron are more alike than they are different: close in age and background, both pragmatic rather than ideological and in agreement on many big issues. Yet on an apparently small one (a tax credit worth £3 a week) they were miles apart. How come? And how could the Tory leader - for all his youth, his Converses and his Radiohead albums - come across as so illiberal?

The answer may be simple: when it comes to morality, Conservatives are from Mars and lefties are from Venus. They struggle to agree - on the importance of marriage, say, or the wrongness of homosexuality - because they do not share the same basic sense of right and wrong.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 10:51:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No shit Sherlock...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 01:27:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Election 2010 - Live coverage - General Election 2010
A Conservative candidate has been suspended for describing gay people as "not normal" on his website, the party says. The comments made by Philip Lardner, running for the seat of North Ayrshire and Arran, were branded "deeply offensive and unacceptable" by a Tory spokeswoman.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 11:24:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Basildon boxer to fight election as 'None Of The Above'

Voters in parts of Essex will see a line on their ballot papers enabling them to vote for "None Of The Above".

But it is NOT a new official way of abstaining - it is the new name of the ex-boxer formerly known as Terry Marsh.

He has changed his name by deed poll to "None Of The Above X", and is standing as a parliamentary candidate in South Basildon and East Thurrock.

Electoral law bans parties from using the name, but not individuals.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 11:20:04 AM EST
he should have re-named himself "Nun of the Above" and then campaigned in a habit.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 11:37:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Having used an Elvis impersoantor to show how out of touch you are, do you really next want to remind  people how closely you were related to torturers

Labour calls in director of 24 for TV broadcast - Channel 4 News

The Hollywood director who made the hit TV series 24 is to take charge of Labour's next party election broadcast in an effort to revive their campaign.

Labour is getting help from Jack Bauer.

For its latest party election broadcast it has recruited Stephen Hopkins, the director of the hit TV series 24.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 12:36:41 PM EST
Times Online - Eureka Zone - WBLG: Secret memo tells Tory MPs not to sign up to cancer charities' campaigns

Cancer may be a party political frontline in election campaigns, but it appears that Conservative strategists are keen for the party to keep some distance from the specialists, scientists and campaigners involved with some of the countries biggest charities.

E-mails advising Conservative MPs and parliamentary candidates not to sign up to awareness campaigns run by charities including Cancer Research UK, Macmillan and Breast Cancer Campaign have been sent out. The ready-made responses - to be forwarded on by the MPs and candidates - were distributed to party members by the Conservatives' parliamentary resources unit (PRU), with the advisory: "Important note for members: Please do not sign up to this campaign."



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 05:06:41 PM EST
Yes, Prime Minister? | nick_clegg | lib_dems | liberal_democrats | Boulton & Co. | Sky News Blogs

So busy were the Liberal Democrats as the train pulled in to the station en route to Southampton, that they failed to spot this great photo opportunity.

If Nick Clegg thought he'd moved on from being asked if he wanted to be Prime Minister, Sky News cameraman Neil Morris wasn't about to let everyone forget the big hung parliament conundrum - who will Mr Clegg crown as Prime Minister.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 05:08:46 PM EST
Tonights PPB by the Tory Party, designed to scare people about a hung parliament features a hammer smashing a piggy bank 1:50 in if you look carefully, the piggy bank is full of US coins. Which are legal tender in Belieze....

if you really fancy the pain



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 06:55:33 PM EST
But unaccountable deals made behind closed doors is exactly how we're governed now. One of the biggest problems with working out who to punish over Iraq is that it was all shady deals. And no suggestion things would be different under the filth scum parasites tories.

Other thing to notice, there's a scene about 1:34 of the bloke talking with a Westminster embankment backdrop. One person in that crowd scene on the LH side is fuzzed out, I wonder why.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 04:23:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Looking its a couple, theyre probably not married so don't deserve to be in Davids sunny new Britain.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 05:40:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
good spot on the yank money. Is this widely known ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 04:23:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well I only watched it myself to check after  seeing it commented upon by the famous musician Mr William Bragg Esq.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 05:35:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Your democracy's spoiling my vote! « Cubik's Rube

This is going to be off-the-cuff, chaotic, and angry.

I posted this on Twitter earlier, and it got retweeted more than anything else I've ever said:

If I want the Lib Dems to win, I'm voting Lib Dem. If you're so scared of a hung parliament, maybe YOU shouldn't vote Conservative.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 09:01:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Now they're getting really laughably desperate

What the Lib Dems really think about children and pornography - Telegraph Blogs

Do you know where your 16 year-old is? If the Lib Dems get into power, your son or daughter could be starring in a porn film. Yes, that's right: the party of nice Mr Clegg is actually the party of choice for dirty old men. It seems anyone over 16 should be allowed to watch "Naughty Nurses' Lesbo Love", and even act in it.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 07:10:20 PM EST
That clean cut Mr Cameroon - nice to know the UK's moral probity is in such safe hands.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 at 07:35:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorry as I am to bring this up but Truth© must be told!

Clegg has been often seen to masticate in public.  And his wife was a notorious, self-declared, thespian during her school days.

Is this the kind of people you want in No. 10?

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 01:25:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Gordon Brown calls Labour voter 'bigoted' - Channel 4 News

Gordon Brown committed a major election gaffe today by describing an elderly voter as a "bigot".

Gordon Brown committed a major election gaffe today by describing an elderly voter as a "bigot".

After having a discussion with the life-long Labour voter Gillian Duffy in the street, Brown then got into his car to say: "You should never have put me with that woman. Whose idea was that? Sue's I think.

"Everything she said - she's just a bigoted woman."



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 07:53:25 AM EST
Brown to Duffy: go vote BNP.

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 08:31:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
well he's now been inside her house for 40 minutes grovelling/beating her senseless till she votes for him/ apologising

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 10:48:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The BBC is being careful to illustrate the story in an impartial and unbiased way.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 11:12:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
John Rentoul - The effect of Gillian Duffy
That's two big things that have happened in this election campaign. The first was a kind of double whammy, being the first debate and the media-public feedback loop in response to it.

The second is the instant fame of Gillian Duffy, whose day began with a simple errand, "I were going for a loaf of bread," when she saw a lot of police officers and thought that there might have been a car crash.

There soon was.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 12:33:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Unfortunately, Brown was right. She railed against Eastern European immigrants, then asked where they flock from.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Apr 29th, 2010 at 06:40:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Jon Slattery: Private Eye spoofs anti-Clegg Tory press
I thought Private Eye wouldn't be able to resist spoofing the way the Tory press has gone gunning for Nick Clegg. It doesn't disappoint today.
Can you spot the difference with the real thing


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 07:57:48 AM EST
UKIP leader backing Philip Hollobone - Northants ET
The leader of the UK Independence Party has backed Kettering's Conservative candidate and urged UKIP voters to vote for him. Lord Pearson praised Philip Hollobone's 'brave' views on Europe, immigration and banning the burkha and promised UKIP members would campaign for his election.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 08:03:35 AM EST
this is just what I think of Ed Balls as well

Independent - Matthew Norman - Will Blinky consign Labour to history?

Cocky, fake, slimy, inelegant, ineloquent, charmless, witless, weird, sinister, glacially cold and luminescently remote, he may be the most chillingly repulsive politician of even this golden generation. If Pixar set out to create a CGI character to embody everything the public has learned to despise about its political class, they'd be thrilled to come up with this lizardy schemer, who may have slipped through a tear in the fabric of space-time himself. Certainly he seems best suited to skulking beneath stone archways, in a purple robe, sibilantly sidling poison into the bloodstream of the medieval Vatican.

For a decade and more, this greyest of eminences has stirred, fixed, briefed and bullied, first to remove Mr Tony Blair; and latterly in the cause - keeping his master in power - that has pushed his party to the edge of the abyss. If he has a political philosophy, it is the domineering, top-down, we-know-best, infantilising statism of Gordon himself, but it's not really about that. For Mr Balls, it is football thug tribalism - a with-us-or-against-us Manichean sensibility next to which Mrs Thatcher seems a proto-Cleggian champion of consensus.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 10:33:26 AM EST
think we need a new thread

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 28th, 2010 at 10:34:04 AM EST


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