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UK Election open thread

by IdiotSavant Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 04:05:56 PM EST

Today UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown stepped out of the door of Downing Street and called an election for May 6th.  

Talk about it here.

bumped by afew


Display:
So, the important question: will the Greens win Brighton Pavilion?

(And the more important question: why do UKanians tolerate an electoral system which is so blatantly unfair?)

by IdiotSavant on Tue Apr 6th, 2010 at 06:39:16 AM EST
I give them a pretty good chance actually. Brighton's is a pretty savvy electorate and they know that electing a green would represent novelty. so, as she stands a genuine chance of winning, I'm fairly confident she'll do it.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 6th, 2010 at 05:34:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well its not quite as novel as the news will inevitably suggest. During the early 1990s  our local MP was a combined green party/Plaid Cymyu candidate, so he may be the first purely green MP, but not the first green one.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 at 06:15:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wait, that big, out-of-place-looking pavilion thing is a government headquarters?  I thought it was just something y'all had stolen from the Indians during the empire and kept around as a tourist joint.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 05:11:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No - that's the name of the constituency... the Pavilion itself is a museum I think.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 09:24:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oooooh.  Gotcha.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 11:52:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We tolerate that which is unavoidable. No politician will change a system that successfully elects them. As far as they're concerned, their arrival in Westminster shows that the system works, for who else so deserves the reward as they. A change to the system might disturb that ... best not.

They are the only ones who can change the system. They are the ones who most benefit from the status quo. Guess what ... ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 6th, 2010 at 05:36:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the story of how the swiss got their referendas is enlightening. IIRC, the Liberals were dominating the political landscape when the new party - the Democrats - launched a radical agenda of moving the power from the elected positions. After the Democrats scoring some local victories and there actually carrying out their agenda, the Liberals got frightened that they would loose and decided to pre-emptively reform the constitution to install referendas.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 at 04:19:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Although politicians are often reluctant to change a political system, it can happen.

As in the Swiss example when formerly dominant parties are uncertain about the future they may become open to change.

Politicians may like the system that elected them, but it is not impossible for change to take place if enough political actors see it as in their interests.

It is no accident that most European democracies adopted proportional representation after the First World War, when all the old political certainties had disappeared and no party could be certain of its future prospects.

It was quite possible that the UK could have moved to a new electoral system in 1918. The two Houses of the UK Parliament agreed there should be some change, but could not agree about the mix between the Alternative Vote (in single member constituencies) and the Single Transferable Vote (in multi member constituencies). The compromise, to ensure the extension of the franchise passed before the end of the First World War and the resumption of peace time politics, was to leave the traditional first past the post electoral system unchanged.

The moment for change passed and UK politics re-froze. Are we about to see a new chance of change? Clearly not if the Labour and Conservative parties can help it, but our electoral system is one of the things that are broken about our society.

by Gary J on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 07:29:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well it appears that My local MP (Tory) is one of only 9 who have signed to the "get the UK out of the EU now" Is one of only three who managed to score a 0 in stonewalls  recent analysis of voting records (alongside Anne Widdicome) managed to  vote for the abortion limit to be brought down to 12 weeks has been campaigning on the banning of Islamic dress and wants cuts in out of control immigration (but isn't a racist).

Oh and  "measures to strengthen families" taken from his election literature hardly sound the most progressive thing in the world.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 6th, 2010 at 12:08:20 PM EST
Pretty much the stereotypical Tory then.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 6th, 2010 at 05:37:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ceebs:
Oh and  "measures to strengthen families" taken from his election literature hardly sound the most progressive thing in the world.

well it could be, but we all know it's meaningless or pathetically insulting, like three quid a week for nappies.

he might as well have said hfvbtouwfyvboau.

serious progressive policies can't help but benefit families, duh.

it's a dogwhistle agin teh gayz or something equally charming.

a useless methane burp, and we worry about the cows...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 07:44:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The tantalising possibility is that of a hung parliament, because that is the best chance of effecting changes to the electoral system.

The reality is that the Ashcroft money is pouring into the marginals... and that will probably work...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 at 05:20:58 AM EST
I agree, the marginals are key and that's where the Tories have concentrated their efforts. I hope it will be a hung parliament, but fear the toreis will sneak over the line.

however, I remain pessimistic that there will ever be a change to the voting system. both major parties have too much vested interest in keeping the system as it is.

Of course, the tories want to leverage their dominance of england by reducing the number of scottish and welsh constituencies, for which there is a compelling argument (fewer electors per constituency in Scotland, plus they have their own parliament = massive over-representation). That will also wreck labour's chances in the future, which I'm sure the tories would see as a definite plus point. Sadly the labour party are far too stupid to see such a car crash coming and agitate seriously for a more democratic electoral system from a position of strength (ie they've already blown it). Please don't tell me about Brown's alleged conversion to the idea back in February, that was merely sad and desperate. the Labour party always talk electoral reform when they're weak and then ignore it when they're strong. I would never vote for them in the expectation of them supporting it, rather I'd be shocked and suspicious if they did.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 at 05:56:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If the Conservatives don't get over the line, I believe the opportunity will be there to get voting system conversation started. Will it be hard? Certainly. But I think the electorate is more ready than it ever has been.

People of my generation were still brainwashed in schools with propaganda about PR leading to X governments in Y months in Italy and lots of blathering about corruption. I think the expenses scandal has led to greater scepticism of the value of FPTP... and a hung parliament can continue the process.

I'm not saying that we'll get change now, that depends too much on the detail of the voting results, but it can start to become a serious option (as opposed to that thing the LibDems have to be ashamed about bringing up.)

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 at 03:16:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
People of my generation were still brainwashed in schools with propaganda about PR leading to X governments in Y months in Italy and lots of blathering about corruption.

We had the same shit in New Zealand.  15 years of stable government (well, barring Winston Peters, but even he didn't upset things too much - National still went full-term) has very much proved them wrong.

Instability is a product of political culture.  And voters can change that culture by de-electing those who do not play along.  If the UK got PR, its politicians would have to unlearn the bad habits of FPP, and learn instead to consult, negotiate and compromise.  They won't like that - but the choice shouldn't be up to them, it should be up to the people.  They dance to our tune, not the other way round!

by IdiotSavant on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 at 08:52:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Metatone:
Will it be hard? Certainly. But I think the electorate is more ready than it ever has been.

wouldn't that be splendid.

if only the lib dems had more forceful leadership, and policies that really stood out as forward-thinking.

right now they should be surging with the mutual distrust of the big boyz and their cozy whitehall network, but they seem detached, amiably collegial and lacking in fire in the belly.

when you see the demican logam in the usa, it makes you appreciate what a strange miracle it's been to have a third party so many years with a not insignificant following, but they seem to unstrenuously avoid ever being significant, indeed any more than symbolic.

the time would be right for new narrative, but they seem like they're watching bucolic cricket on the green, instead of engaging and using this historical moment to affirm a vision that revealed gordo for the centre right newlab apparatchik he is, and cameron for the airbrushed media creation he is.

clegg's not stupid, he has a clue, why doesn't come out and describe reality to an electorate that has been spun so long it doesn't believe a word the tweedle men are saying?

that's all it would take...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 07:57:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Liberal/Alliance/Liberal Democrats have usually been, in percentage vote terms, just about the strongest liberal party in Europe.

Since the 1920s the UK electoral system has relegated the third force to minor party status. Under any proportional system the party would have been a key part of the political system.

The Labour/Conservative two party system has been under serious strain since the general elections of 1974. Superficially, if you just look at how many MPs each party wins, nothing much has changed. However, as time has passed, the number of voters not supporting either major party has tended to gradually increase. If this trend continues eventually we will reach a tipping point, when the majority manufacturing properties of first past the post elections can no longer support the weight of the two party structure.

It is an open question whether unexpectedly large electoral changes happen this time, or if the current election is just a further stage in the decay of the old party system.

by Gary J on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 11:05:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As you know, Finland's had a hung parliament since the Sixties: with ministers often split across up to 6 parties. With the three main parties roughly equal in polled votes 20 - 22 % each (Right, Cnetre-right, SDP), there is plenty of room for juggling with the smaller parties.

The PM's party usually achieves some domination of the political agenda, but usually too, the results turn out to be marginal. Consensus tends to knock the stuffing out of anything that smacks of being ideological.

In the same way as the US Constitution sets out to instill a self-governing balance between the branches of government, so the consensus system limits excesses.

I think also that the UK could be politically transformed by a hung parliament. I hope it happens.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 at 10:35:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A hung Parliament, in a Westminster style first past the post Parliament, does not necessarily change majoritarian attitudes.

Canada has had quite a few minority federal governments during the past 50 years, without deciding to have coalitions or change the electoral system.

by Gary J on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 08:23:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Debillitated
1 Digital Economy Bill debate


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 at 06:42:14 AM EST
Times Higher Education - Clear preference for Clegg in poll

THE's general election survey shows the Lib Dems taking an early lead. John Morgan writes

As the nation prepares for a general election on 6 May, a Times Higher Education poll suggests that the Liberal Democrats may be winning the battle for the academy's votes.

In our voteHE online survey, 40 per cent of respondents say that they intend to vote Lib Dem, putting Nick Clegg's party ahead of Labour (33 per cent) and the Conservatives (15 per cent).

Other options, including not voting, are supported by 11 per cent of respondents.

The Lib Dems won even more support when readers were asked which party's higher education policies were best. Nearly half (49 per cent) went for the Lib Dems, 26 per cent for Labour and 14 per cent for the Tories.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 7th, 2010 at 08:49:23 PM EST
In a system of universal adult suffrage, the electorate is not limited to academics. Sadly, other sections of the electorate have different ideas and priorities.
by Gary J on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 08:29:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I know, but it was one of the more bizarre polls I've seen so far.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 09:22:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
'Lib Dems have clear majority among Lib Dem voters.'

Then again, for the Lib Dems that actually is news.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 07:31:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Eagle Eye - Michael Savage: As Cameron's poll lead widens, so does his credibility gap. But can you blame him?
Here's a curious thing. When the Tories were giving away few details about their policies a while back, and we all clammered for them to come clean, they were over the hill and far away in the polls.

Then when the recession hit, they came up with the austerity plan, when they admitted (finally) that things would be tough and cuts would have to be made. It culminated in the most downbeat and tough speech made by a shadow Chancellor for some time. What happened? The polls narrowed. We knew more, and we didn't like it. And Labour used it to show the Tories were a nasty lot, intent on wrecking the recovery. Unsurprisingly, this didn't go unnoticed by the Tory leadership. What was the result? An optimistic promise to voters - they would cancel most of Labour's planned national insurance rise. A tax cut. Hurrah.

One problem - the pledge has left them with a major credibility gap. Already struggling to explain their determination to cut faster and deeper than Labour, they now had to find an additional £6bn - which they have done through claiming to find more of those wonderful things, efficiency savings.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 09:22:08 AM EST
ceebs:
When the Tories were giving away few details about their policies a while back, and we all clammered for them to come clean, they were over the hill and far away in the poll

i think that was reflex blame the present leader for the meltdown mostly.

once the focus started on dave, his phoniness became readily transparent.

and gordo waffles on like the titanic captain...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 08:32:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No matter who wins it will be male person. So much for sex equality. Anyway the winner should commit UK to end the shameful wars which Mr Blair had started. By the way Blair also secured the Olympics in London and it is unbecoming for the host nation to be engaged in two bloody military campaigns (though in one conflict, Iraq, it's just scores of civilians who continue to die almost daily) in contradiction to Olympics movement charter [which says that Olympics should be "promoting a peaceful society concerned with the preservation of human dignity"]. If not, the Beijing Olympics relay torch - style protests may be organized and countries will be urged to boycott the games.
by FarEasterner on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 10:09:17 AM EST
This Much I Know - » The Conservative iPhone app and the DPA

I'm an iPhone app developer. I'm interested in new apps that do interesting things. I also have an interest in data privacy. So when I heard that the Conservative Party had launched an app with a canvassing feature, I thought I should try it out.

Call A Friend

Here's how it works. Imagine that a Conservative voter - let's call him Peter - wants to campaign on behalf of the Conservative Party. He installs their app, and taps the "Call a friend" button. He sees some brief instructions, and taps "Continue".

<snip>

This Much I Know - » The Conservative iPhone app and the DPA

Consent

I read more. In order to process someone's personal data, you must meet at least one of several conditions. For this app, it looks as though the relevant condition is that Bob has given "consent to the processing".

However, the app doesn't ask Bob for his permission at all, let alone check whether he has given his consent. The app doesn't even ask Peter if consent was given, and doesn't provide any guidance as to how Peter should approach Bob when he calls. By the looks of it, it is entirely Peter's choice as to whether he even mentions the fact that Bob's data will be sent on.

Summary

So what does this all mean?  Well, if my understanding of the DPA is correct:

  • It's possible that personal data is being stored or processed by the Conservative Party, without them having any contact with the person whose data is being processed
  • There is no verification that the data is provided with the consent of the person that data refers to
  • The app doesn't give a clear indication of what the data will be used for
  • Neither the app nor its supporting web sites contain a privacy notice describing how the data may be stored and used

I should stress that I don't know if or how the Conservative Party are storing or processing the data from these emails (although I have contacted them to find out, and will post again when I hear back). I would be very grateful if anyone with experience of the Data Protection Act could confirm if my reading of the Act is correct.

Ooooops

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 11:35:43 AM EST
Hmmm, sounds like a very clear breach of the Data Protection act.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 12:36:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
MORTON'S FORK 2010: The morning after the trite before - Chicken Yoghurt

I woke this morning with a palpable sense of relief that it had all been a dream. A very long, exceedingly dull yet febrile dream. But I see with dismay that yes, the general election really is all happening...

Only the British can combine the raw materials of a Queen, a prime minister, an election and a 775-room palace and from them create an occasion with all the pomp-soaked drama of a man clocking in and out of a car park.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 11:59:44 AM EST
BBC News - London UKIP election candidate in racism row

A UKIP parliamentary candidate has been reinstated after posting racist remarks on a social care website.

Paul Wiffen, who is campaigning to be MP for Ilford South in east London, responded to a criticism of the party on the Community Care site.

The remarks focused on Muslims, Romanian Gypsies and African and Caribbean communities.

UKIP said he had been suspended but, following his apology and an inquiry, he was allowed back into the party.

The comment was made in response to a post by Community Care's Outside Left blogger on asylum.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 01:47:22 PM EST
UKIP, the party for people who are more racist than the tories, but less thuggish than the BNP

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 02:05:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Discover how much power you have as a UK voter in your constituency

In the 2005 election, more than half of all voters voted against their winning MP.

Their votes were simply thrown away.

In the UK, the only voters with any real power to choose the government are those who live in marginal constituencies.

Less than 20% of constituencies can be considered marginal.

The rest of us have little or no power to influence the outcome of the election.

In fact, statistical analysis by the nef (the new economics foundation) shows that one person in the UK does not have one vote...



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 8th, 2010 at 07:37:27 PM EST
Even that 20% I'd suggest is a wild over-exaggeration.

Swings of 150,000 people spread across 50 constituencies can swing an election, that's about 0.3% of the electorate.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 9th, 2010 at 08:29:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In New Zeland under FPP, elections were determined by as few as 154 voters in 3 marginal seats.  Everyone else's vote was basically irrelevant.

Which is one of the reasons we got rid of it.  The unfairness was there for everyone to see.  Even then, it took the best part of a decade to convince the politicians.

by IdiotSavant on Sun Apr 11th, 2010 at 08:32:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
{laughs} that's outrageous.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 09:49:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Telegraph - How I should vote in the General Election

A fun little questionaire, obviously heavily skewed towards telegraph type issues. But I came out as practically a dead heat for Green and Lib Dem with labour a distant third.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 09:51:49 AM EST
They don't let us pagans in Finland try it...

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 11:03:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They let us try it (Air Strip One and all that).  I scored 73% Lib-Dem, 62% Green, 52% Labour.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 06:08:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
68% LibDem
67% Green
48% Labour

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 10:23:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
75% Green, 70% LibDem, 69% Labour - huh!?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 11:49:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the % is a measure of how much you agree with the individual parties policies.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 12:57:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well duh - but I didn't expect to be equidistant to these three, and all with lots shared. It's from the Torygraph, though.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 14th, 2010 at 07:56:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well when I entered my details, I thought that my result came out a lot less Labour than i would have thought. I did wonder whether it was biassed to split thee vote on the left

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 14th, 2010 at 08:13:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I gave my birthplace as postal code, and got Scottish greens 74%, SNP 61% (? I was against Scottish independence), Liberal Democrats 57%, Labour 52%, UKIP 50% (?? I was in favour of all pro-EU questions), Tories 37%, BNP 30%.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Apr 14th, 2010 at 08:11:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oi

David Cameron will tomorrow promise to deliver the most extensive devolution of power in a generation when he declares that a Conservative government would hand people "direct control" over how they are governed nationally and locally.

In a direct invitation to voters to join him in governing Britain, the Tory leader will promise in his election manifesto to offer California-style referendums on any local issue if residents can win the support of 5% of the population.

Adopting historic language from the Labour movement about the "collective strength" of society, Cameron will also pledge to let people "be your own boss" as public sector workers are allowed to assume ownership of the services they provide.

Because when you think competent governance, you think Gullyvornyah.

"Could you sign this petition to make earthquakes illegal?  They're really starting to bother me."

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Apr 12th, 2010 at 06:17:43 PM EST
There are some states where these are used less recklessly, such as Washington. But there the initiative/referendum system is subject to greater regulation.

Here in California, where there are no spending limits of any kind for initiative campaigns, the combination of huge sums of money and the right-wing veto enshrined in the requirement to have a 2/3rds vote to approve a tax increase have produced not only a broken initiative process, but a broken state government.

This seems a ploy by Cameron to move more decision-making to places and means where the Tories have more control, but I'd be curious to hear what those with more familiarity with the situation have to say about it.

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 02:07:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Is UKIPs chairman a conspiracy to make the tories look less posh and out of touch?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 09:05:32 AM EST
Has Dave tried on a cloth cap yet?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 09:35:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He was hysterical in that interview. mostly gormlessly clueless with more than a whiff of offensively ignorant.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 12:56:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 01:19:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
particularly stunning in the short interview was his mental calculation,  which paraphrased was that we could save six billion by pulling out of the EU, which is £180 million a day. which would pay for 600 nurses.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 02:06:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow, I never could have imagined that British nurses were so well paid.
by Zwackus on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 09:07:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The FactCheck Blog - UKIP Manifesto 2010: expelling foreign criminals

And it wasn't just David Cameron in the spotlight today as the UK Independence Party also published their manifesto  so FactCheck duly got to work:

The analysis
"EU and human rights legislation means we cannot even expel foreign criminals if they come from another EU country."



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 02:42:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Conservative manifesto at a glance | Politics | guardian.co.uk
The main points of the Tory plan for re-election as unveiled by David Cameron in London today


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 09:19:52 AM EST
The FactCheck Blog - Conservative Manifesto 2010: inheritance tax, crime & unemployment
FactCheck thought we had a hard day yesterday working on the Labour Manifesto but when 120 pages of the Conservative manifesto dropped in our inboxes we stopped what we were doing and got to work.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 02:13:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
General election 2010: Labour manifesto at a glance | Politics | guardian.co.uk
Guardian correspondents explain the key points in the policies Gordon Brown hopes will help him return to Downing Street


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 09:23:14 AM EST
GENERAL ELECTION: New Labour's manifesto mash-up - Chicken Yoghurt

So, away from the sub-CBeebies condescension of New Labour's manifesto cartoons, what do we have?

It won't bother enough (or indeed many at all) to make any difference whatsoever but one of the chapters in the New Labour manifesto for the 2010 General Election is entitled `Crime and immigration'. They put crime and immigration under the same heading. Like love and marriage.

People can protest that the chapter merely covers the activities of the Home Office. The fact is, however, that this government has worked hard at conflating immigration with criminality. As New Labour election supremo Douglas Alexander put, it in a frankly piss-poor and weaselly answer when asked about it on Radio 4's PM yesterday, `there's a common theme'. This is particularly the case when it comes to asylum seekers or, as we used to call them in a more generous age, refugees. How do we hate them? Let me count the ways.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 03:56:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
that's the problem with NuLab. However much you want ot like them for the social good things they do, or even the well-intentioned things that go wrong, there are always threads of authoritarianism, control and sheer bloody-minded nastiness to lay alongside their absolutely catastrophic kowtowing to the City.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 04:22:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Institute For Fiscal Studies - No new taxes?

The Conservatives have also signalled - although there was no reference to this in the manifesto - that they would prefer to see deficit reduction measures split 4:1 between spending cuts and tax increases, rather than the 2:1 split implied by the Government's plans. If they aim for the same overall tightening of 4.8% of national income or £70 billion in today's terms as the Government, then a 4:1 split would imply an eventual spending cut of around 3.8% of national income (£56 billion) and a tax increase of around 1.0% of national income (£14 billion). If the Government was to stick with a 2:1 ratio throughout its planned tightening, it would be looking for eventual spending cuts of 3.2% of national income (£47 billion) and tax increases of 1.6% of national income (£23 billion).

The tax increases that the Government has already announced will deliver about 1.2% of national income (£17 billion) in the medium term, suggesting that they might need to announce further tax increases worth around 0.4% of national income (£6 billion). Of the 3.2% of national income spending cut (£47 billion) they need, their plans to 'protect' (but shrink as a share of national income) non-investment spending on the NHS and part of the education budget, offset by a rise in the share of national income spent on overseas aid, would get them only a small part of the way there. We would have to wait for a Labour Spending Review to see where much of the rest fell.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 01:09:39 PM EST
alex thomson (alextomo) on Twitter
,Election non-news - where's the deabte on the war? Afghanistan? our people, their people dying but no mention, no leadership here

All this as all reporting with British forces is banned during the election -- ForeignOffice/ Mod inspired censorship...

Which helps no end with the non-debate going on here as they appear in their buses, power stations, factories (delete as applicable)..>

No . I amnot kidding. Mod - possibloy wint Foreign Offcie connivance, have completely banned Afghan embeds during the election

MoD spinner emailed me to say when this was put to the media they didn't complain much. So I asked around.

Journos told me people went ballistic. Seems the MoD spinner was, well, just spinning, after all.

They didn't ban war reporting at end of WW2 election - but then again look at what happened to Churchill.    

(properly ordered and unpicked)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 01:56:13 PM EST
doesn't surprise me at all, but there's surely nothing to stop them taking reporting from foreign embeds. American reporting on the Afghanistan situation is getting quite tasty at the moment and they don't even have to translate that.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 03:03:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apparently theyve sent an un-embedded news crew out for the period.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 04:32:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Based in Kabul and officially banned from talking to anybody.

might as well stay at home and browse wikileaks

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 05:08:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian - Jonathan freedland - the Tory manifesto launch

Intersting video presentation (1:37). He is suspecting that Cameron is getting good at the presentation thing.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 03:06:29 PM EST
Guardian - Jackie Ashley - Who's got the time for Big Society?

Is a lot less sure

Would I like to join the government? I'd love to Dave, but I'm afraid I don't have time.  ...- and I know that all these things take time, lots of time. There are regular evening meetings to attend, documents to read, publicity to prepare. And the internal politics of most small organisations make Westminster look like a playgroup.

This seems to me the biggest and least thought through problem with the Conservative's Big Society. Modern life is so busy,...

My humble experience at local level has taught me two things: everyone wants a say in how an organisation is run. And very few people are prepared to give up their precious time to help.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 13th, 2010 at 03:10:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Channel4 are reporting that  Liam Fox and other Tory front benchers are under investigation by UK tax authorities...

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 14th, 2010 at 09:10:17 AM EST
Conservatives: the self-parody party....

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 14th, 2010 at 02:46:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
General Election debate: Lib Dems attack David Cameron over comments on rules - Telegraph

The Liberal Democrats angrily attacked David Cameron for complaining about the detailed terms for the debate which his own officials had been instrumental in drawing up.

The Tory leader expressed concern that the tightly-controlled format would hamper free-flowing discussion and lead to a ''slow and sluggish'' programme which would leave viewers disappointed.

However the Lib Dem head of general election communications, Johnny Oates, said the Conservative negotiating team had actively sought to make the rules more restrictive.

''I think that if he had an issue about the rules being too restrictive, he should have sent a different negotiating team with a different negotiating brief,'' he told BBC Radio 4's The World at One.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 10:26:30 AM EST
General Election 2010: Eddie Izzard's Party Political Broadcast for the Labour Party is awfully good - Telegraph Blogs
There's no getting around this: Eddie Izzard's Party Political Broadcast for the Labour Party is masterly. I know, I know. Who cares what a celebrity thinks? But he actually deals with that point in the broadcast, pointing out he's been a Labour Party member since the mid-90s - he then goes on to diffuse the issue by making a joke about it. The whole thing is full of jokes, in fact -- good jokes, funny jokes. And it's the blend of humour and seriousness that makes it so effective.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 10:33:47 AM EST
I wish that were true, but it isn't. It was a very dull grey sock in the washing machine kind of broadcast. It went round and round in circles till the spin cycle ran out.

And all I could think (cattily) was, "you were a lot funnier when you wore a frock".

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 09:18:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'd have to agree. Still one of my favourites, but the compromises that inevitably have to be made to pursue Hollywood have removed the surprisingness of the Izzard mind. Whether rehearsed or impromptu, his stand-ups were earlier like an enthusiastic and inquisitive child wandering through a bombed library - including the magazine and newspaper section. It was McLuhanistic hot media because we, the audience, had to work quite hard to keep up with the thread. Working hard as an audience means you are involved - active, not passive.

Now he's all hi-res, polished and more predictable. It's easier to be passive.

Sadly so many brilliant comedians don't live too long.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 09:33:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tory election HQ is a lot like Google | Julian Glover | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk
If Google did politics, it might be something like the third floor of Millbank Tower. Behind two sets of security, in the offices where New Labour's 1997 victory was won, 300 Conservatives are now doing their best to make David Cameron prime minister. The mood is young, keen and informal; lots of daylight, lots of white paint and rows of computers and screens. It feels like the kind of place where everyone has had a gap year and everyone might buy an iPad, the optimistic end of the digital age.

Wonder how many of your staff understand the "Don't be evil" concept?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 11:15:50 AM EST
Maybe the first signs that the polls are starting to show their usual rise for the Lib/Dems.  YouGov/Sun poll: Con: 37 (-4); Lab: 31 (-1); Lib Dem: 22 (+4) A good result for Cameron tonight  will be needed or  we could see carnage and disintegrations in the campaign

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 at 03:21:24 PM EST
It's going to be interesting to see how those figures move, if at all, following Clegg's apparent win in the debate.  I'd be a bit nervous if I were the Tories right now.  They've looked far less strong than they, by all rights, should given the shape the country's in, and after Clegg cleaned house last night (at least in the eyes of voters), it wouldn't be shocking for me to see Tory support being more soft than Labour.

Reason being, if you're with Brown now, I think you're probably going to be with Brown at the election unless Clegg miraculously generates enough to support to form a coalition government in a hung parliament (even under the miracle scenario, I can't imagine the LDs with a majority).

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 09:38:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Good point, I hadn't thought of it like that. The tories support is soft and Clegg could pinch a significant piece of it, especially as people are increasingly prepared to vote tactically.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 12:51:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One scenario:

The Tories in hopeless districts vote LD to keep Labour out and Labour votes LD in hopeless districts to keep the Tories out and ....

LD majority.

(You read it here, first.)

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 02:23:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There aren't enough LDs standing to win an absolute majority. A hung parliament with an LD casting vote is the best we can hope for.

Besides - I don't see a great deal of difference between the relevant party positions. There's the usual leaky bucketload of rhetoric, but it's frightening how closely the parties agree about almost everything.

It's not as if anyone is proposing something radical, like representative democracy.

Cameron's pitch is just a cynical attempt to sell government off to his rich wobbly chums, as he well knows.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 03:02:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My tongue was firmly implanted in my cheek whilst writing the comment.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 03:12:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There's quite a bit of similarity, depressingly.  But I thought the LDs supported electoral reform to require winning candidates to have a majority?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 04:00:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There aren't enough LDs standing to win an absolute majority.

What?

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 01:19:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are only around 100 standing.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 02:01:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Huh. They have PPCs for most constituencies. Why would 80% of them not actually stand?

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 02:08:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 02:42:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hm? I see 631 candidates listed...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 02:48:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
[Official TBG Lack Of Sleep Fail™]
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 06:50:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ThatBritGuy:

it's frightening how closely the parties agree about almost everything.

It's not as if anyone is proposing something radical, like representative democracy.

true dat.

daft old fart v. daft young squirt.

sewn up... The PTB has won, whichever janus face is on top.

at least this doesn't have to drag on 2 freaking years, like in the USA.

watching these shucksters is already making me feel liverish, and it's only just begun.

i guess covering them all with a thick layer of ash might help...

or giving clegg some arnie-type steroids.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 04:46:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The FactCheck Blog - Cameron's Lexus takes a wrong turn?

I went to a Hull police station the other day. They had five different police cars, and they were just about to buy a £73,000 Lexus.
David Cameron, Leaders debate, 15 April 2010

Cathy Newman checks it out
Politicians like to have a go at the police for spending too much time behind a desk and not enough time pounding the streets. But last night, PC Plod got it in the neck over his choice of wheels.

During last night's TV debate, David Cameron suggested the fancy Lexus purchased by the police in Hull was a striking example of public sector waste. But was it anything of the sort?



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 10:50:58 AM EST
I know that I, for one, am shocked.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 11:12:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cameron is bitching about a £73,000 car and wants to buy a £29 billion Trident missile system.

The push-back on this could be amusing.


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 02:30:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But, but, without that we'll be invaded by the Chinese....

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 02:38:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think it's going to take a bit more than a few nukes to stop the Chinese if they decide they want to invade.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 02:50:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you know that, I know that. I imagine even Cameron knows that. But it's easy for a conservative to sell fear as military endeavour, a lot harder to do the sensible thing.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 03:02:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ZOMGTEHPREZNITISAKENYAMUSLIN!!!!

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 04:01:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Never fear.  

Oceania will fight the EastAsian hordes to protect Airstrip One.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 03:16:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC | BBC College of Journalism Discussion Homepage

What did last night's election debate mean for British journalism and media?

The thoughts of some of our regular bloggers are below. Please add your view in the comment box.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 10:57:30 AM EST
The Media Blog: A "first class" performance by Cameron and ITV
Pundits, journalists and news reporters tried hard to talk in professional terms about David Cameron's poor showing in the Leaders Debate last night but some critics were slightly less subtle. ITV may this morning be wishing it had read the Tweets and Facebook updates it shared with the world a little more closely (if the video* doesn't play, there are some screengrabs beneath):

(ITV have copyright blocked the video, but the screengrabs are still there.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 11:13:26 AM EST
ICM sees Clegg's support surging.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 11:32:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He's got to solidify that with some very astute owrk in the next week, and he's got to win the next two debates as well.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 12:58:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The big concern right now is that he'll get too conservative in the next two debates for fear of screwing it up.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 01:18:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a danger, but Vince holds the economic policy so that means that Clegg is free to just do the Diana bambi eyes thing again and look deeeeply caring.

Brown doesn't have to respond to this cos it's not threatening his vote so he'll just stay wonky cos that's his comfort zone. It's cameron who'll have to come out swinging and I'm wondering what he;ll say.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 02:11:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But does Cameron come out swinging against Clegg?  That could be a mistake, both because (1) it would elevate Clegg and the Lib-Dems even more and (2) it would be pretty transparent and nasty in the eyes of voters who seem to have already formed a fairly positive opinion of Clegg.

Brown should be happy by all of this, of course.  As long as Cameron isn't getting a majority of seats, he's still got a shot to hold the office.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 02:46:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 Michael Gove, tory strategist was suggesting they're gonna go for the Lib dems in the nest week.

It would be a mistake, not just for the reasons you suggest, but because Clegg isn't the wonk guy you can de-stabilize with the deep thoughts. He's the Blair smiley face who puts voters at ease (without the heart of evil). He'll just roll with the attacks, do the chicken noise and kung fu it by looking at the audience and saying "see we must be doing something right".

that's what all that naming people, looking them in the eye, walking up to them did. He made them part of the team. I bet that was all nicked from Clinton's debate with Bush 1.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 03:00:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
According to A Guardian reporter on the LIb Dem Bus

Nick Clegg definitely came out of last night oblivious that he'd done well. He thought he fluffed the first half


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 03:31:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 12:56:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apparently it was a B3TA person

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 01:47:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, what the silly insert people ? How disappointing. I really wanted that to have been real

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 02:07:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Voter's guide to engineering a hung parliament - Channel 4 News
The leaders debates have renewed speculation about a hung parliament, so Channel 4 News thought it would be interesting to find out whether it was possible to vote for one. Independent political analyst Greg Callus reports.

A general election resulting in a hung parliament (where no single party has an overall majority of seats) is not that common in recent times. In the 20th century, only the general elections of 1910, 1923, 1929 and February 1974 failed to give any party more than half the country's MPs.

But 2010 seems like a potential candidate, if not least because since 1945 no government with a working majority has ever lost power to a different government with a working majority. Pundits and pollsters currently suggest a close finish again this year, and oddly, the public seem not to mind.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 16th, 2010 at 12:25:11 PM EST
David Cameron Anecdote Generator

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 10:11:01 AM EST
Last week, I met a Jewish Chelsea supporter, who told me that paedo bikinis were making them think about emigrating.
ROFL

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 01:18:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Last week, I met a Dutch banker, who told me that paedo bikinis raped the next door's beagle.

Awesome.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 05:26:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's brilliant.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 02:46:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Last week, I met a Lithuanian World War Two veteran, who told me that the Politically Correct brigade should be stopped before things get any worse."

Great!

"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char

by Melanchthon on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 03:58:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Last week, I met a wheelchair-bound youth worker, who told me that paedophiles always go to the front of the housing queue."

I love it!


"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char

by Melanchthon on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 03:59:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Last week, I met an old youth worker, who told me that the National Debt killed Diana."


"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char
by Melanchthon on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 04:07:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
DaDavid Cameron?

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 05:22:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Last week, I met an African World War Two veteran, who told me that anti-capitalists should be banned from drinking in England and Wales."

Run for the border Helen!

I'll give you covering fire.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 04:41:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Damn, they've closed the airports on me.

It's a plot

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 08:31:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Last week, I met an African World War Two veteran, who told me that Polly Toynbee was to blame for the recession.

Heh!

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 05:25:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Who has David Cameron been talking to?
"Last week, I met a Lithuanian cabin boy, who told me that 5 more years of Gordon Brown served in the Royal Navy for 30 years."
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 06:49:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Last week, I met a lesbian investment banker, who told me that the European Human Rights Act put them on benefits."


"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char
by Melanchthon on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 09:10:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Last week, I met a devout Muslim World War Two veteran, who told me that Gypsies were no substitute for proper married relationships."

Heh

"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char

by Melanchthon on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 09:57:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You're enjoying this gadget far too much :-))

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 09:59:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, I find it brilliant;

This one sounds true:

"Last week, I met a devout Muslim policeman, who told me that binge drinkers served in the Royal Navy for 30 years."


"Ce qui vient au monde pour ne rien troubler ne mérite ni égards ni patience." René Char
by Melanchthon on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 10:28:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I've heard that, but I think it's the hopelessness of their wasted lives serving in the Royal Navy that makes them resort to drink.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 11:42:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cameron 'got it wrong'

TORY leader David Cameron got his maths and his message wrong, says the Plymouth man referred to in this week's historic televised leaders debate.

Speaking about immigration to an audience of nine million viewers, Mr Cameron said: "I was in Plymouth recently and a 40-year-old black man... said, 'I came here when I was six, I've served in the Royal Navy for 30 years. I'm incredibly proud of my country. But I'm so ashamed that we've had this out-of-control (immigration) system with people abusing it so badly'."

The man referred to was Plymouth businessman Neal Forde, aged 51.

He told The Herald that he was teased by his workmates yesterday morning.

"I don't mind. At least he took 10 years off my age," said Mr Forde.

"And he said I spent 30 years in the Navy. I was actually in for six years, as a marine engineer serving on HMS Intrepid and HMS Berwick."



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 10:19:12 AM EST
I was in Plymouth recently and a 40-year-old black man... said, 'I came here when I was six, I've served in the Royal Navy for 30 years

The 40-year-old joined the navy no later than age 10?

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 01:16:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a long standing national tradition, having the underaged younger sons of quality sign on to the service early, in the hopes that they might find a patron in the service quickly.

Oh, wait, wrong century.

by Zwackus on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 09:20:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sundays polls after first  debate

ComRes for S Mirror/Independent on Sunday

Con 31 -4, Lab 27 -2, LD 29 +8 Oth 13 -2.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 11:47:34 AM EST
John Rentoul - Second poll shows Lib Dems overtaking Labour
ComRes for Sunday Mirror/Independent on Sunday tomorrow puts Lib Dems in second place:

Conservative                31 (-4)
Labour                 &nbs p;        27 (-2)
Lib Dem                 &nbs p;     29 (+8)
Others               &nbs p;           13  (-2)
 
Change since last ComRes poll, for Independent/ITV News 14 April.
Change since ComRes for IoS/S Mirror 11 April: Con -8, Lab -5, LD +13, Others nc.

Additional questions:


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 11:58:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 Electoral Calculus gives Con 239 seats, Lab 273, LD 106.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 12:09:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's a staggering difference from what they've got up on their web page:  Con 304, Lab 236, LD 78.

Such a difference I'm wondering if their Model has gone ping! on 'em.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 12:45:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well that's plugging the new ComRes figures into their model

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 12:48:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If your projection holds wouldn't that be a historic collapse on the part of the Cons?  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 01:09:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well its about a 40 seat increase on where they are now, but from where they expected to be as little as a month ago, its not good at all.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 01:26:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From this side of the Atlantic it seems air brush boy Cameron and his pals are doing everything in their power to throw the election.  

I understand Parliament is elected district by district - or whatever you call 'em - and the relation of national support to district support, especially to the marginal swing districts Helen has talking about, is tenuous.  Further, it may very well be I don't understand UK election strategy and tactics.  But ...

Jimminey.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 01:45:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the Tories are ultimately hopeless. Their 2005 campaign was also horrible. It's a combination of them being out of touch as well as peope recoiling as soon as the mask slips and they get a glimpse of the "ugly Tory" underneath.

The brainless should not be in banking -- Willem Buiter
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 01:51:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Using ceeb's numbers they are facing a ~56% Not Tory (Lab & LD combined) on their left plus some percentage, don't know what it is, of Not Tory to their right.  That doesn't leave them much room to eke a Parliamentary majority.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 02:14:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fewer votes, more seats.  That stinks.
by IdiotSavant on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 10:01:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Another has the LDs taking the lead.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 02:41:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting comment by "Jamie" there:

Another great looser from this election seems to be FPTP. Even if the Lib Dems finish last they will probably have the political clout to demand PR as a condition of any support. And if they come 2nd or 1st but still have vastly fewer seats I think the public outcry would be so great that the government would have absolutely no choice but to put PR to a referendum.

that I don't know enough to evaluate.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 02:50:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 02:53:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is that a "yep" to Jamie's comment or a "yep" to my ignorance?

:-)


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 03:11:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
To Jamie's comment. :)  Should be quite interesting if the LDs can keep it up.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 03:15:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
UK Polling Report now showing Labour short by 39 seats to form the government.  Tory implosion coming?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 at 03:21:55 PM EST
I read somebody saying that the reason why Gordon "bottled" the "2007 election that never was" was because Labour need the Lib Dem support to be in the low to mid 20s to damage the conservative vote sufficiently for them to win. At the time, the LDs were in the mid-teens and so the conservative vote would have been too strong.

An LD surge hurts the tories more than labour.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 08:36:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Possibly, but I thought at the time Brown had gotten a good bump in the polls leading up to the election that never happened.  If he'd won it, he'd probably be safe, waiting out the recession until 2012.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 10:47:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe, who knows ? If you could have made such a prediction accurately, you'd be working for Rahm now. hindsight is 20/20, foresight less so.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 11:40:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't be silly, if I could make such a prediction accurately, Rahm would call me a DFH and try to take credit for people I got elected without actually hiring me.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 11:53:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
From what I gathered....

The reason Brown decided not to go in 2007 was because the polling in the key marginals was very poor. It was the first time they noticed the effect of Ashcroft's money.

Money is a sign of Poverty - Culture Saying

by RogueTrooper on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 04:58:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
entirely possible. There are as many theories as there are commentators. Personally I put it down to Brown's demonstrable indecision and a rationale that couldn't see the point of risking a perfectly excellent landslide majority just to gain some personal mandate, something which  had a dubious merit, especially as the people who most wanted it were those who most wanted him out.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 05:51:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think we need a new election thread.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 05:52:07 PM EST
Agreed.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 06:49:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
YouGov:

LD 33 (+4)
Con 32 (-1)
Lab 26 (-3)

Lib-Dems still surging.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 at 06:52:39 PM EST


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