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Tuesday Open Thread

by Colman Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 09:51:53 AM EST

A bit early today: database has been repaired and strange errors have gone away. We'll now see if that helps wacky performance issues.


Display:
talking of wacky performances, I was investigating some of my old vinyl records today and played alpha centauri by tangerine Dream. Once upon a (non-drug assisted) psychedelic time, I'd have happily drifted off to 7th bardo or whatever they called it and felt muchly enriched.

But now, jaded ears hear the random noises that drift in and out and I think "y'know, this gives self-indulgent piffle a bad name"

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 09:57:12 AM EST
LOL

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:25:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
gave you a 4 for the thought, but...

music does reflect the times, and fersure, they were different times. the listeners had different ears, and why not?

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:59:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh yea. Particularly with electronic music, that which sounds cutting edge today is tomorrows embarrassing parps and tweets.

But other stuff endures. The soundtrack to the film "The Forbidden Planet", recorded in the 50s still sounds pretty interesting and exotic today. A lot of Delia Derbyshire stuff, particularly her early 70s stuff, could have been recorded today.

But that drifting ambient stuff the Tangs did really was just of its time.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:17:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You can't beat the Doctor Who theme.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:20:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As a 70s Tangs fan I disagree.

There were some noodle-fests like Alpha Centauri, a handful of standout synth albums before Baumann left, and then a long decline into mediocrity with occasional but tragically rare flashes of the sublime.

The standout synth albums like Rubycon and Phaedra still hold their own. There's been nothing quite like them since - and not for want of trying, by various literal-minded imitators.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:21:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually I wouldn't disagree with that. And I still intend to listen to Atem and Zeit later on and there are certainly moments on the later that I believe remain unmatched.

But AC has gone off my list

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:30:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Forbidden Planet music was the first mass release film to be scored 100% electronic instrument: the Theremin.

Last year I had the opportunity to fart around experiment with an original Theremin.  What a blast.  Yacked around with the owner about how cool it would be to have movement through space (dance) with sensors that would create sounds.  The dance and the music would, thus, be One Thing. Once the dance movement was digitized the lighting and Set 'design' could be plugged-in as well.

 

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:35:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Anybody else still listen to Velvet Underground?

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:38:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
they still have a louche popularity, but 'twas never my thing

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:44:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
OMG!

I'm a louche.

(What's a louche?  Ah ... "questionable taste or morality" ?????????????????)

wah

:-(

;-)

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 02:08:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you, Colman.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:10:03 AM EST
Oh dear, France 1-0 down, down to ten men, and couldn't even get ten players to stand together for the team photo....

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:30:27 AM EST
Looks like France are doing the decent thing...

Collective suicide, to gift a double-digit score to the host nation.

That's uncharacteristically decent of them.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:32:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't enjoy it too much or it will be returned 100-fold when england get tonked by Slovenia tomorrow

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:32:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
2-0

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:39:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And Uraguay are now 1-0 up

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:45:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Looks like France have sorted it out and S Africa won't score again

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:28:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No they really needed to do it in the first half

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:49:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I almost dread watching that


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:45:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I know what you mean. It could be behind-the-sofa time

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 10:50:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
  • Tue.: France vs. South Africa in Mangaung.
  • Wed: England vs. Slovenia in Port Elizabeth.
  • Thurs: England vs. France at Airport


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:23:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is an epic collapse.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 11:27:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think, is that to coach a team of highly-strung prima donna millionaires, you need someone who's not only a martinet (which Domenech actually is) but who is their equal on the social and financial level.

The problem is, he's a pure product of the French football federation, who are actually dedicated to the values of the amateur game, etc... As exemplified by Aimé Jacquet, who forged the world champions of 1998, and, like Domenech, never coached a major club.

I think that's what it boils down to. The current generation of bling-bling brats are just incapable of taking orders from someone who they feel is their inferior, because he earns so much less than them.

I'm curious to see how Laurent Blanc will handle the (poisoned) succession. As one of the heroes of 1998, and also a successful club manager (Bordeaux), I suppose he has a better chance than most.

A better solution would be to bring in a foreigner. But they don't know how to do that.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 12:23:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So what's the difference between these prima donna millionaires and those of other countries?

Have all the other sides got millionaire coaches?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 12:37:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't know the extent to which this is true generally, but professional footballers seem to me to be exceptionally well paid children still playing a game rather than a serious sport.

So, in order to get them to do things, they need somebody they respect to boss them around, bully them a bit, instill fear. They have to be somebody you know you shouldn't cross. Equally tho', the players have to believe in the manager's vision, the game plan must make sense.

That's why Capello lost the dressing room a bit, he's feared but he has continued with a failed plan that the players believe doesn't effectively utulise the strengths within the squad.

Domenech has twice the problem, no vision and no respect. It "worked" 4 years ago because Zidane was the bully and they got through despite Domenech. Now...

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 12:47:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sure, I get the bit about the need for a boss, or at least someone who's respected.

Where I was disagreeing with eurogreen was the notion that respect had to come from high income.

Obviously, Domenech was useless. The loss of respect comes more from that, coupled with his unflinchingly stupid and outspoken media style. And that the French Federation kept this joker on for far longer than they ever should.

Yes, in the Zidane years it was Zidane who masked the uselessness of Domenech. Not by bullying, I don't think -- more by the natural authority of being one of the greatest players of all time, and by being the tactician and play-maker on the field.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 01:00:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think it's less a case of the money and more a case of the lack of achievement. Basically you get the right to manage a top flight team by virtue of having worked your way up through the lower levels of management with a consistent record of success.

Your success rate and the respect of your peers is your passport to respect from players. I don't know about Jaquet, but if Domenech has no track record then he'll have zero credibility with players used to dealing with the best of the best.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 02:13:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Jacquet had a great concept, and got his players to act it (weren't many of them high-paid stars by that time already, BTW? Henry and Barthez not yet, but Zidane, Djorkaeff, Deschamps, Desailly, Lizarazu?), Domenech nothing much.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 05:24:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Domenech was a crap trainer ever since he's on the national team, that is 2004. He builds an idea-free attack, he doesn't forge unity in his team, and he doesn't fire on his team, always sitting there like an uninvolved spectator. I give him zero credit for the 2006 silver medal, that was the 1998 heroes (and 2004 failures) returning for a last hurrah after Domenech's team struggled in the qualifications (and IIRC they forced Domenech to change the basic lineup in the course of the 2006 tournament). He should have been fired right after the exit from Euro 2008, when he proclaimed satisfaction with himself when marrying right after the exit.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 05:18:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Newt Gingrich interviews the Governor of Puerto Rico:

Governor Fortuño: ...When I became governor, we had been experiencing the worst and deepest recession since the 30s. It commenced two full years before it started in the rest of the country. We're starting to come out of it. Secondly, I faced the largest state budget deficit, proportionally speaking, in the country. It was 45% of our state budget. We didn't have money to meet our first payroll. We had to rush legislation through our state legislature to be able to pay and meet that payroll. On top of that, the state government owed suppliers of goods and services over $1.3 billion on top of the almost $3.5 billion deficit. We paid up all that money, we brought down from 45% to 30% that budget deficit, and now with the new budget that is being approved as we speak, it will come down to 12% of our budget and we'll balance our budget in the first term. But on top of that, I'll do away with a lot of special interest deductions and credits and what have you, and we'll be lowering income taxes across the board this year, which is going against the current of what's happening in Washington.


"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne
by maracatu on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 12:12:36 PM EST
This paints a very interesting scenario:  A likely consequence of the recession, mentioned by the Governor, has been that Puerto Ricans, possessing US citizenship, have moved to the (mainland) USA.  The period referred to by the Governor has also seen the historic migratory trend that has for the first time ever placed more Puerto Ricans on the mainland US (around four million) than actually live on the island (around three and a half million).

This presents an interesting conundrum for the US political class:  If our current neoliberal Governor does not manage to reverse the trend and create more jobs that Puerto Ricans will actually want to take, then the migratory trend will intensify, which is something the US political class (including the Republicans) does NOT want, given the whole south-of-the-border Hispanic immigration issued that is currently on fire in the US.  Hence I see the US political class (including the Republicans, mind you!) willing to spend money in order to stem the migratory flow and keep Puerto Ricans on the island!

That is my profound analysis for the day.
:^D

"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne

by maracatu on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 12:27:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]

All the jazz musicians left in N'awlins will appreciate this from San Franciscan Billy Philadelphia.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 01:27:03 PM EST
Breaking News (BreakingNews) on Twitter
Judge blocks offshore drilling moratorium imposed by Obama administration after Gulf spill - AP


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 01:49:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It seems like 100,000 barrels a day isn't enough. Drill baby drill

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 02:56:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
  1. Has anyone seen a reliable estimate of the volume/mass of the oil pool that has been tapped into?

  2. EXACTLY HOW does a relief well work?


They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Wed Jun 23rd, 2010 at 07:27:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
  1. See here:
    The prospect may have held 50 million barrels (7.9×10^6 m3) producible reserves of oil.

  2. Migeru:
    See this comment by Nomad


By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 23rd, 2010 at 08:57:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you.  Hope this info is accurate.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Wed Jun 23rd, 2010 at 02:09:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So, yeah. While driving me betsy Sunday, I heard a solemn ditty about the decision of the US Supreme Court about the case, Holder v. Humanitarian Law Project, sung by a legal analyst who was interviewed by an NPR functionary, the personal names of whom I've forgotten now.

ANYWAY, the fellow claimed petitioner Fertig assayed a noble plea on behalf of members of non-governmental organizations, dedicated to facilitating peaceful resolution of conflicts, but the justices apprehended any interference in matters of state interest --either known or unknown-- amounts to sedition. A vicious and obdurate jurisprudence dictates that US federal government officers occupy the center of the universe of lawful action.

Turley summarized the insane explanation of the panelists: "Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote the majority opinion and agreed that material support includes giving intangible assistance to groups labeled by the State Department as terrorist organizations. Roberts noted "[s]uch support frees up other resources within the organization that may be put to violent ends . . . It also importantly [sic] helps lend legitimacy to foreign terrorist groups; legitimacy that makes it easier for those groups to persist, to recruit members and to raise funds; all of which facilitate more terrorist attacks....

"Solicitor General Elena Kagan argued the [US] case herself, but took such an extremist position that even Roberts balked: 'The government is wrong that the only thing actually at issue in this litigation is conduct' and not speech."

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 02:50:43 PM EST
Perfectly bonkers. It surely drives a cart and horse through freedom of expression.

It gives the govt the right to declare you a terrorist if you are against any aspect of US foreign policy whatsoever. Bush would never have taken any crap over Padilla if he could have gotten away with that.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 02:55:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So where are all those outraged people who would be complaining if anyone even breathed on the second amendment?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 03:43:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are brown people sneaking into the US!

Much more important.

Besides, if you're not doing anything wrong you don't have anything to fear.  Right?


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 03:58:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the justices apprehended any interference in matters of state interest --either known or unknown-- amounts to sedition.

JFC.

What cannot be "matters of state interest?"  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 03:57:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My vagina and uterus.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 04:02:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh now surely that depends what you want to do with them

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 04:08:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 Well, no.

What I want is an intangible act, but what I do is a tangible act. In this decision the majority of the US Supreme Court represents that the power, an authoritative coercion, of state agents is boundless, when it warrantees the license of a bureaucrat not only to speak but to think for another and to arrest another before commission of any alleged crime --in this case, mere communication with a state enemy-- or due process by adjudication.

See doctrine of habeus corpus,  including but not limited to prior restraint.

I am not nonplussed to find I agree with Kagan's defense of the limitation of state authority is illegal conduct. I am nonplussed to find anyone would characterized this defense "extremist" given that evidently actions define the boundary of law enforcement hat Roberts et al. deliberately trespass.

To restrict motive, association, speech, commerce, and charity.

Am I free? I am not property; I am not an inanimate object or a tool. My vagina and uterus are not severable properties of my person any more than either arms, kidneys, or eyes; were I to be blinded again tomorrow, my eyes would still denote my self. My will to comply with common law proscribes the state's putative interest in my vagina and uterus by my explicit, tangible conduct, to the extent my vagina and uterus, not yours, affects a present (not future), material (not intellectual) harm upon the state which is personified by society, every other natural or legal person.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 05:28:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't you be so sure.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 04:16:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why not? I'm 46.
I have decided, I decide, I will decide
how to dispose of my vagina and uterus.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 05:45:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Surely providing the next generation of cannon fodder is of state interest.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 04:34:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
la lucha segue

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 05:46:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't know what that means


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 08:21:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The beat goes on.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Jun 23rd, 2010 at 01:23:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That would be la lucha sigue. A segue is a smooth transition from one topic or section to the next.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jun 23rd, 2010 at 02:27:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The struggle (fight, battle) continues.

la lucha sigue --my typo-- corrected is searchable.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Jun 26th, 2010 at 07:24:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
For the third time in two years, I sat on a train that hit someone. This time it was with a railjet, and passengers had to stay in the train while police & ambulance came for the cleanup. (The conductor said that the victim first ran across the tracks, then jumped back in front of the train -- either it was an idiot who dropped something or a suicide jumper with temporary doubts...)

It seems I am jaded now -- I was more shocked by what I heard on the way back.

I got off at the next station because the delay meant I missed my goal, and boarded the two hours delayed railjet in the opposite direction. On the way we stopped and took on the Budapest-destined passengers of an also delayed local train, including a grandmother with four children under four. And what do I hear her telling them? "Watch out, maybe we can glimpse the accident!"...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 03:36:17 PM EST
Possibly they were just told there was an accident and assumed it was some goods vehicles off the track

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 03:49:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Trains over here hit cars all the time, because we have thousands of unprotected grade crossings. (250,000 according to http://www.techtransfer.berkeley.edu/newsletter/04-4/tracks.php)

I got out and looked at the front of our engine after one such crash, and there was a small scratch on it; the car had been pretty much demolished. The size of a train locomotive is difficult to comprehend...

http://www.wickedlocal.com/salem/news/x1772937947/Rail-deaths-take-psychological-toll-on-train-crews

by asdf on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 09:24:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of the minor consequences of switching from steam to diesel. With steam the forward vision was restricted and so, signals apart, not monitored to the same extent. Much of the time, they wouldn't even have been aware till they finished a shift, and possibly not even then.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 23rd, 2010 at 04:35:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Is the media bringing down the euro? | Al Jazeera Blogs

Has the media exacerbated the eurozone crisis?

Sitting in Athens, that is a question I've asked myself many times in recent months.

Certainly, there are people close to George Papandreou, the Greek prime minister, who complain bitterly about the reporting of Greece's economic woes by what they call "the Anglo-Saxon press" (which, in a pantheon of villains, is apparently right up there with greedy speculators and unscrupulous hedge-fund managers).

Their argument goes as follows: parts of the British press have always distrusted the euro and have repeatedly predicted the failure of the single currency. The eurosceptics have waited for this moment, and now they smell blood. One example: this opinion piece in the Daily Telegraph.

Or look at this blog post from the Economist, which somebody close to Papandreou described to me as essential reading, as it supports the Greek theory of widespread schadenfreude in the British press, and suggests that even the BBC (certainly not beloved by eurosceptics) has gotten carried away by the prevailing mood.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 03:52:38 PM EST
Getting my butt in gear to buy a Linux based software development system.  A company up in Los Alamos is offering a Fedora implementation for around $900 on state-of-the-art hardware.

Anybody have any religious dogmas deep insights?

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 04:33:47 PM EST
I don't like redhat-based systems, I am much more comfortable on debian-based systems. That rules out fedora.

YMMV

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 05:44:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Since my last exposure to Unix was the 1985 BSD release running on a Dec VAX My Mileage is of No Value.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Tue Jun 22nd, 2010 at 08:23:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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