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A second week of Japanese disaster

by ceebs Sat Mar 19th, 2011 at 10:46:38 PM EST

As we start another week of recovery from the Japanese disaster, there are several things we can say, firstly it has been a terrible disaster: the death toll is still rising, and will be for several more days as bodies are recovered from the mangled wreckage, and people begin to realise that those who are unfound will more and more likely be moved over into a column marked lost.


Another thing we can say is there are thousands of unacknowledged heroes, civil engineers who designed buildings that didn't fall down, Technicians who designed and built the Tsunami warning system, Emergency planners who had worked on routes to safe ground in the path of a tsunami and signposted them.

Architects and builders who hadn't scrimped on materials and shaved the odd dollar off the bill just to put some extra cash in their pockets and so provided buildings that would turn into death traps under the influence of shaken earth. Politicians who pushed through these things rather the instant gratification of the quick tax cut for electoral gain. All of these people helped prevent what was a disaster becoming a much greater catastrophe and so deserve our applause for the lives that they saved.

the next week will be full of stories of families reunited, temporary housing constructed, food and supplies delivered, and wreckage cleared as the full emergency system swings into effect. Hopefully as well we can say the Nuclear problem is finally, brought fully under control. Only then will we be in a situation when we can truly begin to answer whether there were things we could and should have done differently to minimise the effects when something like this happens again.

Japan threads:

Display:
Naked capitalism - Is nuclear power worth the risk?

One of the interesting features during the Fukushima reactor crisis were the fistfights that broke out in comments between the defenders of nuclear power and the opponents. The boosters argued that the worst case scenario problems were overblown, both in terms of estimation of the odds of occurrence and the likely consequences. The critics contended that nuclear power was not economical ex massive subsidies, that there was no "safe" method of waste disposal, and that nuclear plants were always subject to corners-cutting, both in design and operation, so the ongoing hazards were greater than they appeared.

Reader Crocodile Chuck passed along a story from the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, "The Lessons of Fukushima", by anthropologist Hugh Gusterson. Here is the key section:



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Mar 19th, 2011 at 10:48:57 PM EST
KYODO - 1st water sprayed at Fukushima's No. 4 reactor  

Japanese authorities shot water into a spent-fuel pool of the reactor No. 4 of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant Sunday for the first time since the reactor's cooling system failed following last week's powerful earthquake.

The operator also stepped up efforts to reactivate the cooling system of the reactors No. 1 and 2 as power cables were connected to them, but the International Atomic Energy Agency chief indicated it was premature to have an optimistic view on the future of the troubled plant.

The Ground Self-Defense Force sprayed about 80 tons of water from a vehicle into the pool for nearly one hour until 9:30 a.m., according to the Defense Ministry.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Mar 19th, 2011 at 10:51:49 PM EST
TEPCO : Press Release | Plant Status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (as of 2:00 PM Mar 20th)
Cooling of spent fuel pools
- In Unit 3, water discharge by Self-Defense Force's helicopters was
  conducted from 9:48 AM in the morning on March 17th. Also water
  discharge by the riot police's high-pressure water cannon trucks and
  Self-Defense Force's fire engines was conducted from 7PM on March
  17th and finished at 8:09PM.
- In Unit 3, water discharge by Self-Defense Force's fire engines and
  US army's fire engines was conducted from 2 PM and completed a quarter
  to 3 PM.
- After that, from 0:30 AM, Mar 19th, water discharge by Tokyo Fire
  Department's Hyper Rescue was conducted to Unit 3 and completed at
  1:10 AM. At around 2:10PM, water discharge by Tokyo Fire Department's
  Hyper Rescue to Unit 3 was conducted once again. At approximately 3:40
  am, they had finished water discharge.
- At approximately 8:21 am, March 20th, water discharge to Unit 4 by
  fire engine has started with the cooperation of Self-Defense Forces.
- We are considering further water discharge at Unit 3 and others
  subject to the conditions of spent fuel pools.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:05:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The 6:00 pm local time update, still in Japanese only, say 40 tons were sprayed into the spent fuel pond of No. 2, too.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:11:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
Japan's Self-Defense Force has concluded Sunday's water-spraying operation to cool the storage pool of spent fuel in the Number 4 reactor at the quake-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

The operation was carried out in 2 parts, one in the morning and the other in the afternoon.

The second operation ended before 8PM.

The Defense Ministry says more than 100 tons of water has been discharged, and much of it reached inside the reactor building.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:16:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English

The Tokyo Fire Department resumed high-pressure hosing of the Number 3 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant at 9:30 PM on Sunday.

The operation is expected to continue for about 6 hours.

Water was discharged into the facility's spent fuel-rod pool for 13-and-a-half hours until 3:40 AM on Sunday.

Sunday, March 20, 2011 20:48 +0900 (JST)

I don't remember reading anywhere why they think No. 3 is more critical than No. 4. Perhaps there is a leak from the pond?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:17:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A graphical overview of spraying operations and connecting works from Asahi Shimbun:



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:33:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't remember reading anywhere why they think No. 3 is more critical than No. 4.

#3 is the only reactor/spent fuel pool that contains MOX fuel with plutonium.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 03:42:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
Tokyo Electric Power Company says radiation levels around the compound at its Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant are on the decline since water-spraying began in earnest on Saturday afternoon.

The company told reporters that the radiation level at the plant's headquarters building, located some 500 meters northeast of the No. 3 reactor, dropped to 2,625 microsieverts per hour at 8:30 on Sunday morning.

The reading shows a drop of more than 800 microsieverts from 18 hours ago--about the time the water-spraying at the No.3 reactor began.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:27:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I wonder if this will prompt a second edition of the popular "Power to Save The World" by Gwyneth Cravens, which explained in great, tedious detail how none of what just happened could possibly happen. I suppose that with a few minor edits, this particular sequence of events could be explained away...
by asdf on Sat Mar 19th, 2011 at 11:45:10 PM EST
NHK - Cabinet secretary says troubled uke plant will be shut eventually

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:13:30 AM EST
Japan earthquake | Page 159 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Kyodo news agency now reporting that TEPCO engineers have restored power at the No.2 reactor at the stricken Fukushima plant.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:36:02 AM EST
Japan earthquake | Page 159 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
NHK public TV reporting that an 80-year-old woman and 16-year-old youth were found alive on Sunday under the rubble in the Japanese city of Ishinomaki in northeast Japan, nine days after the region was devastated by the massive earthquake and tsunami.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:37:15 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
Police in Miyagi Prefecture say rescue workers heard a voice and found the 16-year-old boy on top of the roof of his collapsed house. The boy told them that his 80-year-old grandmother was in the house and couldn't get out by herself.

The 2 were pulled up by rope to a police helicopter that took them to a Red Cross hospital in the city.

Rescuers say the woman was unable to move because her legs were trapped by what appeared to be a refrigerator.

The boy also could not go very far because their house was surrounded by debris.

A doctor at the Red Cross hospital said the woman and the boy told him that they had survived by eating yogurt and other food in the fridge.

The boy said he made phone calls to his mother but eventually lost contact. He also said no rescuers came, so he climbed to the roof and waved to a passing helicopter.

The doctor says the boy has a low body temperature of 28 degrees Celsius and no sensation in his left leg.
The grandmother is unharmed and can converse with other people.

The 2 were found in an area about 1 kilometer upstream of the mouth of a river. Houses in the area were swept away by the tsunami.

Sunday, March 20, 2011 19:04 +0900 (JST)

Good for them. There is a video in the link.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:24:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 159 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Jiji news agency reports that Japan's Kansai Electric Power to spend 50 billion yen ($619 million) to 100 billion yen ($1.2 billion) on tsunami protection measures.

A separate report from Kyodo news agency says that Kansai Electric plans to postpone the reopening of the Takahama and Mihama nuclear plants.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:38:05 AM EST
BBC News - Japan: Miyagi prefecture death toll 'may reach 15,000'

Police in Japan say 15,000 people may have been killed in a single prefecture, Miyagi, by the huge quake and tsunami which struck nine days ago.

The announcement came as the official death toll rose to 8,133, with 12,272 people missing



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:40:28 AM EST
Japan earthquake | Page 159 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Some progress has been made in the effort to prevent Fukushima No.3 reactor from worsening, according to a Japanese government official.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:48:12 AM EST
TEPCO : Press Release | Plant Status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (as of 2:00 PM Mar 20th)
- At approximately 6:15AM on March 17th the pressure of the Suppression
  Chamber has temporarily increased. We were preparing to implement a
  measurement to reduce the pressure of the reactor containment vessel
  (partial discharge of air containing radioactive material to outside)
  in order to fully secure safety. However, at present, it is not a
  situation to take a measure immediately to discharge air containing
  radioactive material to outside now. We will continue to monitor the
  status of the pressure of the reactor containment vessel.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:03:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
The Tokyo Electric Power Company has decided against releasing gases from the overheating No. 3 reactor in an attempt to reduce pressure inside the containment vessel.

TEPCO officials in Fukushima said on Sunday afternoon that pressure within the reactor containment vessel has begun to stabilize, and gases don't need to be released for the time being.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:18:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
http://xkcd.com/radiation/

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:57:50 AM EST
Excellent chart. Thanks.

I wrote the following prelude for sending that chart to friends and family. The chatty style is on purpose. Can anyone see areas that need help with corrections or simple additions or edits? I'm not sure whether to add links, or just leave it since anyone who wants links will easily find them, while the target audience will get thrown by them....yay nay?
-----

Things that are missing from this excellent chart (they seem to presume that we know);

The American public is used to hearing radiation amounts in units of rem. The International Standard unit 'sievert' (named after Mr. and Mrs. Sievert's son Rolf) equals 100 rem - the reverse of that is that 1 rem equals 1/100th of a sievert. (Standards units named after people are not capitalized when spelled out, but when abbreviated are capitalized. So frequencies such as 60 cycles per second is equal to 60 Hz. The same is true of the standards named for the sons of Mr. and Mrs Watt and Bell and many others, and of course the Mr. and Mrs. Curie team. Of course, an International Standards unit - abbreviated "SI" - will be capitalized at the beginning of a sentence as usual.)

µSv is a microsievert and mSv is a millisievert. Micro- is a decimal point and 5 zeros then the number, milli- is a decimal point and 2 zeros then the number.

When speaking of doses allowed, time is a consideration. Some allowable doses are measured in hours, some in days, some in yearly amounts.

Different parts of the body also react differently to the same amount of radiation. For example, reproductive organs are 20 times more sensitive than skin and the surface of bone, while bone marrow, colon, lung, and stomach are 12 times more sensitive and bladder, breast, liver, esophagus, thyroid, and similar others are 5 times more sensitive than the skin. The allowable doses are therefore given as an average.

There is also the consideration of location and chance. A source that is external to the body loses its power over the cells according to the inverse square principle, which simply means that the strength decreases as distance increases, by a predictable amount. At double the distance the strength is 1/4. Triple the distance and the strength is 1/9.

The chance of mutations occurring is higher as a cell divides. There is a lot of cell division going on and a lot of radiation from many sources, so obviously circumstances have to be exactly 'right' for a mutation to happen, or our bodies would be just composed of mutated jello. Some mutations kill a newly divided cell...no problem, the body can often deal with that. It is a rare occasion when all the circumstances go wrong.

There would obviously be worse odds if radiated material were inside the body rather than outside. Thus, the focus on unnatural radiation from food. Yet, remember that some food naturally contains radiation; the joke near the bottom of this chart refers to the radiation ingested by eating one banana, which is equal to 0.0001 mSv. This is because of the high concentration of potassium in a banana. Fortunately the body has evolved to regulate potassium efficiently, storing it in muscles but eliminating the type that isn't needed. But this is not true for the body and all radiation sources, but it is true of some sources. Like all these topics, condensing it into a simple paragraph loses a lot of nuance and hard-won knowledge.

While detection equipment is incredibly sensitive and while the wind blows slightly radiated particles around, numbers need to be averaged. Incredibly small amounts of radiation are everywhere. But it should not be forgotten that a segment of the Ukraine the size of Switzerland is off-limits to humans and agriculture for generations (perhaps centuries) because large concentrations of small pieces of radioactive materials were allowed to uncontrollably concentrate. Such concentrations haven't only happened in the two most famous places. The history of small reactors contaminating environments and killing workers range from the Santa Susanna Pass (perhaps the first reactor to go into "partial nuclear meltdown, and perhaps releasing more radiated materials into the atmosphere than the Three Mile Island incident 20 years later) to McMurdo Bay, though because they are usually military controlled they are not well documented or known about.

To summarize, little things shouldn't cause panic as these charts show, but the effects of concentrations of little things on the body should not be nay-sayed either.

Never underestimate their intelligence, always underestimate their knowledge.

Frank Delaney ~ Ireland

by siegestate (siegestate or beyondwarispeace.com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 10:12:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Someone with more expertise on this issue than me, please jump all over me if what i'm posting is wrong.

I"m led to believe there remains contested debate amongst true experts regarding the "facts" of ionizing radiation and its effect on the body, perhaps on the ecosphere. xkcd's charts are an excellent overview, but include many points presented as clear and known "boxes," micro-Sieverts, which are actually still under debate. the majority of sources have a stake in the nuclear debate, and there's a whole host of research which holds some of these "accepted" numbers as simply wrong.

In fact, the state-of-the-art of discussion regarding ionizing radiation demands a diary of its own. (Again, i claim no expertise, nor do i regularly review new literature.)

The take-away should be there are far greater unknowns than the chart would have you believe. What i would wish is that some of the experts would use the chart as a basis for discussion, and we could monitor the debate.

I can state my own bias, that ionizing radiation is far more dangerous than corporate science presents, or at the minimum there is far too much unknown to act as if this is a mature science. And i call bullshit on the idea that an accumulation of potassium radiation from bananas has any real meaning when compared to a nuclear accident.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:14:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Perhaps i should offer a bit more clarity.

Accepted radiation science comes from the same school which allows poisoning of groundwater and topsoil, spreading throughout the food chain, and claims to be heavily involved in the fight to eradicate cancer. the same science which demonizes tobacco without funding any studies on the effect of burning the 500+ chemicals found in modern cigarettes.

The same "science" which allows diesel engines and coal plants, while soliciting billions/yr in cancer research funds. Which hammers home the points that we are irradiated when we fly, while keeping secret the effects of using depleted uranium to pierce armor.

If there was ever a time to be watchful, neigh vigilant, of the spin on the entire nuclear cycle, it is now.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:32:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the same science which demonizes tobacco without funding any studies on the effect of burning the 500+ chemicals found in modern cigarettes.

You probably mean the 599 additives, because tobacco alone includes an extreme variety of harmful chemicals, and burning biomass (not just tobacco) produces a lot more. Read this report, which discusses insufficient (but non-zero) research on the effect of additives (p. 44-45). Several harmful chemicals found in the tobacco plant or its burn products, from the most carcinogenic hydrocarbons to the most poisonous heavy metals, are discussed on the previous pages. Later pages discuss other influencing factors, like cigarette paper and temperature and method of puffing. If anything, more research into the effect of cigarette additives when smoked will add to an already bad picture.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 12:17:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Consequently, actual exposures to and doses of components of smoke cannot be derived from values obtained with machine smoking.

The purpose of my comment was to comment on studies of ionizing radiation and the various biases within accepted science. Let's address cigarettes in another forum.

Despite some perhaps throwaway literary licenses, I wish to remain focused on radiation. Because we all respect the brilliant, intelligent humor of xkcd, we need to focus on the meme presented. and its shortfalls.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 12:43:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Despite some perhaps throwaway literary licenses, I wish to remain focused on radiation.

Your throwaway literary license included an implied complete dismissal of research derived from uncertainties in one sub-field, suggesting an exaggeration of the harmful effects of tobacco smoke (and now you added to it before saying we shouldn't debate it here). Your claim about radiation is of playing down the effects.

Regarding some science on the effects of ionizing radiation and their dismissal by certain forums of acceptable science, there are examples in my Chernobyl's Downplayed Victims, including the brain and blood vessel damage.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 01:13:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was not playing down the effects of radiation, quite the contrary.  But i'm barely awake now, so save discussion for later.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:51:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 159 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Japan Health Ministry says radiation levels exceeded safety standards in Fukushima, Ibaragi prefectures


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 09:04:38 AM EST
Map from Asahi Shimbun:

The numbers reduced compared to yesterday. Data for the town with the highest value, Namie (30 km NW from the plant) is only in the accompanying text: 110 μSv/h (down from 136 μSv/h). The highest values on the map are Itate village (12.40, down from around 20 μSv/h) and Fukushima city itself (8.54, down from 9.80 μSv/h).

This all looks like the slow decay of already present contamination, with the area NW of the plant worst-hit.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 12:39:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Contamination level comparisons in another unit, Becquerels (decays per second) per square metre:

In the current fallout:

  • Caesium-137: up to 84 Bq/m² a day (18 March, Tochigi prefecture)
  • Iodine-131: up to 1,300 Bq/m² a day (Tochigi prefecture on the 18th)

For comparison:
  • Caesium in Chernobyl fallout landing in Ibaraki prefecture: 130 Bq/m² or about 4.3 Bq/m² a day
  • Caesium in the fallout from 1960 nuclear testing landing on Tokyo: and a month of 500 Bq/m² or about 17 Bq/m² a day


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 12:55:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 159 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Japan nuclear operator says that it may take several days to connect power to No. 3 and No. 4 reactors


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 09:29:50 AM EST
Fukushima reactors showing improvement: gov't | Reuters
(Reuters) - Reactors at stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant were showing some improvement but the situation remains uncertain, Tetsuro Fukuyama, Japan's deputy chief cabinet secretary, told reporters on Sunday.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 09:30:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
USPACOM - United States Pacific Command
  • Yokota continued receiving and delivering supplies vital to continuing humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations throughout Japan to include delivering Marines and chemical suits to Yamagata, fuel to Sendai, medical supplies to Hanamaki and Sendai, a FARP mission to Yamagata, delivery of 5 pallets of Boron to Fukushima.
  • USAF MC-130 delivered 72K  pounds of JP-8 to Yamagata
  • USAF 5x C-130 delivered Boron to Hyakuri/blankets to Sendai/fuel to Misawa
  • USAF MC-130: 5 pallets of water from Atsugi to Matsushima
  • Royal Australian Air Force C-17 transported Japan Ground Self Defense Force pax/supplies/trucks from Kadena to Misawa
  • Sendai Airport is now cleared, and expect to receive C-17s soon. USAF Spec Ops cleared the tsunami stricken airfield and brought it back on-line in less than one week.
  • Yokota Aircraft (UH-1, C-12) are supporting DOE efforts to gather radiological data around the Fukushima nuclear plant. 
  • Yokota delivered fuel bladders and gasoline to sustain Misawa AB ops.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 10:12:57 AM EST
Sky News - AP: Japanese Health Ministry finds additional types of radiation-tainted vegetables following leak from Fukushima plant

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:00:32 AM EST
and itsin more places, not sure where though

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:01:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 161 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
: Temperatures at all spent fuel pools at Fukushima plant below 100 C: Kitazawa


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:03:47 AM EST
Which ones? These:

NHK WORLD English

Tokyo Electric Power Company says cooling functions were restored by Sunday evening for the No.5 and No.6 reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Coolant water temperatures have now fallen below 100 degrees Celsius.

... TEPCO restored the cooling functions of the No.5 reactor on Sunday afternoon using the emergency diesel engine generator of the No.6 reactor, which escaped damage from the quake and tsunami.

The cooling function of the No.6 reactor was restored by 7:30 PM.

Sunday, March 20, 2011 23:46 +0900 (JST)



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:14:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorry, the above are apparently the reactor temperatures. Earlier:

NHK WORLD English

The power company measured the water temperature of the spent fuel pool in the No.5 reactor and found it had decreased from 68.8 degrees Celsius at 5 AM Saturday to 43.1 degrees at 3 AM Sunday.

After the cooling pump at the No. 6 reactor was restored, the water temperature dropped more than 15 degrees, from 67.5 degrees Celsius at 11PM Saturday to 52 degrees at 3 AM Sunday.

On the other hand, the water temperature of the reactor vessels is rising.

The water temperature was 194.5 degrees Celsius in the No.5 reactor and 152.4 degrees in the No. 6 reactor at 6 PM Saturday.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:26:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Disaster in Japan Live Blog: March 21  Al Jazeera

1:24am Defence Minister Kitazawa told NHK that the surface temperatures above the reactors of the quake-hit Fukushima nuclear power plant give comfort.

The temperatures are:

Reactor 1 - 58 degrees

Reactor 2 - 35 degrees

Reactor 3 - 62 degrees

Reactor 4 - 42 degrees

Reactor 5 - 24 degrees

Reactor 6 - 25 degrees.

The temperature above the containment vessel itself of Reactor 3 is 128 degrees, but this is not cause for concern, he says.

Reposted from previous blog. Note that the readings are from the SDF, made per the request of PM Kan.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 04:12:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
<does a little dance>

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:21:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Stabilisation at Fukushima Daiichi

The Fukushima power plants were required by regulators to withstand a certain height of tsunami. At the Daiichi plant the design basis was 5.7 metres and at Daini this was 5.2 metres.

 

Tepco has now released tentative assessments of the scale of the tsunami putting it at over 10 metres at Daiichi and over 12 metres at Dainii.

The plant sites were inundated, causing the loss of residual heat removal systems at both sites as well as emergency diesel generators at Daiichi.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 11:39:49 AM EST
When was the last recorded tsunami in Japan higher than 6m?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:22:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
1993. That was the textbook example of a tsunami before the Indonesia one.

EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI OF JULY 12, 1993 IN THE SEA OF JAPAN/EAST SEA - Dr. George Pararas-Carayannis

The west and southern coasts of Okushiri Island were struck by waves that exceeded 20 meters in many locations. There was extensive damage to ships, houses and structures. In a small valley near the harbor town of Monai, the maximum tsunami wave runup height was documented to be as much as 31 meters.

That was on a small island close to the epicenter, though: on the mainland and Russia, the tsunami was at most 4 m high. However, before that, from the same site:

JAPAN - Earthquake and Tsunami of 26 May 1983 in the Sea of Japan - by Dr. George Pararas-Carayannis

Tsunami Wave Heights - Estimated tsunami heights were 14 meters at Minehama, Honshu, 2-6 meters along southern Hokkaido and northern Honshu, up to 8 meters along the coast of Russia (USSR at the time), and ranged between 2-7.5 meters along the coast of South Korea.

Though, again, the peaks above 5 m were owed to special circumstances, including a peninsula that I again remember being mentioned as textbook example of focused tsunami waves.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 06:08:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The 1946 Nankaidō earthquake....also caused a huge tsunami that took out another 2,100 homes with its 5-6-metre (16-20-foot).
1933: Showa Sanriku, Japan< Although the earthquake did little damage, the associated tsunami, which was recorded to reach the height of 28.7 metres....Especially hard hit was the coastal village of Taro (now part of Miyako city) in Iwate Prefecture, which lost 42% of its total population and 98% of its buildings. Taro is now protected by an enormous tsunami wall, currently 10 meters in height and over 2 kilometers long. (Which did not protected it from this most recent tsunami.)

1896: Meiji Sanriku, Japan  was highly destructive, (Magnitude 7.2), generating one of the most devastating tsunamis in Japanese history....Wave heights of up to 38.2 meters (125 ft) were measured.... The magnitude of the tsunami (Mt = 8.2) was much greater than expected for the estimated seismic magnitude and this earthquake has been regarded as being part of a distinct class of events, a tsunami earthquake.

1854: Nankai, Tokai, and Kyushu Japan 8.4...in Wakayama Prefecture, Earthquake generated a maximum wave of 28 meters at Kochi, Japan...

So the design standard was for the most recent large tsunami near that particular location?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 10:41:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As I indicated in my own reply, maximum heights aren't the best standard: maximum heights emerge at special locations which focus the waves.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 11:20:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It should have been possible in the '60s to create a scale model of the sea floor off Honshu out beyond the subduction zone and then to simulate the displacement of various earthquake events. I know that acoustical consultants I worked for in the early 70s had created such models for auditoria and then studied them with small sources and microphones to evaluate the response of various shapes.

The Japan Trench is approximately 9,000 meters deep, so a scale of 1 to a thousand would give a max depth of 9 meters and a length and width of 200 meters. This should have been within the capability of the Japanese Govenment, or even TEPCO, had they chosen to make such a study. There may be problems of scaling the activity of water on a scale of 1000:1, but I suspect useful information could have been derived as to what size tsunami could be expected where. Just create ocean floor movements corresponding to category 9 quakes at various places along the model trench line and see what happens.

If something like this was done, I would say that they had done their due dilligence.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 09:27:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From what I've gathered, doing modeling anything like that is pretty difficult today, with modern computers - let alone in the 60's.  And I don't think tabletop scale models work at all, due to issues with pressure and volume and whatnot.

But I'm just guessing.  

by Zwackus on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 02:26:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I read in Google translates that around Sendai (near the nuclear plant), tsunami retaining walls were scaled for 3.3 m waves and were 5 m high. Upthread somewhere, the nuclear plants' wall height was quoted, it was more. These must obviously be based on some calculations. I suspect that the failure of tsunami height prediction here was of the magnitude of the earthquake (we saw earlier that the official estimate put the risk of a 9.0 in this segment low).

Regarding my point, I want to stress it again: if a bay or the sides of a peninsula focus tsunami waves, then at those locations, wave heights can reach the triple or more of what they reach along straight shores, so local records during a historical tsunami aren't good advice to calculate what height is needed for protection along the entire shore.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 02:43:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The coastline in the region of the Fukushima plants is very straight, so no wave focusing there.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 03:13:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Energy must be dissipated further in the sea... It won't reduce the sheer swelling, but will limit the crests height of the wave.
Walls (as seen in France) have the major problem that they are usually too low for the waves coming in and usually much to high to allow the water to get out afterwards ! Thus leaving seawater on agricultural soil for several months...

There are systems (usually repetitive horizontal slabs) to dampen the wave frequency, coupled with chicaned walls that would allow for a better management of tsunamis... Specially in case of shore located nuclear plants !

All those are quite old in design (though new calculus gives them a better rentability) and one can wonder why those systems aren't more widely used (after all it's just plain old concrete slabs) ?

Of course the idea to build those plants directly at sea (offshore) and immersed (for the plant being then watertight, useful as you search for leaks in normal use) hasn't yet been a path of design.

The point is that once you get offshore it's easier (and safer) to get a Stirling engine plant with the delta t° between surface and depth temperature...!

"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 09:27:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Regarding my point...

Agreed with your point. The presence or absence of focusing features MUST be considered for any specific location. But even in the 1960s the shoreline and seafloor topology was pretty well known for Japan. So therefore, for a stretch of shore line like Sendai historical records should be consulted for the average heights of tsunamis in areas without focusing features and then a healthy margin of safety should be applied for the case of a nuclear power plant. That likely would have resulted in a significantly higher wall at Sendai, as the detailed historical record would likely show 5 to 6 meter tsunamis in this area.

But TEPCO likely functioned as an arm of G.E. in all of this and GE likely did not want to have the cost of even a six meter sea wall added to the cost of constructing the plant. They wanted to sell reactor cores and "expertise". Given the US corporate attitude towards risk during the '60s I would expect that the advice given by G.E. would have been to minimize the issue of tsunami dangers and put the responsibility for protecting from them on the whole society via the national government.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 10:56:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That likely would have resulted in a significantly higher wall at Sendai, as the detailed historical record would likely show 5 to 6 meter tsunamis in this area.

None of the average tsunami heights I dug up were that high. I really think that the 3.3 m value was based on historical maximums. In the 2011 tsunami, wave heights above 10 m were measured along straight shores like at Sendai or Fukushima, and in excess of 20 m on some locations in bays.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 11:30:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
On further consideration, the whole theory of plate tectonics was just emerging in the 1960s so the accepted understanding of the Pacific "ring of fire", was subsequent. But there had been the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964, which was a 9.2. Without economic considerations, assuming a maximum earthquake of 9.0 would have been prudent, given the history of large quakes in Japan. But that may well have precluded the construction of the plant at that location.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 12:12:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As of 11:00 pm local time (3:00 pm CET),

  • confirmed dead: 8,450
  • registered missing: 12,909
  • injured: 2,701
  • buildings found completely destroyed (by earthquake & tsunami): 14,637
  • buildings found burned down: 149


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 12:23:42 PM EST
NHK WORLD English
The Tokyo Electric Power Company has decided against releasing gases from the overheating No. 3 reactor in an attempt to reduce pressure inside the containment vessel.

TEPCO officials in Fukushima said on Sunday afternoon that pressure within the reactor containment vessel has begun to stabilize, and gases don't need to be released for the time being.

They say they will closely monitor the situation.

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency announced earlier on Sunday that pressure inside the vessel is rising despite efforts to cool the reactor by spraying seawater inside it.

The agency said the pressure must be reduced to protect the containment vessel, which holds radioactive materials inside in the event of an accident.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 03:44:39 PM EST
IAEA: Some improvements in Japan nuclear situation | Reuters

(Reuters) - The U.N. atomic watchdog said on Sunday there had been some positive developments at Japan's disaster-hit nuclear power plant in the last 24 hours but that the overall situation remained very serious.

Graham Andrew, a senior official of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), also said radiation levels in major Japanese cities had not changed and remained below dangerous levels.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 03:46:15 PM EST
Disaster in Japan Live Blog: March 21 | Al Jazeera Blogs

Radioactivity from the nuclear accident in Fukushima has not contaminated food grown outside Japan, the UN atomic watchdog says. Graham Andrew, a senior official of the IAEA said:

Radioactivity from this emergency - I say on the advice of (UN agencies) FAO and WHO - has not affected food produced in any other country.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 04:24:32 PM EST
Japan - Fukushima: firefighters resume hosing unit 3 reactor http://bit.ly/hW92cM

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 05:29:47 PM EST
Japan Quake Map
The grey line at the top shows the moon illumination percentage (the top of the curve indicates a full moon, and the bottom a new moon), with the blue line showing the distance between Earth and the moon (the higher up the chart, the further away the moon is; the top of the curve indicates apogee and the bottom perigee). These metrics are shown here purely out of interest, to help you draw your own conclusions as to any correlation between the moon and earthquakes.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 07:47:00 PM EST
DailyYomiuri - SDF fire engines started spraying water on No. 4 reactor at Fukushima nuclear power plant just after 6:30 a.m. today.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 09:14:26 PM EST
Mission risky but a success / Firefighters conquer radiation fears to cool fuel rod pool : National : DAILY YOMIURI ONLINE (The Daily Yomiuri)

The Yomiuri Shimbun

Firefighters engaged in a special mission to spray water into a radiation-leaking storage pool of spent nuclear fuel rods at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant said they had to conquer their fears of radiation's "invisible threat" to accomplish the task.

Yasuo Sato, head of the Tokyo Fire Department's Fire Rescue Task Force attended a press conference held late Saturday with unit leaders Toyohiko Tomioka and Yukio Takayama to review the water spraying operation at the power plant's No. 3 reactor conducted earlier in the day.

When asked about the team's fears in accomplishing the task, Tomioka was momentarily lost for words. "The members displayed an impressively strong fighting spirit [during the mission]...," he said.

After a further pause, Tomioka, 47, then added: " I'm really sorry to have worried their families so much with this mission. I would like to take this opportunity to express my gratitude and apologize to each of the families."



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 09:18:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Disaster in Japan Live Blog: March 21 | Al Jazeera Blogs

Tsunami survivor Kiyoshi Hiratsuka searched all day for his much beloved Harley Davidson in the ruins of his hometown, Onagawa. The once vibrant fishing town was obliterated when the devastating tsunami that followed the earthquake converted it into a landscape of death and destruction.

Residents say half of the town's 10.000 people are gone.

Digging in the rubble of what was once his home, Hiratsuka eventually found the handlebars of his Harley sticking out from the debris. The 37-year-old mechanic explained his relief to Associated Press news agency at finding the bike, saying he wanted to keep it as a memorial to the losses suffered by Japan.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 09:19:50 PM EST
Reuters - Japan health ministry explains that residents in the region of Fukushima nuclear plant should refrain from drinking water due to high levels of radioactive iodine

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 20th, 2011 at 10:45:54 PM EST
NHK WORLD English

Grey smoke found from No.3 nuclear reactor

A local branch of the Tokyo Electric Power Company says grey smoke was seen rising from the troubled No.3 reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture.

The smoke was apparently coming from the southeast edge of the roof of the reactor structure at 3:55 PM on Monday.

The office informed local firefighters about this. The amount of smoke seems to be decreasing.

The reactor operator is evacuating its workers from the area.

The storage pool for spent nuclear fuel is located in the southeast area of the reactor structure.

Monday, March 21, 2011 17:17 +0900 (JST)

Meanwhile, this site aggregates all government radiation measurement data in English.

  • The latest "...by prefecture" one shows that levels rose again in Ibaraki prefecture (neighbours Fukushima) this morning.
  • The "...20 Km Zone..." ones have a map (page 7), with a lot more measuring points than in prior reports It's obvious that the most heavily contaminated area spreads along the mountains to the NW of the plant.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 05:49:52 AM EST
NHK WORLD English

Grey smoke from No.3 reactor subsided

The grey smoke seen coming from the troubled No.3 reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Monday afternoon has subsided.

The plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company, evacuated its workers from the plant shortly after 4 PM.

The government's nuclear safety agency said the smoke, which turned black and grey, subsided about 2 hours later.

It also said water levels and pressure inside the reactor have registered no major changes.

...Radiation levels at a spot about 500 meters northwest of the reactor were 2,015 microsieverts per hour, almost unchanged from the figure measured before the smoke was seen.

...Smoke was also seen rising from another troubled reactor Monday evening.

The government's nuclear safety agency says it was informed that white smoke was apparently coming from a crack in the roof of the No.2 reactor structure at 6:20 PM.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 11:13:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The latest Fukushima prefecture update at a Japanese government site gives two values for some locations: the police also did measurements. There are differences by a factor of two! (Usually the police's value is higher, but not always.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 04:41:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
but can't yet.  In any case, from Amory Lovins at RMI, HERE


Indeed, nuclear plants are so slow and costly to build that they reduce and retard climate protection.

Here's how. Each dollar spent on a new reactor buys about 2-10 times less carbon savings, 20-40 times slower, than spending that dollar on the cheaper, faster, safer solutions that make nuclear power unnecessary and uneconomic: efficient use of electricity, making heat and power together in factories or buildings ("cogeneration"), and renewable energy. The last two made 18% of the world's 2009 electricity (while nuclear made 13%, reversing their 2000 shares)--and made over 90% of the 2007-08 increase in global electricity production.

Those smarter choices are sweeping the global energy market. Half the world's new generating capacity in 2008 and 2009 was renewable. In 2010, renewables, excluding big hydro dams, won $151 billion of private investment and added over 50 billion watts (70% the total capacity of all 23 Fukushima-style U.S. reactors) while nuclear got zero private investment and kept losing capacity. Supposedly unreliable windpower made 43-52% of four (northern -CH) German states' total 2010 electricity. Non-nuclear Denmark, 21% windpowered, plans to get entirely off fossil fuels. Hawai'i plans 70% renewables by 2025.

In contrast, of the 66 nuclear units worldwide officially listed as "under construction" at the end of 2010, 12 had been so listed for over 20 years, 45 had no official startup date, half were late, all 66 were in centrally planned power systems--50 of those in just four (China, India, Russia, South Korea)--and zero were free-market purchases. Since 2007, nuclear growth has added less annual output than just the costliest renewable--solar power --and will probably never catch up. While inherently safe renewable competitors are walloping both nuclear and coal plants in the marketplace and keep getting dramatically cheaper, nuclear costs keep soaring, and with greater safety precautions would go even higher. Tokyo Electric Co., just recovering from $10-20 billion in 2007 earthquake costs at its other big nuclear complex, now faces an even more ruinous Fukushima bill.

Since 2005, new U.S. reactors (if any) have been 100+% subsidized--yet they couldn't raise a cent of private capital, because they have no business case. They cost 2-3 times as much as new windpower, and by the time you could build a reactor, it couldn't even beat solar power. Competitive renewables, cogeneration, and efficient use can displace all U.S. coal power more than 23 times over--leaving ample room to replace nuclear power's half-as-big-as-coal contribution too--but we need to do it just once. Yet the nuclear industry demands ever more lavish subsidies, and its lobbyists hold all other energy efforts hostage for tens of billions in added ransom, with no limit.

In the past, i've often differed with Amory about the methods to finance renewables (he loved big utility involvement, and despite that being current reality, i believed it would ultimately hurt renewable development.) But you can't quarrel with his numbers here. Reading from his blog post in total, i get a sense of hidden anger that it's taken so long, though perhaps that's because we've been fighting for sun and wind since the 70's, and that gets wearing.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 06:02:48 AM EST
Reuters- Jiji is reporting that Japan's nuclear safety agency says white smoke can be seen over no.2 reactor.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 07:25:59 AM EST
Reuters - Kyodo is reporting that the nuclear safety agency is saying smoke can no longer be seen coming out of the no.3 reactor.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 07:26:26 AM EST
but probably to be bought up to date soon

Status of the Nuclear Reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant - Interactive Feature - NYTimes.com

None of the six reactors at the plant have operated since the earthquake. But explosions have damaged four of the buildings, and fuel in the reactors and spent fuel stored in the buildings is in danger of melting and releasing radioactive materials. Last updated March 20, 5:40 PM ET.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 09:36:10 AM EST
Before and after photo

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 09:37:48 AM EST
The US NRC says the situation in Japan (Assume Fukushima) is on the verge of stabilising.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 09:50:22 AM EST
 Japan earthquake | Page 185 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Finnish nuclear autroritory STUK has informed Japanese nuclear authotorities that according their studies conducted 20 yrs ago using sea water for cooling in nuclear plants can be only temporary solution. As sea water boils, the saline liquid will condensate and eventually create salt crystals. If crystallation happens extensively, there will not be way of cooling down the reactors. www.yle.fi


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 09:57:51 AM EST
Just what we needed to hear...

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 10:05:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
90% of town's fatalities 'due to drowning' : National : DAILY YOMIURI ONLINE (The Daily Yomiuri)

The Yomiuri Shimbun

About 90 percent of the people known to have died in Rikuzen-Takata, Iwate Prefecture--one of the worst-hit cities in the March 11 disaster--drowned in the tsunami that followed the earthquake, a forensic expert has disclosed.

Hirotaro Iwase, a professor of forensic medicine at Chiba University, conducted postmortem examinations on 126 disaster victims in the city between Sunday and Wednesday.

More than 80 percent of the 8,000 households of the Pacific coast city, which had a pre-quake population of 23,000, are believed to have been swept away by the huge tsunami. The exact number of fatalities still unknown.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 10:13:48 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
Tokyo Electric Power Company says some of the nuclear fuel at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has apparently been damaged, as higher levels of radioactive materials have been detected in the vicinity.

The utility on Monday released the results of a radiation survey carried out at the plant on Saturday.

Officials detected in the air 5 radioactive materials that are generated by nuclear fission.

The level of iodine 131 was 5.9 milibecquerels per cubic centimeter. That's about 6 times the permissible level for workers without protective masks.

The density of the other substances was also higher than usual, but within safety standards.

The utility says the radiation is likely to have come from the damaged reactors, and added that it will check radiation levels daily.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 10:18:02 AM EST
Radiation visualizations paint a different picture of Japan - O'Reilly Radar

This piece was originally posted on The Daily ACK.

Over the weekend I came across some data on levels of radiation in Japan collected by the Japanese government, and helpfully translated into English by volunteers.

The data was somewhat stuck in PDF format. However, Gemma Hobson, Pete Warden, and I transcribed, mostly by hand, some of the more helpfully formatted files into CSV format (16KB) making it acceptable for Pete's OpenHeatMap service. The map embedded below shows our first results.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 10:21:03 AM EST
NHK WORLD English

5 radioactive materials detected

Tokyo Electric Power Company says some of the nuclear fuel at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has apparently been damaged, as higher levels of radioactive materials have been detected in the vicinity.

The utility on Monday released the results of a radiation survey carried out at the plant on Saturday.

Officials detected in the air 5 radioactive materials that are generated by nuclear fission.

The level of iodine 131 was 5.9 milibecquerels per cubic centimeter. That's about 6 times the permissible level for workers without protective masks.

The density of the other substances was also higher than usual, but within safety standards.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 11:21:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 186 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
After connecting the transmission line on Sunday, engineers found on Monday that they still did not have enough power to fully run the systems that control the temperature and pressure in the building that houses the reactor" www.nytimes.com


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 11:49:33 AM EST
Japan earthquake | Page 186 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Serious allegations against TEPCO - Die Welt translate.google.com


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 11:51:20 AM EST
Stricken Japan nuke plant skipped inspections - World news - Asia-Pacific - msnbc.com
TOKYO -- The operator of Japan's tsunami-damaged nuclear power plant told safety regulators less than two weeks before disaster struck that it had failed to carry out some scheduled inspections at the facility.

In a report submitted to Japan's nuclear safety agency on February 28, Japan's largest power utility, Tokyo Electric Power Co, said it had failed to inspect 33 pieces of equipment in the six reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex.

The equipment missed in scheduled inspections included a motor and a backup power generator for the No. 1 reactor, the firm said in a report available on a company Website.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 11:52:25 AM EST
According to Reuters they are trying to move a Putzmeister concrete pump on site, which can pump water in directly from 55 Metres away.  theyve been trying to get it there for a day now, but the roads are  not in a good state.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 11:57:27 AM EST
They don't have a Chinook?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 12:00:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apparently its too heavy, the pump trucks are built to the allowed gross weight capacity of road vehicles, they have to be heavy to stop a 50 metre arm full of concrete  from overbalancing them.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 01:50:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Many of the counterweights are likely to be removable. The Super Sea Stallion, CH-53E, can lift 14,500Kg of external load and can recover all aircraft used by the Navy other than the C135. The latest Chinook will handle 19,000 lbs. The smallest Putzmeister comes in at 31,944kg. A barge could get it close to shore...

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 03:22:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
WHO warns of serious food radiation in stricken Japan | Reuters
(Reuters) - The World Health Organisation said on Monday that radiation in food after an earthquake damaged a Japanese nuclear plant was more serious than previously thought, eclipsing signs of progress in a battle to avert a catastrophic meltdown in its reactors.

..."Quite clearly it's a serious situation," Peter Cordingley, Manila-based spokesman for the World Health Organisation's (WHO) regional office for the Western Pacific, told Reuters in a telephone interview.

"It's a lot more serious than anybody thought in the early days when we thought that this kind of problem can be limited to 20 to 30 kilometres ... It's safe to suppose that some contaminated produce got out of the contamination zone."

However, he said there was no evidence of contaminated food from Fukushima reaching other countries.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 01:02:08 PM EST
Reuters - Radiation fears grow in disaster-struck Japan  

Plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company, said radiation had been found in the Pacific nearby, perhaps not surprising given crews have been dousing the reactors with sea-water ever since the accident.

Radioactive iodine in the sea samples was 126.7 times the allowed limit, while caesium was 24.8 times over, Kyodo news agency said. That still posed no immediate danger, TEPCO said.

"It would have to be drunk for a whole year in order to accumulate to one millisievert," a TEPCO official said, referring to the standard radiation measurement unit. People are generally exposed to about 1 to 10 millisieverts each year from background radiation caused by substances in the air and soil.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 03:25:49 PM EST
I'm betting that many sea creatures don't subscribe to the Sievert scale. Especially in a nation of sushi.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 04:04:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why Fukushima made me stop worrying and love nuclear power | George Monbiot | Comment is free | The Guardian

You will not be surprised to hear that the events in Japan have changed my view of nuclear power. You will be surprised to hear how they have changed it. As a result of the disaster at Fukushima, I am no longer nuclear-neutral. I now support the technology.

A crappy old plant with inadequate safety features was hit by a monster earthquake and a vast tsunami. The electricity supply failed, knocking out the cooling system. The reactors began to explode and melt down. The disaster exposed a familiar legacy of poor design and corner-cutting. Yet, as far as we know, no one has yet received a lethal dose of radiation.

Some greens have wildly exaggerated the dangers of radioactive pollution. For a clearer view, look at the graphic published by xkcd.com. It shows that the average total dose from the Three Mile Island disaster for someone living within 10 miles of the plant was one 625th of the maximum yearly amount permitted for US radiation workers. This, in turn, is half of the lowest one-year dose clearly linked to an increased cancer risk, which, in its turn, is one 80th of an invariably fatal exposure. I'm not proposing complacency here. I am proposing perspective.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 05:48:17 PM EST

Some greens have wildly exaggerated the dangers of radioactive pollution.

Other greens have not.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 08:27:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Special Report: Fuel storage, safety issues vexed Japan plant

TOKYO (Reuters)- When the massive tsunami smacked into Fukushima Daiichi, the nuclear power plant was stacked high with more uranium than it was originally designed to hold and had repeatedly missed mandatory safety checks over the past decade.

The Fukushima plant that has spun into partial meltdown and spewed out plumes of radiation had become a growing depot for spent fuel in a way the American engineers who designed the reactors 50 years earlier had never envisioned, according to company documents and outside experts.

At the time of the March 11 earthquake, the reactor buildings at Fukushima held the equivalent of almost six years of the highly radioactive uranium fuel rods produced by the plant, according to a presentation by Tokyo Electric Power Co to a conference organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 08:44:52 PM EST
Kyodo - Radiation 1,600 times normal level 20 km from Fukushima nuke plant: IAEA (10:06)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 09:15:30 PM EST
at a town called Namie

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 10:15:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
IAEA -  Japanese authorities have notified the IAEA that efforts to restore power for the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant are on-going. As of 19 March at 21:46 UTC, the power centre at unit 2 had received electricity. Work to restore electricity to units 3 and 4 is continuing.

White smoke was reported seen emanating from unit 2 on 21 March at 9:22 UTC. Grayish smoke was reported seen emanating from unit 3 at 6:55 on 21 March, and this was reported to have 'died down' two hours later. All workers at units 1 through 4 evacuated after the smoke at unit 3 was seen. The IAEA is seeking further information at this time on the status of workers at the site.

Japanese authorities have also reported that water has been sprayed over the Common Spent Fuel Pool; this started on 21 March at 1:37 UTC. The IAEA is seeking further information on this development and will report further as updates are received from Japan.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 21st, 2011 at 09:19:44 PM EST
Nuclear Plant's Fuel Rods Damaged, Leaking Into Sea  Bloomberg

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said fuel rods at its Fukushima Dai-Ichi power plant have been damaged, releasing five kinds of radioactive material and contaminating seawater for the first time.

The acknowledgements from the utility indicate poisons emanating from the plant may be spreading through the air and sea, raising concern over the safety of seafood from the coast of northeastern Japan and agriculture in the region.

The decay of radioactive fuel rods, composed of uranium and plutonium, was suspected by company officials five days after the March 11 magnitude-9 earthquake and tsunami off the main island of Honshu.

The disclosures on the spread of radiation were made in a press briefing after midnight Tokyo time and in a press release this morning.

Iodine-131 was detected at 127 times normal levels from sample water taken at 2:30 p.m. yesterday, while cesium-134 levels were 25 times normal and cesium-137 was at 17 times normal, Tepco said on its website.



"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 12:16:32 AM EST
Radioactive substances found in sea water  NHK World Tuesday, March 22, 2011 05:08(JST)

Radioactive substances have been detected in sea water samples taken near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Tokyo Electric Power Company checked the amount in a bucket of water that was taken from an area 100 meters south of the plant water outlet on Monday afternoon.

It said the water contained higher levels of radioactive materials. Iodine 131 was 126.7 times higher than the legal level, cesium 134 was 24.8 higher, and cesium 137 was 16.5 times higher. Cobalt 58 was below the legal limit.

The electric company said it only conducted the test once and cannot tell the effects on marine life and sea water in the area. The company said it will carry out more tests in wider areas.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 05:08 +0900 (JST)


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 12:20:39 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
A special vehicle has been brought in to spray water on an overheated pool of spent nuclear fuel at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

The vehicle is equipped with a long arm that should allow operators to accurately direct water at the targets. Such truck is normally used to pour concrete during the construction of high-rise buildings.

The Self Defense Forces, which control the water spraying operations, say that workers laid iron sheets to reinforce the ground near the No.4 reactor building. The vehicle arrived on Tuesday morning.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 06:38:46 AM EST
NHK - Japan earthquake | Page 204 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
External power connected to all 6 Fukushima Daiichi reactors (Kyodo news)


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:24:19 AM EST
This is good news. However, the take-home point here is that it has taken Japan 11 days to connect external power to a nuclear power plant after an earthquake and tsunami.

This is not a direct reflection on the safety or not of the nuclear plant, but on the devastation of the surrounding infrastructure. A lot of things can go wrong in 11 days if that's how long you're going to be cut off from the rest of the world.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:30:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well looking at the safety reports on cooling pools, they all say if you have a crisis, its not going to be a problem as you have ten days to do something about it....

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:34:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
it has taken Japan one of Japan's leading power generation and distribution companies 11 days to connect external power to a nuclear power plant

FIFY.

I'm failing to understand why it hasn't been possible to airlift in some industrial gensets, park them offsite and upwind so they're not in danger of being irradiated, and plug them in.

Remember we were told that TEPCO couldn't use a genset because the plugs didn't fit.

Was it really easier to spend eleven days creating an extended cable run from who knows where than it was to jury-rig a work-around for the plugs?

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 08:08:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
why not change the plugs?

mystifying... surreal

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 08:21:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I asked that question on Reuters  site, but the comment just didn't make it past moderation.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 08:24:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Was it the plugs or the 50/60Hz mismatch?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 08:26:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ThatBritGuy:
it has taken Japan one of Japan's leading power generation and distribution companies 11 days to connect external power to a nuclear power plant

FIFY.

I suspect TEPCO hasn't been in charge for a week.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 08:27:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I posed the same question over a week ago. I fail to understand why they could not just hardwire around the plugs. Surely there are several 50Hz generators in Japan that are of the requisite size. This smacks of TEPCO having a plan and being unwilling to consider alternatives.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 12:24:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Whatever it was it's glaringly clear that safety was an afterthought.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 08:01:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 204 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
A small radiation spike could be observed in Ibaraki prefecture over the last two hours. Very likely due to rain.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:28:04 AM EST
However the Japanese Weather service is showing little or no rain at the time

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:46:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 204 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
NISA coming under scrutiny reports the BBC saying "no proper inspections for 10 years" from bbcworld


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:44:34 AM EST
BOJ to act if needed, shouldn't underwrite JGBs-Shirakawa | Reuters

(Reuters) - Bank of Japan Governor Masaaki Shirakawa on Tuesday reiterated that the central bank will take appropriate action when necessary with an eye on developments in the economy and financial markets.

Shirakawa declined to comment on whether the government should issue bonds to finance disaster relief, but stressed that the central bank should not directly underwrite government debt.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:59:02 AM EST
Japan earthquake | Page 204 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Japan's nuclear agency says the spent nuclear fuel pool at reactor 2 is filled with water.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 08:11:16 AM EST
Tiny amount of radioactive particles reach Iceland | Reuters

(Reuters) - Miniscule amounts of radioactive particles believed to have come from Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant have been detected as far away as Iceland, diplomatic sources said on Tuesday.

They stressed the tiny traces of iodine -- measured by a network of international monitoring stations as they spread eastwards from Japan across the Pacific, North America and to the Atlantic -- were far too low to cause any harm to humans.

The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), a Vienna-based U.N. body for monitoring possible breaches of the atom bomb test ban, has 63 stations worldwide for observing such particles, including one in the Icelandic capital Reykjavik.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 08:22:15 AM EST
TEPCO executive apologizes to evacuees over nuclear crisis | Kyodo News

A Tokyo Electric Power Co. executive apologized Tuesday to citizens who have been evacuated from Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, since the March 11 massive earthquake and tsunami triggered a crisis at a nuclear power plant located in Okuma and neighboring Futaba.

Executive Vice President Norio Tsuzumi made the apology when he visited a gymnasium in Tamura in the prefecture where the citizens including Okuma Mayor Toshitsuna Watanabe have stayed since they were ordered to leave their town due to the crisis at the power utility's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

''We are sorry to have caused you too much trouble,'' the TEPCO executive told the evacuees



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 10:07:35 AM EST
PhotoBlog - Panoramic image of the destruction in Kesennuma, Japan
Panoramic image of the destruction in Kesennuma, Japan


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 10:32:27 AM EST


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 10:41:11 AM EST
Reuters - Senior IAEA official: Continue to see radiation from Japan quake-hit nuclear site, does not know exact source

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 12:14:24 PM EST
Japan earthquake | Page 206 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Lighting has been restored at one of the control rooms at Japan's crippled nuclear plant, domestic media reported on Tuesday, bringing the operators a step closer to reviving the plant's cooling systems to stop radiation.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 12:16:26 PM EST
Japanese Nuclear Reactor Systems Drawn Like a NYC Subway Map | Mother Jones
Workers in Japan are still pouring seawater on overheating nuclear reactor rods at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in an effort to decrease the risk of further meltdowns. (Read Mother Jones' detailed and regularly updated explainer on the current situation.) Here's what they're up against, as Kate Sheppard and Josh Harkinson explained shortly after the emergency began:


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 12:42:05 PM EST
complete with cooling system diagram

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 12:42:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One thing is clear. If meltdown results in fuel in the bottom of the reactor vessel it would not be dispersed but concentrated and the suppression pool would not be the destination. Instead, it would either remain in the bottom of the reactor vessel or melt its way through and fall out the bottom. Unless the diagram is incomplete all of the assurances that re-criticality is impossible are just PR. They HAVE to keep the core below the point at which zirconium begins to decompose to prevent disaster. And some pumps for this process are INSIDE the reactor vessel. The jet pumps better not fail.

If the core goes dry only the boron might help. I wonder how much boron is in the boron storage tanks and what form it takes. My guess is boric acid. Anyone have any idea what would happen if 10Kg of fuel pellets fell to the bottom of the reactor vessel and were covered with boric acid? How about 20Kg with some pellets on top of others?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:34:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The meltdown that wasn't : Nature News

The magnitude-9.0 earthquake rocked Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station at 2:46 p.m. on 11 March, but the real emergency began an hour later. A wall of water swept across the site, washing away power lines and the fuel tanks for the emergency backup generators designed to take over if grid power failed. Inside the control room of the unit 1 reactor, the lights went out and the 1970s-vintage analogue gauges drifted to zero.

It will probably be years before anyone knows exactly what happened inside the three reactors at Fukushima Daiichi that seem to have partially melted down in the wake of the tsunami. But from press reports, public statements and interviews with experts, it is possible to work out the most likely scenario. And already it is clear that decisions made in the initial 24 hours by the handful of operators in the control room probably averted a much greater nuclear catastrophe than the one that now faces Japan.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 01:53:13 PM EST
They cite a nuclear engineer who sees the seawater flooding using fire engines for pumps as the crucial improvisation that prevented a full meltdown.

They also draw up an explosion scenario for the meltdown: a hydrogen explosion within the containment vessel (which was not nitrogen-flooded like the pressure vessel).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 03:37:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Though we shouldn't forget the Finnish report stating that seawater will cause severe damage from crystalized salt.

And then the just posted news that there is damage.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 03:52:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We knew there was going to be severe corrosion damage from seawater. What the Swedish report said was that too much saltwater will result in coating the fuel or fuel canisters with a layer of crystalised salt which will act as a thermal insulator and prevent any further cooling of the fuel elements. If that happens, a meltdown becomes more, not less likely. Also, seawater cooling is less effective the longer it is used.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 05:33:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan's Nuclear Emergency Explained | Mother Jones

TEPCO has now hooked up power lines to all six of the plant's reactors, the AP reports. But the company added that workers need to check all of the cooling systems for damage before switching the power on, a process that could take days or even weeks. TEPCO also said today that more water injections are needed to cool down reactor units 1, 2, and 3. 

In the Blue Marble today, Mojo's Joe Kloc has produced an illustration of GE's Mark 1 reactor in the mode of a NY subway map. And Kate Sheppard highlights a speech given last August by the director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency in which he said that nuclear plants "need not be far from urban areas." Oops.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 02:11:52 PM EST
Restoration work at Fukushima nuke plant faces challenges | Kyodo News

All six reactors at the crisis-hit plant were reconnected to external power as of Tuesday night. Despite the positive move, the temperature in the No. 1 reactor vessel briefly topped 400 C degrees, requiring large amounts of seawater injected into the reactor to cool it down, according to the agency.

Hidehiko Nishiyama, spokesman for the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, said high-level radiation amounting to 500 millisievert per hour was detected at the No. 2 reactor's turbine building a couple of days ago, which is preventing workers from trying to restore electricity at a control room.

The plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. also said two workers who had been installing a makeshift power source from Tuesday night were injured and taken to hospital, but they were not exposed to radiation.

Meanwhile, water-spraying operations to cool down a spent nuclear fuel pool at the No. 4 reactor continued, using trucks with a concrete squeeze pump and a 50-meter arm capable of pouring water from a higher point. Firefighters will shoot massive amounts of water at the No. 3 reactor's fuel pool in the afternoon, the agency said.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 02:52:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
To be precise:

As of 10 a.m. Wednesday, the temperature of the No. 1 reactor vessel dropped to 390 C degrees, but it was still above the maximum temperature of 302 C degrees set by its designer. To deal with the situation, the utility known as TEPCO had increased the amount of water injected into the reactor by 9 times.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 02:53:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 206 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Death toll: A total of 9,199 people were confirmed dead by Japan's National Police Agency as of 1400 GMT on Tuesday, while 13,786 were reported missing.

Number of people evacuated: A total of 263,915 people are in shelters around the country as of 1400 GMT on Tuesday after being evacuated, the National Police Agency of Japan said.

The government expanded the evacuation area around a quake-stricken nuclear plant in northeastern Japan to a 20-km (12 miles) radius from 10 km on March 12. Since then, around 177,500 residents have evacuated from the zone.

The government has also told people within 30 km of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex, some 240 km north of Tokyo, to stay indoors.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 02:21:40 PM EST
9:00 pm local time update: 9,487 confirmed dead, 15,617 registered missing, 2,755 injured. Identification of the dead is slow, 5,770 yesterday. Buildings found destroyed completely (by earthquake & tsunami): 18,324, burnt down: 149.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:22:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If you haven't reached your limit on techgasms, try HERE for a compendium of design drawings.

Such as Windscale, for those with long memories.

At the site you can enlarge.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 02:41:42 PM EST
PS. If you click through you get to the flickr set, where you can get poster size cutaways, wow.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 04:05:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BibliOdyssey: Nuclear Reactor Cutaways
The complete set of 105 reactor wall charts has now been uploaded by the University of New Mexico. The dates above relate to the issue of Nuclear Engineering International magazine in which they first appeared. The collection was assembled by Ronald Knief, a nuclear engineer from Sandia National Laboratories.

The UNM CSEL Nuclear Engineering Wall Chart collection can be viewed as thumbnail jpegs but the full sized images are only available as pdf files {I found it easiest to download them rather than paralyse the browser on ffox} The size and resolution of the images vary somewhat, but they're all at least 2000px on the long side. Wired posted a little more information about the collection late last year.


So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 05:40:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
CNN - Seawater damage to reactors worse than thought says official

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 03:49:15 PM EST
Worse, but in what direction?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 05:38:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
what are the options?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:48:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Bad, expensive+bad, and OMFG!!!!!!111!, at a guess.

Those aren't SI units, btw. (Although for reactor accidents, perhaps they should be.)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 12:05:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Worse as in higher likelihood of radioactive release?

Worse as in lower salvage value of the reactor?

Worse as in salt has crystallised and is hindering cooling?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 12:12:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC | BBC College of Journalism Blog - Media meltdown over nuclear threat

A week last Friday, in response to the Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the Science Media Centre dropped every other story and started issuing comments from experts on earthquakes and tsunamis, warning them to prepare for days of back-to-back interviews. We forewarned our public health experts that the media interest would soon turn to them and planned to line up our trauma experts and psychologists.

Then there were explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Suddenly, this was the only game in town as far as the media was concerned.  

By the following Tuesday, there was only one earthquake expert sitting alongside five nuclear scientists at our emergency briefing - and none of the 40 reporters who crammed into the SMC were interested in him. In just a few days, the main story had changed from the actual catastrophe of Japan to the imminent threat of a nuclear 'apocalypse', 'meltdown' and 'another Chernobyl'.

Most broadcasters had one or two reporters focusing on the earthquake, compared to five or six talking about the threat from the nuclear plant. The personal stories that usually have me in tears for days after a tragedy like this were comparatively rare, as journalists competed to summon the most alarming language possible to describe the nuclear 'meltdown'. Terrifying headlines talked of a deadly radiation cloud descending on Tokyo, before drifting across the oceans to menace the United States. 



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 04:15:25 PM EST
Fukushima Plant Warnings Went Unheeded - NYTimes.com
TOKYO -- Just a month before a powerful earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima Daiichi plant at the center of Japan's nuclear crisis, government regulators approved a 10-year extension for the oldest of the six reactors at the power station despite warnings about its safety.

The regulatory committee reviewing extensions pointed to stress cracks in the backup diesel-powered generators at Reactor No. 1 at the Daiichi plant, according to a summary of its deliberations that was posted on the Web site of Japan's nuclear regulatory agency after each meeting. The cracks made the engines vulnerable to corrosion from seawater and rainwater. The generators are thought to have been knocked out by the tsunami, shutting down the reactor's vital cooling system.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 04:25:27 PM EST
Chernobyl Cleanup Survivor's Message for Japan: 'Run Away as Quickly as Possible'
AOL News: What was your first reaction when you heard about Fukushima?
Manzurova: It felt like déjà vu. I felt so worried for the people of Japan and the children especially. I know the experience that awaits them.

But experts say Fukushima is not as bad as Chernobyl.
Every nuclear accident is different, and the impact cannot be truly measured for years. The government does not always tell the truth. Many will never return to their homes. Their lives will be divided into two parts: before and after Fukushima. They'll worry about their health and their children's health. The government will probably say there was not that much radiation and that it didn't harm them. And the government will probably not compensate them for all that they've lost. What they lost can't be calculated.

What message do you have for Japan?
Run away as quickly as possible. Don't wait. Save yourself and don't rely on the government because the government lies. They don't want you to know the truth because the nuclear industry is so powerful.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 05:42:23 PM EST
link for the entire video:

True Battle of Chernobyl

It doesn't matter that Chernobyl can't happen in the West, and no matter your views, this hour and a half must be a part of every discussion. To watch Gorby and Hans Blix spin this, juxtaposed against what seems to actually have happened, is simply mind-boggling.

That there are no follow-up studies is criminal. that the sarcophagus is already crumbling is a problem for all of civilization, even more so here in Yurp.

At least until more of you spend the time to see this, i'm speechless. and wondering what the counter arguments will be.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 06:31:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
othe two most telling pieces in it are the bit where theyre talking about the western nuclear powers demanding that the mortality figures be decreased by a factor of ten, and the piece where Gorbachov's talking about Nuclear weapons.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 06:41:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was also surprised by the lengths France went to deny the cloud had passed over them, at least then. I was also surprised by the doctor who began to study radiation deformities from animals eating contaminated grass being sent to prison.

I was also surprised by the courage of the engineers who tried to contain the disaster.

In light of maracatu's video (open thread tonight) of the more than 2,000 nuclear tests, not a few of them atmospheric, i wonder about what counts as normal background radiation from the pro-nuke side.

i'm wondering what poisonous gems have been hidden by the British gov on the Windscale "event."

And i really wonder about the people who can't get their heads around the lack of difference between nuclear weapons and nuclear power. It's not about technical disconnection between the two, or how safe producing power has now become, it's about the civilization's inability to deal with what's unleashed.

i know what i'm talking about. windpower has studied wind turbine loads for decades, over hundreds of thousands of turbines. we've had tens of thousands of top engineers investigating all anomalies, and incorporating that into design criteria. and we still lost an entire rotor on a 2.1 MW turbine a coupladaysago.

it seems you can't fight technological hubris with data, or logic.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:00:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Three things shocked me - I had no idea how close it came to going from what it was to "Europe uninhabitable" bad, the French government denial, and that there is a whole lot of plutonium in there.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:35:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Right, it's as if we were not ever told the actual situation.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:47:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was nine at the time so I have no idea what we were told. I just remember seeing the blown up plant on TV.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 07:54:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Im sure Ive said before, I have a friend who used to go and fish off the beach in Cardigan bay, one day he hauled in a  yellow and black Buoy, so went to the local pub to tell the locals that he had pulled up what he thought was a channel marker.

They told him that they recovered these all the time, and that theyre regularly thrown into the water outfall at Windscale/Sellafield and they just want  the card in the back posted back to them so they can tell where the currents are going.

Since then he's stuck to river fishing.

There are persistent rumours of higher than expected cancer rates in the Irish sea coastal areas, but ive never seen any proof.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 09:15:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Kyodo - A second team of radiation monitoring experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency will arrive in Japan soon, an IAEA official said Tuesday.

The second team, currently on its way to Japan, will join a first team which went there last Thursday, Graham Andrew, special assistant to IAEA director general, said at a press briefing.

One of the teams will undertake measurements in Fukushima Prefecture, where the crippled nuclear power plant is located, and the other one in Tokyo and its surrounding areas, according to Andrew

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 22nd, 2011 at 09:55:15 PM EST
this time in the steel of #4.

Fukushima Engineer Says He Covered Up Flaw at Shut Reactor No. 4


March 23 (Bloomberg) -- One of the reactors in the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant may have been relying on flawed steel to hold the radiation in its core, according to an engineer who helped build its containment vessel four decades ago.

Mitsuhiko Tanaka says he helped conceal a manufacturing defect in the $250 million steel vessel installed at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi No. 4 reactor while working for a unit of Hitachi Ltd. in 1974. The reactor, which Tanaka has called a "time bomb," was shut for maintenance when the March 11 earthquake triggered a 7-meter (23-foot) tsunami that disabled cooling systems at the plant, leading to explosions and radiation leaks.

"Who knows what would have happened if that reactor had been running?" Tanaka, who turned his back on the nuclear industry after the Chernobyl disaster, said in an interview last week. "I have no idea if it could withstand an earthquake like this. It's got a faulty reactor inside."




"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:00:38 AM EST
Japan quake could cost 25 tril. yen for economy: gov't estimate | Kyodo News
The government estimated Wednesday the economic cost from the March 11 earthquake on seven affected prefectures to be up to 25 trillion yen ($309 billion), while warning that Japanese exports and industrial output could halt their recoveries due to the disaster.

The destruction of social infrastructure, housing and corporate facilities in the areas could cost between 16 trillion yen and 25 trillion yen, according to the Cabinet Office. This could push the nation's economic growth rate lower by 0.5 percent.

The actual result may be worse as this projection ruled out any negative effect of power supply shortages spawned by the nuclear plant crisis in Fukushima Prefecture. But the office also suggested that downward pressure on the economy could be offset by reconstruction work, which normally brings about a surge in domestic demand.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:02:01 AM EST
Japanese banks eye lending up to 2 tril. yen to Tokyo Electric | Kyodo News
Japan's major banks are considering extending loans up to 2 trillion yen to Tokyo Electric Power Co. as early as by the end of March, sources close to the matter said Wednesday.

The move is aimed at helping the utility raise funds for measures to boost electricity supply following a quake-triggered accident at its nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture.

Among banks, Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corp. is expected to provide loans of about 600 billion yen, Mizuho Corporate Bank some 500 billion yen and the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ about 300 billion yen, the sources said.

In addition, Mitsubishi UFJ Trust and Banking Corp., Sumitomo Trust & Banking Co., Chuo Mitsui Trust and Banking Co. and Shinkin Central Bank are also considering extending loans as Tokyo Electric is likely to have requested loans from each of them last week, the sources said.

The utility firm had procured funds mostly through issuing corporate bonds, but it has apparently decided to ask banks for loans as conditions to issue corporate bonds have become severe following the nuclear power plant accident.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:20:13 AM EST
dvx:
Plant operator liability is exclusive and absolute, and power plant operators must provide a 'financial security amount' of ¥60 billion ($600 million). From 2010, this doubles to ¥120 billion ($1.2 billion). Beyond that, the government provides coverage, and liability is unlimited. The revision to the law also increases penalties, including fines, for nuclear companies operating plants without financial security, from the current maximum of ¥500,000 ($5040) up to ¥1 million ($10,090).


So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:59:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So why wouldn't the company just take the fine? rather than put up the 'financial security amount'?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 07:06:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Considering the security is 120 thousand times the fine, even if the fine were per day it would take over 3 centuries for the fines to add up to the financial security required.

Anyway, we have the following figures:
¥1M fine for operating without insurance
¥120bn maximum liability for plant operator
¥2tn upcoming loans to TEPCO from Japanese banks
¥25tn current estimate of disaster damage

Note that the ¥2tn are aimed at helping the utility raise funds for measures to boost electricity supply. Does this mean building another nuclear plant? Coal, maybe?


So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 07:17:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Can someone explain why this makes any sense at all?

Isn't TEPCO either bankrupt, about to be shut down, or perhaps both?

We all know that Japan is Not Greece, but how can a company which is poisoning and irradiating its country be considered a good credit risk?

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 12:08:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Written a week ago:
TEPCO will be either taken over or bailed out by the state.
Allegedly it was PM Kan that ordered TEPCO to start using saltwater for cooling on the 12th of March. This writes off the reactors, which is probably why TEPCO didn't do it of its own initiative, even after the first hydrogen explosion took place.
TEPCO probably cannot afford to pay for the liability from widespread radioactive contamination.
It would be interesting to know whether they have the 120bn yen lying around, whether they had insurance, or whether the banks so eager to lend them 2trillion yen will pitch in.
We're not at the point where a spent fuel pool becomes a dirty bomb, but that cannot be ruled out any longer. In any case, that's probably not insured by private insurers, and who knows the extent to which insurance covers the damage so far. It might be that TEPCO has a waiver of liability or an explicit state guarantee. The implicit state guarantee always exists - decommissioning and decontamination must happen it technically possible and so the state will do it as a last resort.

In addition, TEPCO is going to have two write off at least 3 reactor cores due to seawater injections. The entire DaiIchi plant may be out of operation for years. It may never reopen or be expanded to add two new reactors as currently planned.

The government's spokesman has already hinted that DaiIchi will be shut down.
In any case, this is a huge operating loss for TEPCO over and above the cleanup for the current disaster.
I have  (quick and dirty) estimated at ¥400bn per year the lost revenue from closing down DaiIchi. Given the average remaining life of the reactors the operating loss could easily exceed the 2 trillion the banks are willing to lend to TEPCO.
Either TEPCO will be bailed out with free money, or it will be split into a good firm and a bad firm with the government taking over the bad firm, or the government will take over the entirety of TEPCO.

A "Tokyo Electric Power Company" must exist as long as Tokyo exists. What needs to die is the idea that an electric utility can be run "for profit" with primary accountability to its shareholders as opposed to "in the public interest".



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:11:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Restoration under way at nuke plant, radiation fear spread to Tokyo | Kyodo News
The plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said it learned at around 4:20 p.m. that black smoke was seen rising at the No. 3 reactor building, leading to evacuation of workers from the four troubled reactors, but added about an hour later that it was receding.

...

It also turned out that the surface temperatures of the No. 1 and No. 3 reactor vessels have topped the maximum levels set by their designers, now that they can be measured due to battery-based backup power, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said.

In Tokyo, the metropolitan government said radioactive iodine exceeding the limit for infants' intake was detected in water at a purification plant, apparently due to the ongoing crisis at the power station crippled by the March 11 massive quake and tsunami.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:22:42 AM EST
From a couple of documents and a quick Google search the design temperature limit  ranges from 300°C to 320°C for a BWR

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:44:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's 302°C for this one, see upthread.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:57:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
UPDATE 2: Kan warns against eating Fukushima vegetables over radiation | Kyodo News
Prime Minister Naoto Kan warned consumers Wednesday against eating leaf vegetables such as spinach harvested in Fukushima Prefecture in the first measure involving food consumption to be taken since radioactive materials far exceeding legal limits were found in vegetables there.

...

If a person eats 100 grams of the vegetable with the largest detected amount of radioactive materials for about 10 days, it would be equal to ingesting half the amount of radiation a person typically receives from the natural environment in a year, the ministry said.

The ministry detected 82,000 becquerels of radioactive cesium, 164 times the limit under the food sanitation law, in ''kukitachina'' leaves from Motomiya on Monday, along with 15,000 becquerels of radioactive iodine, which is more than seven times the limit, it said.

That is the most confusing way of reporting radiation levels I've seen.

Are the 82,000 becquerels "per 100 grams"?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:43:37 AM EST
Fiscal woes won't fetter gov't spending after quake: minister | Kyodo News
The deteriorating public finances of Japan will not weigh down the government's spending on reconstruction from the March 11 earthquake, Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda said Tuesday, as Tokyo makes headway toward creating a huge set of extra budgets.

...

The quake, the largest recorded in Japan, and ensuing tsunami devastated the nation's northeastern area at a time when the government is struggling to restore its fiscal health, with the gross public-sector debt approaching 200 percent of gross domestic product, the worst among major developed countries.

Koichiro Gemba, minister of national policy, said the government may need to create three different supplementary budgets for fiscal 2011 to finance reconstruction work.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:47:46 AM EST
Quake sparks cigarette shortage in northeast Japan | Reuters

(Reuters) - The earthquake and tsunami that devastated northeast Japan this month have left some parts of the region without cigarettes, Japan Tobacco Inc said on Wednesday, a blow to smokers in a country where the habit is still popular.

A spokesman for the company told Reuters that some of its distribution centres in the region had been hit by the disasters, and some brands were out of stock in some regions.

Brands made by Japan Tobacco, the world's third-largest tobacco manufacturer, include Benson & Hedges, Camel and Winston.

The company could not say what impact the disasters would have on sales, the spokesman said, adding that it was unlikely to have a big effect on its sales forecasts for the year.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:48:36 AM EST
Minister Kaieda sorry for reportedly 'forcing' water-spraying mission | Kyodo News
The move came after Tokyo Gov. Shintaro Ishihara on Monday lodged a protest with Prime Minister Naoto Kan over the ''forcing'' of Tokyo Fire Department members dispatched to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant to engage in an hours-long water-spraying mission and referring to ''punishment'' if they refused the task.

According to Ishihara, Kan apologized over the matter. Ishihara said that he did not know who actually said so, but sources close to the metropolitan government said Kaieda made the remarks.

Ishihara also said that equipment broke down because of the continuous mission, which involved spraying water toward the troubled No. 3 reactor building for 13 hours at a time.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:49:52 AM EST
Bid to 'Protect Assets' Slowed Reactor Fight - WSJ.com
The plant's operator--Tokyo Electric Power Co., or Tepco--considered using seawater from the nearby coast to cool one of its six reactors at least as early as last Saturday morning, the day after the quake struck. But it didn't do so until that evening, after the prime minister ordered it following an explosion at the facility. Tepco didn't begin using seawater at other reactors until Sunday.

...

Government efforts also were plagued with delays. Japan's military, the Self-Defense Forces, didn't participate in cool-down efforts in a big way until Wednesday, after four of the six reactors had suffered damage and the remaining two showed signs of heating as well. A military spokesman said forces didn't move in because they weren't requested by Tepco. A Tepco spokesman declined to comment on the issue specifically, saying in general the company is in contact with the government.

...

Authorities apparently were unaware that water had stopped going into the cooling system of the No. 2 reactor. They began using seawater Monday evening, but the loss of its cooling system led to an explosion early Tuesday.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 07:26:52 AM EST
How much is the plant worth?

Tokyo Electric Power Company - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Power stations and generation capacity
  • Hydro: 160 / 9 GW
  • Thermal (oil, coal, LN(P)G, geothermal): 26 / 37 GW
  • Nuclear: 3 / 17 GW
  • Wind: 1 / 1 MW
  • Total: 190 / 63 GW

Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The plant consists of six boiling water reactors. These light water reactors[2] drive electrical generators with a combined power of 4.7 GWe
4.7 GW would be between 1/3 and 1/4 of TEPCO's nuclear capacity, and between 1/13 and 1/14 of its total capacity.

Assuming proportionality with Revenue: ¥5308.0 billion (consolidated), the loss of Fukushima I could mean ¥400bn of lost revenue (annually?) for TEPCO.

That's over 3 times the ¥120bn maximum liability for the accident itself.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 07:34:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English

Radiation could affect people outside 30km zone

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano says computer forecasts show that radiation leaking from a nuclear plant could pose a hazard to people outside its 30-kilometer zone.

Edano said at a news conference on Wednesday that a computer forecast system has shown that radiation levels in some areas outside the 30-kilometer zone would exceed 100 millisieverts, which is the level that could affect the human thyroid if a person is exposed to it outdoors for 24 hours.

Edano cited a lack of data and the need for more precise calculations, and said there is no need for immediate evacuation or to seek shelter indoors.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 08:49:21 AM EST
NHK WORLD English

Extremely high radiation found in soil

Japanese authorities have detected a concentration of a radioactive substance 1,600 times higher than normal in soil at a village, 40 kilometers away from the troubled nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture.

The disaster task force in Fukushima composed of the central and local governments surveyed radioactive substances in soil about 5 centimeters below the surface at 6 locations around the plant from last Friday through Tuesday.

The results announced on Wednesday show that 163,000 becquerels of radioactive cesium-137 per kilogram of soil has been detected in Iitate Village, about 40 kilometers northwest of the plant.

For scale, the limits for c-137 in meat are 600-1,000 Bq/kg.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 08:55:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I heard an estimate of that Fukushima is spewing 5% of what Chernobyl did.
by das monde on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 08:56:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English

High-level radiation in Fukushima water

High-levels of radiation have been detected in tap water at municipalities across Fukushima Prefecture, where the troubled Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located.

Water sampled in Iitate village on Sunday contained 965 becquerels of radioactive iodine-131 per liter, more than 3 times the government safety limit of 300 becquerels per liter.

Water sampled in Tamura city last Thursday contained 348 becquerels of iodine, but the level was down to 161 becquerels 2 days later.

Water from 4 other cities in the prefecture had iodine levels above the 100-becquerel per liter safety limit for infants as of Monday.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:05:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Neutron beam observed 13 times at crippled Fukushima nuke plant | Kyodo News

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Wednesday it has observed a neutron beam, a kind of radioactive ray, 13 times on the premises of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after it was crippled by the massive March 11 quake-tsunami disaster.

TEPCO, the operator of the nuclear plant, said the neutron beam measured about 1.5 kilometers southwest of the plant's No. 1 and 2 reactors over three days from March 13 and is equivalent to 0.01 to 0.02 microsieverts per hour and that this is not a dangerous level.

The utility firm said it will measure uranium and plutonium, which could emit a neutron beam, as well.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:10:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Say what!?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:24:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ditto

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:31:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Perhaps the reactor vessels are turning into pulsars or quasars?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:48:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Neutron beam observed 13 times at crippled Fukushima nuke plant | Kyodo News
In the 1999 criticality accident at a nuclear fuel processing plant run by JCO Co. in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture, uranium broke apart continually in nuclear fission, causing a massive amount of neutron beams.

In the latest case at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, such a criticality accident has yet to happen.

But the measured neutron beam may be evidence that uranium and plutonium leaked from the plant's nuclear reactors and spent nuclear fuels have discharged a small amount of neutron beams through nuclear fission.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:31:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Id want  timings as to when that occurred

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:33:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'd like a better description of what was actually measured and how.

Plus "a neutron beam" is not "a radioactive beam".

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:44:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
To paraphrase the automated USGS eartquake reports: this news item doesn't appear to have been reviewed by a nuclear physicist :P

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:37:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's likely the translator's fault.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:13:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That is not an apt comparison as meat is ingested.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:22:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, it's what plants take up from it what can be ingested.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:11:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, but what fraction of what's in the soil is taken by plants?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:12:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, enough for spinach to be withdrawn from markets.

Groundwater is also interesting.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:17:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, 3 times "normal", as opposed to 1600 times "normal" in the soil.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:18:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
3 times the safety limit, not "normal".

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:26:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Plants also absorb, through their leaves, particles falling on them as dust or especially in rainfall. So leafy vegetables - the leaves of which we eat - are particularly sensitive from the human health point of view, which is why spinach has been withdrawn.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:49:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But the withdrawal of the spinach is not a consequence of the topsoil contamination. Both are consequences of falling radioactive dust.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:56:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
With rainfall, I should think. The news item up there speaks of 5cm below the surface. (Did they choose that depth, did they also analyse surface dust, I don't know). But one would expect particles to have been washed below the surface by rain. Plants would be absorbing by roots and leaves.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:12:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
theres a piece in the Chernobyl documentary that talks about the Caesium sinking 5cm a year down through the soil.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:35:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wait, so after 30 years it's not only decayed by half but also sunk under 1.5m of soil?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:40:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't know the particular chemistry of caesium, but there's a general tendency for molecules to leach down gradually with rainwater. The more permeable the soil type, the quicker it happens.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:45:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The activity of Caesium-137 is 440 TBq/mole. So 186kBq/kg of Cs-137 in topsoil is 4.227 10-10moles of Cs-137 in a Kg of topsoil.

Let's see, a banana contains about 0.01 moles of potassium and t

So, if you replaced all the potassium in a banana with radioactive caesium you would have 4TBq. The limit you quote for meat, by weight, would be about 100Bq for a banana. So a "safe" banana can have no more than 2.5e-11 moles of Cs-137 per mole of potassium.

If you grow vegetables in topsoil contaminated with Caesium-137, at what rate does the Caesium replace the Potassium?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:54:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2603856/pdf/yjbm00642-0078.pdf

To the extent that rubidium or cesium are capable of substituting for
potassium in biochemical and biophysical processes one would expect that
these ions would be at least a temporary nutritional substitute for potassium.
Thus, it has been shown that rubidium and, to a lesser extent, cesium
can replace potassium as an essential nutrient for the growth of bacteria,"1'53
yeast," sea urchin eggs,' and rats." ' Young rats immediately cease growing
on a potassium-free but otherwise adequate diet and usually die within
a few weeks. The addition of rubidium to the diet will permit almost normal
growth to occur for one or two weeks before the animals sicken again and
die. To a more limited degree cesium is also capable of substituting for
potassium in this way." ' Characteristic lesions develop in the kidneys and
in the skeletal and cardiac muscles of potassium-depleted animals." The
addition of rubidium or cesium to the diet will prevent these changes' and
if they have already developed, the feeding of these elements will rapidly
effect a cure.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 11:05:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ceebs:
To the extent that rubidium or cesium are capable of substituting for
potassium in biochemical and biophysical processes one would expect that
these ions would be at least a temporary nutritional substitute for potassium.
Yes, but what is the extent of biochemical substitution?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 11:06:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wish I had full access to Academic journals,

Transfer of radioactive caesium from soil to veget... [Environ Pollut. 1989] - PubMed result From here, and just from the abstract it appears that the uptake depends on the potassium levels in the soil, In uplands grass it appears that The relative uptake depends on the dryness of the soil, the dryer, the better the relative uptake of potassium, (Which doesn't sound good for a country with a rice diet)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 11:28:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tangentially - how much would it cost to get ET access to JSTOR? is there a free community option? (He wrote, optimistically.)
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 12:01:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
JSTOR: Options for Access to JSTOR
    Options for Access to JSTOR

    JSTOR is available at more than 6,000 participating institutions.

    If you are affiliated with a participating institution and are unable to access content in JSTOR:

    • You may need to login at your library first. Check the list of participating institutions for a login link, visit your library's web site, or contact your library for assistance.
    • Your institution may not license the specific collection that contains the article. Check with your library for help locating this article through another source.

    If you are not affiliated with a participating institution:



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 12:13:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ive not heard of one, although my knowledge is a couple of years out of date. We were talking about a new login system which would have allowed access in any university facilities anywhere in the country when i was last involved, but how far that has got, I don't know. Probably the easiest way is to sign up for an Open University course and get access through their library (I know theyre a subscriber but processes for getting access through them isnt something I know about)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 12:25:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You may be thinking of eduroam. We have it, and it lets you get online from any participating institution using your home institution's login. Hopefully you can then access your own institution's library, but I doubt it will let you do any more than that.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:19:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
there were talks of allowing more than that, but as I said my knowledge of where that was heading is (Thinking about it) Three years out of date

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:34:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There's an yearly access fee to JSTOR itself and then each collection has an yearly access fee.

At a quick glance we're talking around $10,000/yr.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:14:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I find this: Chernobyl: country by country A - H

Clooth, G. and Aumann, D.C. (1990). Environmental transfer parameters and radiological impact of the Chernobyl fallout in and around Bonn. J. Environ. Radioactivity. 12(2). pg. 97-120.

  • Bonn escaped significant Chernobyl fallout. 137Cs to 1,383 Bq/m2 (highest of six locations).
  • Geometric mean for soil-to-plant concentration factor for 137Cs into pasture = 4.2 x 10-2 (concentration of radionuclides in plant, wet weight, divided by concentration of radionuclides in soil, dry weight.)


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 05:27:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Same source, on transfer into meat rather than plant:

Chernobyl: country by country S-Z

Rosen, K., Andersson, I. and Lonsjo, H. (1995). Transfer of radiocesium from soil to vegetation and to grazing lambs in a mountain area in northern Sweden. J. Environ. Radioactivity. 26. pg. 237-257.
  • "Activity analyses of soil samples,... showed a mean deposition of 137Cs of 15.7 (range 14.1-17.6) kBq/m2." (pg. 237).
  • 137Cs concentration of the herbage cut at the various sites decreased with time from 1,175 to 900 Bq/kg dry weight." (pg. 237).
  • "The average 137Cs concentration in the abdomen wall muscle of lamb carcasses was 1,087, 668, 513 and 597 Bq/kg wet weight in the years 1990-1993 respectively..." (pg. 237).


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 05:29:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
DoDo:
163,000 becquerels of radioactive cesium-137 per kilogram of soil has been detected in Iitate Village, about 40 kilometers northwest of the plant
Rad Pro Calculator: Free Online Gamma Activity, Dose Rate and Shielding Calculator
0.163 MBq of Cs-137 at 1 Meters = 0.0124 μSv/h


So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:28:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You calculated the radiation exposure of someone standing 1 m away from a clump of 1 kg of topsoil with air in-between. IMHO that's a less meaningful comparison than meat.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:25:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Uh, you eat soil?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:28:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English

TEPCO: Black smoke rises from No.3 reactor

The Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, says black smoke was seen rising from the No.3 reactor building at the quake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant at around 4:20 PM on Wednesday.

TEPCO told reporters that it received a report 1 hour later that the smoke had gradually cleared.

The company said that the level of radiation near the main gate of the plant, 1 kilometer west of the No.3 reactor, was 265.1-microsieverts-per-hour at 5 PM. They added there had been no major change in the levels after the smoke was observed.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:06:17 AM EST


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:10:26 AM EST
lots of worry that the white rods all over the site are fuel rods

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:11:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
although if they were it would make the site unworkable

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:21:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Lots of worries by whom? The sidewalls of the top portion of No. 1, No. 3 and No. 4 were white, and they were blown away, so there is a more obvious explanation than fuel rods...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:23:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A variety of people on reuters site, and in a couple of other online communities where ive seen that video posted

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:28:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Resentment among S. Koreans toward Japan softens after quake: poll | Kyodo News

The lingering resentment among many South Koreans against former colonial ruler Japan has softened significantly since a powerful earthquake and tsunami devastated northeastern Japan and triggered a nuclear crisis this month, according to a newspaper poll released Wednesday.

The Maeil Business Newspaper said 27.1 percent of respondents to a post-quake poll said bad feelings toward Japan have ''vanished considerably'' while 45.6 percent said South Korea should provide more disaster-relief assistance to Japan.

The poll result is in sharp contrast to previous opinion surveys that had constantly shown that Japan, which ruled the Korea Peninsula between 1910 and 1945, is one of the most hated countries in the world.

Maeil said feelings of sympathy toward Japan were particularly conspicuous among elderly Koreans.

Also, 64.2 percent of the respondents in the poll, conducted Friday through Sunday, said South Koreans should learn from the ''public discipline and law-abiding spirit'' the Japanese have shown after the triple disaster.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:11:05 AM EST
23.6-meter-high tsunami triggered by March 11 quake: survey | Kyodo News

A tsunami wave that hit a coastal city in Iwate Prefecture after the March 11 massive earthquake is estimated to have reached 23.6 meters in height, a government-commissioned field survey by the Port and Airport Research Institute showed Wednesday.

The tsunami wave measured in the city of Ofunato was lower than the domestic record of 38.2 meters marked in the 1896 Meiji Sanriku Earthquake Tsunami, and 34.9 meters logged in the wake of the 2004 earthquake off the Indonesian coast of Sumatra.

However, Kazuhiko Toda, a researcher at the institute, said the height of the March 11 tsunami was marked under the condition where breakwaters and other counter-tsunami facilities have been set up, so it may have been greater in power than the one in 1896.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:41:16 AM EST
Radioactive iodine exceeding limit for infants found in Tokyo water | Kyodo News

The Tokyo metropolitan government warned Wednesday that infants should not drink tap water in Tokyo's 23 wards and five of its suburban cities as radioactive iodine exceeding the limit for them was detected in water at a purification plant.

The amount of the substance was 210 becquerels per 1 kilogram of water at the plant in the Kanamachi district of Katsushika Ward, which serves the cities of Musashino, Mitaka, Machida, Tama and Inagi as well as central Tokyo, above the limit of 100 becquerels for infants but below 300 becquerels for older people, the metropolitan government said.

The detection came amid the country's worst nuclear crisis that has led to radiation leaks at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, located about 220 kilometers northeast of Tokyo, triggered by the devastating earthquake and tsunami earlier this month.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:51:23 AM EST
Radioactive Tokyo tapwater HARMS BABIES ... if drunk for a year * The Register

The Japanese government has announced that radioactive iodine from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear powerplant has been found in tapwater, and that infants should not drink it. However there is little reason for concern once the facts are understood.

Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare says that tests have revealed levels of the radioactive isotope iodine-131 in tapwater samples in Tokyo that range from 100 to 210 becquerels/litre. The radio-iodine health limit in force for iodine-131 is 300 Becquerels/litre, but there is a separate limit for baby milk fed to infants less than a year old of 100 Bq/l - hence the recommendation.

As ever, we hear of "more than twice the safe level", though the BBC does add that "officials have stressed that children would have to drink a lot of it before it harmed them".



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 05:51:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Gov't to support children orphaned by quake, tsunami | Kyodo News
The welfare ministry decided Wednesday to find out how many children lost their parents in the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan and to support them by dispatching caseworkers to the afflicted areas, ministry officials said.

While it is estimated that more than 100 children became orphans as a result of the 1995 Great Hanshin Earthquake, ''the latest disaster has caused wide-scale damage and we are concerned that a greater number of children have lost their parents,'' a Health, Welfare and Labor Ministry official said.

Municipal governments on the coast severely damaged by the quake-triggered tsunami have lost the ability to function properly and are incapable at present of checking the situation regarding orphaned minors, according to the ministry.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 11:20:07 AM EST
AFP: Canada asked to host quake orphans in summer camps (5 days ago)
At a forum on international relations, the ambassador described the "human dimension" of the devastation back home, and suggested how Canada might help Japan recover.

The quake struck around 3 p.m. local time when children were in school, he explained. Most schools in Japan were built to withstand seismic events and so many students escaped the harm that befell their parents.

"We'll have to care for these children over the long term," Ishikawa said. He dismissed adoption as an option, but said the children would surely enjoy vacationing in the Canadian wilds.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 11:21:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 234 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Here| are some of the latest facts and figures from today's U.N. update on the situation in Japan's quake and tsunami-hit areas:

- More than 24,000 people are feared dead or missing: 9,408 deaths have been confirmed so far, and 14,716 people remain missing

- The government has yet to release an estimate of the total number of people affected by the disaster

- The number of people in evacuation centres in and outside the affected areas has dropped to 261,000, nearly 57,000 less than on Tuesday. The total includes 83,778 people evacuated from the 20km zone around the Fukushima nuclear power plant

- Growing numbers of people are relocating to unaffected prefectures. Nearly 30,000 evacuees have already moved to 437 municipalities in 43 prefectures

- The governor of Miyagi estimates it will take six months to a year for all the displaced to be accommodated in temporary homes


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 11:38:13 AM EST
One I missed last night

Reuters - Japan earthquake | Page 236 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com

At the No. 2 reactor, workers have been unable to replace a pump to help revive its internal cooling system since Friday as high-level radiation amounting to at least 500 millisieverts per hour was detected at its turbine building, the spokesman said.

(note this quote has a milli micro mix up according to later comments)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 01:37:43 PM EST
(note this quote has a milli micro mix up according to later comments)

We can hope! But would 500 micro-sieverts be nearly high enough to prevent workers from accessing the area?


"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 02:04:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
had a look through and the quote comes from here

Japan Stocks Fall for First Time in Three Days on Reactor, Water Concerns - Bloomberg

A radiation level of 500 millisieverts per hour "days ago" at the No. 2 reactor turbine at the damaged Fukushima Dai- Ichi nuclear plant forced workers to suspend repairs and they have yet to restart, Hidehiko Nishiyama, a spokesman for the Japan Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, told reporters today. Exposure for 30 minutes at that dosage, the highest reported so far, would reach the maximum lifetime cumulative radiation limit permitted by Japan's health ministry.

So no milli/micro confusion.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 03:43:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is looking grim. #2 is the reactor that had an explosion that damaged the torus. That would compromise the basic pressure-temperature design of the whole reactor and make cooling more difficult. If there are 500 millisievert levels inside the turbine building or the reactor building no one can work there and a hydrogen explosion could release vastly more radioactive material than we have seen heretofore.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 04:08:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tepco puts focus on reactivating cooling pumps at reactors 3, 4 | The Japan Times Online

NISA also said it discovered that on March 18, an unusually high amount of radiation was found emanating from a building housing turbines located near reactor No. 2. Although the NISA said the radiation amount was approximately 500 millisieverts per hour, Tepco later denied that such a high level was detected, citing a miscommunication between the plant operator and the NISA.

The NISA said that while they were still unsure of the radiation's source, two workers who were in the building replacing motors for pressure pumps were exposed and further work at that location has been stalled.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:21:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan atom plant worker received high radiation: IAEA | Reuters

(Reuters) - One of the workers struggling to avert a disaster at Japan's crippled nuclear plant was exposed to a high radiation dose that may increase the risk of cancer, a U.N. atomic agency official said Wednesday.

Japanese authorities have also told the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) two prefectures near the crippled plant -- Chiba and Ibaraki -- were advised to monitor seafood products, the official, Graham Andrew, said.

High levels of radioactive iodine and cesium were measured close to water discharge points at the Fukushima power plant, "before dilution by the ocean," he told a news conference.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 03:36:15 PM EST
TEPCO : Press Release | Plant Status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (as of 9:00 PM Mar 23rd)
-We detected iodine, cesium and tellurium in the air collected at the site of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on March 20th, 21st and 22nd.

Tellurium is underlined as a new thing that has shown up, now it doesnt vapourise till around 850 centigrade, so it could be that that isn't good news.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 03:57:41 PM EST
See also Detection of radioactive materials from the seawater around the discharge canal of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (23 March, 2011)
We will continue to conduct same kind of sampling survey.

attachment1:The result of seawater nuclide analysis
             (Northern discharge canal of 2F ) (PDF 7.64KB)
attachment2:The result of seawater nuclide analysis(2F Iwasawa Coast)
            (PDF 7.74KB)
attachment3:Seawater concentration of radioactive materials(PDF 15.2KB)

and The results of nuclide analyses of radioactive materials in the air at the site of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station
We will continue the sampling survey same as this one.

attachment1:The result of the nuclide analysis of radioactive materials in
            the air at the site of Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station
            (PDF 12.4KB)
attachment2:<Reference>The result of the nuclide analysis of radioactive
            materials in the air at the site of Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power
            Station(PDF 13.2KB)



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 06:20:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
An NHK helicopter crew has confirmed what appears to be steam rising from No. 1, 2, 3 and 4 reactor buildings at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

This is the first time that steam has been seen coming out of the No.1 reactor.

The helicopter crew was filming from a location more than 30 kilometers from the plant shortly before 7:00 AM on Thursday.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 08:57:37 PM EST
China Did Not Turn Away Japanese Plane: Official

A northeast China port did not turn away a Japanese cargo plane over radiation concerns and the aircraft left on its own, provincial authorities said Wednesday.

Earlier media reports said a Japanese cargo plane of All Nippon Airways arrived at Dalian, a port city in northeast China's Liaoning Province, on March 16 from an airport near Tokyo. But it was denied entry due to excessive radiation detected from its cargo.

A spokesman with Liaoning Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau said the plane insisted to leave because of a tight schedule while the customs were carrying out standard procedures involving radioactive goods.

Dalian Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau reported to higher authorities after detecting excessive radiation from the container. The bureau was waiting for further notice when the plane took flight, the spokesman said.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 09:43:52 PM EST
daily yomuri - Iodine-131 at 120 becquerels (over the infant-safe limit of 100) has been detected in the water of Kawaguchi, Saitama Prefecture.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:47:29 PM EST
Bottled water for infants (3 day supply, 6 litres) available from Tokyo ward offices. Check local office for distribution points.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 23rd, 2011 at 10:49:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
New Problems at Japanese Plant Subdue Optimism  NYT

Nuclear engineers have become increasingly concerned about a separate problem that may be putting pressure on the Japanese technicians to work faster: salt buildup inside the reactors, which could cause them to heat up more and, in the worst case, cause the uranium to melt, releasing a range of radioactive material.

Richard T. Lahey Jr., who was General Electric's chief of safety research for boiling-water reactors when the company installed them at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, said that as seawater was pumped into the reactors and boiled away, it left more and more salt behind.

He estimates that 57,000 pounds of salt have accumulated in Reactor No. 1 and 99,000 pounds apiece in Reactors No. 2 and 3, which are larger. The big question is how much of that salt is still mixed with water and how much now forms a crust on the uranium fuel rods.

Crusts insulate the rods from the water and allow them to heat up. If the crusts are thick enough, they can block water from circulating between the fuel rods. As the rods heat up, their zirconium cladding can rupture, which releases gaseous radioactive iodine inside and may even cause the uranium to melt and release much more radioactive material.

So they need to get fresh water and get the pumps working. How hard can that be?

A Japanese nuclear safety regulator said on Wednesday that plans were under way to fix a piece of equipment that would allow freshwater instead of seawater to be pumped in.

That would be good. Hopefully, TEPCO's plan won't take another week to implement. Meanwhile they have to get the emergency cooling pumps working.

The emergency cooling system pump and motor for a boiling-water reactor are roughly the size and height of a compact hatchback car standing on its back bumper. The powerful system has the capacity to propel thousands of gallons of water a minute throughout a reactor pressure vessel and storage pool. But that very power can also be the system's Achilles' heel.

The pump and piping are designed to be kept full of water. But they tend to leak and develop alternating pockets of air and water, Mr. Friedlander said. If the pump is turned on without venting the air and draining the water, the water from the pump would hit the alternating pockets with enough force to blow holes in the piping. Venting the air and draining the water requires a technician to reach a dozen valves, sometimes using a ladder. The water is removed through a hose to the nearest drain, usually in the floor, that leads to machinery designed to remove radiation from the water.

The process takes a full 12 hours in a reactor that is operating normally, Mr. Friedlander said. But even then, the water in the pipes tends to be radioactively contaminated because the valves that separate it from the reactor are not entirely tight.

Backlash from the reactor is likely to be an even bigger problem when the water inside the reactor is much more radioactive than usual and is under extremely high pressure.


So, everything is under control?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 12:15:55 AM EST
So they need to get fresh water and get the pumps working. How hard can that be?

I was reading last night that to keep temperatures down,  they've had to increase the water flow through one of the reactors from 2 cubic metres an hour to 18 per minute assuming theyre all being dealt with the same way, thats somewhere between 30 and 100 cubic metres of diemineralised water you need to find every minute, now there is a plant on site to produce this stuff, but we don't  know how that has been damaged by the Tsunami. Other than that it's rather a lot to find.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 06:30:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
replace hours in here with minutes :)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 06:32:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
at 3g salt per cubic metre  of water turned to steam thats erm,,,, 38,360.000 metres cubed through the first three reactors. 12,780,000 each reactor,  thats roughly 1000cubic metres of water per minute hes working on being evaporated, about 200 times what we worked out the heat output would be. theres something screwy about either our earlier calculations or his figures. in this article.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 06:47:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Site operators should have a rough estimate of the proportion of water that is evaporated vs. what exits as water and how that has changed over time. That will directly affect the amount of salt deposited.

TEPCO's "plans to fix a piece of equipment that would allow freshwater to flow" likely involve the de-mineralizer, which is probably common to all four reactors. With 50 workers at a time they likely are attacking these problems serially. That approach could have catastrophic consequences, starting with unit #2.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:44:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
asahi.com(朝日新聞社):Some equipment in stricken plant receiving outside electricity - English

Electrical connections from an outside source have been made to all six reactors at the Fukushima No. 1 plant.

Work is continuing to prepare for transmitting electricity to equipment at the No. 1 to No. 4 reactors.

However, work at the No. 2 reactor is stymied by water-soaked equipment and high radiation levels in the building housing the turbines.

Although an aftershock with an intensity of upper 5 on the Japanese scale of 7 was recorded in Iwaki, Fukushima Prefecture, south of the nuclear plant on Wednesday morning, it did not affect the reactors.

TEPCO officials also said the temperature in the core of the No. 1 reactor had risen to about 400 degrees, above the design limit of 302 degrees. The amount of seawater supplied to the core was increased early Wednesday from 2 cubic meters an hour to 18 cubic meters an hour.

The Self-Defense Forces were also planning to conduct surveillance of the No. 1 reactor from Wednesday afternoon by using a vehicle designed to protect against chemical exposure.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 06:09:48 AM EST
Japan earthquake | Page 262 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
A statement from the ISRN (Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety) at 8 am this morning in Paris (France) on the reactor 3: "IRSN analyzes the potential causes of loss of containment of reactor No. 3. One hypothesis
discussed by IRSN is the possibility of a rupture of the reactor vessel followed by an interaction between the corium (a mixture of fuel and molten metal) and concrete at the bottom of containment. " www.irsn.fr/FR/Actualites_presse/Actualites/Documents/IRSN_Seisme-Japon_Point-situation-24032011-08h .pdf


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 07:04:38 AM EST
See also Corium (nuclear reactor) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Corium, also called fuel containing material (FCM) or lava-like fuel containing material (LFCM), is a lava-like molten mixture of portions of nuclear reactor core, formed during a nuclear meltdown, the most severe class of a nuclear reactor accident. It consists of nuclear fuel, control rods, structural materials from the affected parts of the reactor, products of their chemical reaction with air, water and steam, and, in case the reactor vessel is breached, molten concrete from the floor of the reactor room.


So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 07:07:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
All headlines | Kyodo News
NEWS ADVISORY: 17 workers so far exposed to radiation over 100 millisieverts: TEPCO


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 07:32:26 AM EST
3 workers exposed to high radiation, 2 sustain possible burns | Kyodo News

Three workers were exposed to high-level radiation Thursday while laying cable at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, and two of them were taken to hospital due to possible radiation burns to their feet, the nuclear safety agency and the plant operator said.

The three men in their 20s and 30s were exposed to radiation amounting to 173 to 180 millisieverts at around 12:10 p.m. while laying cable underground at the No. 3 reactor's turbine building.

The two hospitalized are workers of plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s affiliated firm and had their feet under water while carrying out the work from 10 a.m., according to the utility known as TEPCO and the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.

The two, who were diagnosed with possible beta ray burns at a Fukushima hospital, will later be sent to the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba Prefecture, the agency said.

TEPCO said radioactive water may have seeped through the workers' radiation protective gear, causing radioactive materials in the water to stick to their skin. The burns are caused by direct exposure to beta rays, the utility added.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 07:33:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano says workers at the Fukushima nuclear power plant should take extra precautions to prevent exposing themselves accidentally to high levels of radiation.

Edano said it is extremely regrettable that 2 workers at the plant were hospitalized on Thursday after they inadvertently stepped onto a floor flooded with highly radioactive water.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 07:48:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Kyushu Electric defers booting up 2 nuclear reactors | Kyodo News
Kyushu Electric Power Co. said Thursday it has decided to delay rebooting two nuclear reactors at its Genkai nuclear power plant in Saga Prefecture that it had suspended for servicing in view of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Toshio Manabe, the regional utility's president, told a news conference his company has decided to postpone rebooting the No. 2 and No. 3 reactors from their originally scheduled times of late March and early April.

...

Manabe said the situation at the Fukushima plant is not heading toward stability and that a string of accidents there since the massive March 11 earthquake that hit the region have prompted the government to start reviewing steps to ensure safety at nuclear power plants.

(my emphasis)

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 07:59:37 AM EST
Thats not a good thing to read.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:13:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
People may be urged to move further from nuclear plant for convenience | Kyodo News
The government is reviewing whether to continue its current directive for people living 20 to 30 kilometers away from a troubled nuclear plant in Fukushima Prefecture to remain indoors, with an eye on possibly recommending they relocate further away to make their everyday life easier over the long term, the top government spokesman indicated Thursday.

...

Edano emphasized that a revised order of the kind must be dealt with cautiously so as not to create a misperception that danger from the radiation leaks is spreading.

Opposition lawmakers have been pressing the government and ruling party during their meeting Thursday to address the concerns of residents who are being isolated in the 30-km range and called for their evacuation in the same manner as those within the 20-km range.

(my emphasis)

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:01:20 AM EST
OPINION: Japan's Coming Nuclear Reassessment | Kyodo News
Nonetheless, Japan will draw important, expensive, and likely painful lessons from this accident in the coming months. The precarious balance of power in nuclear decision making between central government bureaucrats, utility companies, and local politicians will not make it easy for Japan to translate what it learns into actions.

Any future decisions to extend the lifetimes of Japan's nuclear power plants after 40 years of licensed operation should take into account the forthcoming technical evaluation of the Fukushima accident.

Japan should candidly review the willingness of Japanese authorities, not long before this month's accident, to permit the oldest reactor at Fukushima to operate for an additional 10 years after its 40-year license expired this year.

...

(Mark Hibbs is a senior associate in Carnegie's Nuclear Policy Program, based in Berlin. Before joining Carnegie, he was an editor and correspondent for nuclear energy publications for over 20 years.)



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:03:24 AM EST

The Tokyo metropolitan government the same day began distributing 240,000 plastic bottles of drinking water for infants under the age of 12 months in the wake of the discovery March 22 that water at a water purification plant for tap water in Tokyo contained radioactive iodine at levels higher than allowed for infants.

(Kyodo News)

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:13:48 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
The Tokyo Metropolitan Government says it has lifted its advice against using tap water for consumption by infants in Tokyo's 23 wards and 5 adjacent cities.

The government said the level of radioactive iodine-131 in water at the Kanamachi purification plant on Thursday morning had dropped to 79 becquerels per liter -- below the recommended limit of 100 for infants under 1 year old. The government added that the level has been falling for 3 days.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:22:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If pictures that accompanied earlier articles about Iodine-123 contamination were of the water treatment plant, the plant is open to the air and therefore vulnerable to rain and other fallout, so the spike is likely related to wind direction and rain.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:52:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Iodine 131, that is.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:53:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
Japan's science ministry says levels of radioactive substances up to twice recommended limits were detected in waters 30 kilometers off the quake-damaged Fukushima nuclear plant.

The ministry conducted a survey on Wednesday in 8 locations over a distance of 70 kilometers from north to south in the Pacific Ocean. Radioactive iodine-131 and radioactive cesium-137 were detected at all locations.

Levels of radioactive iodine-131 were from 1.05 to 1.92 times higher than the limit. Readings for radioactive cesium-137 were all below the limit, but about 10,000 times higher than a similar survey last year.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:17:30 AM EST
NHK WORLD English

Radioactive water detected in 6 prefectures

Radioactive water has been detected at water purification facilities in Tokyo and 5 other prefectures. The level of radioactive iodine-131 at 18 purification plants exceeds Japan's safety limit for infants.

Radioactive iodine-131 does not exist in nature. Experts believe it was carried by the wind from the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant to surrounding areas, and then washed down into rivers by rain.

The governments of Tokyo, Fukushima, Ibaraki, Chiba, Saitama and Tochigi prefectures have detected more than 100 becquerels of iodine per liter of water, above the safety level for infants under 12 months. But the water is safe for adults because it's not above the 300 becquerel safety limit for them.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 04:07:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
All headlines | Kyodo News

NEWS ADVISORY: Radiation 10,000 times normal level in water where nuke plant All headlines



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 05:24:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nuclear Waste Needs to Be Stored. But Where? - NYTimes.com
WASHINGTON -- The threat of the release of highly radioactive spent fuel at a Japanese nuclear plant has revived a debate in the United States about how to manage such waste and has led to new recriminations over a derailed plan for a national repository in Nevada.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:25:19 AM EST
Even if we decided to mothball all reactors, the problem of the existing fuel remains.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:26:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
More than 27,000 people are officially dead or missing after the earthquake and tsunami that struck northeastern Japan on March 11th.

According to the National Police Agency, 9,811 people are confirmed dead as of 9 PM on Thursday.

The agency says it has received reports of 17,541 people missing.

Most of the dead and missing are from the 3 hardest hit prefectures of Miyagi, Iwate and Fukushima.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 11:04:56 AM EST
Nuclear disaster hinders search for missing in Fukushima Pref. | Kyodo News
Self-Defense Force personnel said it is possible that many bodies have been left behind in disaster-hit locations in the prefecture, as troops faced difficulty entering areas placed under evacuation orders due to the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. Fukushima Prefecture currently accounts for around 8 percent of the death toll.

People living in a 20-kilometer radius of the plant have been under directives to evacuate and those within 20 km to 30 km have been advised to stay indoors.

SDF rescue workers deployed in Fukushima have thus focused on assisting the evacuation of residents, including bed-ridden hospital patients, rather than searching for the missing, they said.



So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 11:15:30 AM EST
NHK WORLD English
The Defense Ministry says temperatures at 4 nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant have fallen below 20 degrees Celsius.

The ministry has been using helicopters to take infrared surveys of the surface temperatures of facilities at the stricken plant since Saturday.

The 30-minute survey, which was done from around 7 AM on Thursday, also found that the storage pool for spent fuel at the No. 3 reactor has cooled to about 30 degrees.

The ministry says the surface temperature of the No. 1 reactor was 13 degrees Celsius, that of No. 2 stood at 13 degrees, No. 3 at 11 degrees, and No. 4 at 17 degrees.
All readings were down from a day earlier.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 12:45:04 PM EST
Good news.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 12:50:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Those would be aerial IR type measurements taken via UAV or helicopter and would primarily indicate that they have gotten the spent fuel pools under control. Given all of the water that has been sprayed and the depth of the reactors inside concrete containment this might not say much about reactor vessel temperatures.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 03:17:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Restoration efforts continue at damaged nuke plant  NHK World

Electricity supply has been restored at the control room of the No.1 reactor of the quake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, says lights in the control room were switched on again before noon on Thursday, 2 days after lights were turned on in the control room of the No.3 reactor. Work to restore outside power sources was suspended on Wednesday after dark smoke billowed from the No.3 reactor building.

Workers at the reactor continued efforts to launch a test run of a pump to supply fresh water using outside power sources. But the pump remains unusable as it's not known how much water is left in the reactor tank.

TEPCO, meanwhile, says three people working in a turbine building near the No.3 reactor were exposed to 173 to 180 millisieverts of radiation. Operations have been halted on the reactor's first floor and basement.

Pumps were inspected at the No.2 and 4 reactors.
Inspectors are said to be facing difficulty at the No.2 reactor due to high levels of radiation.



"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 03:14:03 PM EST
Canadian Nuclear Plant Leaks Radioactive Water Into Lake Ontario - Planetsave.com: climate change and environmental news

With all the focus placed on the Japanese radiation leak as well as the toxic plume of radioactive particles (possibly containing uranium and plutonium) heading for the United States, another potential disaster is receiving virtually no attention.

Of course, attention should be paid to the Japanese situation. Nevertheless, it seems the continent of North America is being hit from two sides in terms of radiation danger.

On March 16, a report was released by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) stating that Canada's Ontario Power Generation has released radioactive water into Lake Ontario via a leak in the Pickering A nuclear generating station.

As a result of what appears to be a pump seal failure, tens of thousands of litres of radioactive water escaped the generating station on Monday and ended up in Lake Ontario.

This is concerning for a number of reasons, but it is especially concerning considering the fact that Lake Ontario is the main source of drinking water for millions of people.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 03:47:19 PM EST
NHK WORLD English

Kan pledges full disclosure of reactor information

Japan's prime minister has promised his British counterpart maximum transparency and accuracy when providing information about the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant.

Naoto Kan talked with David Cameron over the telephone on Thursday.

Cameron expressed sympathy for people in Japan's disaster-hit northeastern and said his country offered whatever assistance is needed.

He also said he admires the Japanese people for their calm responses and strong spirits.

Kan expressed gratitude for the rescue work of about 80 British workers in disaster-hit Iwate Prefecture.

He then briefed Cameron the ongoing situation at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant and promised to provide accurate information about the accident.

Thursday, March 24, 2011 21:11 +0900 (JST)



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 04:08:12 PM EST
Upthread, I quoted this:

NHK WORLD English

Japanese authorities have detected a concentration of a radioactive substance 1,600 times higher than normal in soil at a village, 40 kilometers away from the troubled nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture.

The disaster task force in Fukushima composed of the central and local governments surveyed radioactive substances in soil about 5 centimeters below the surface at 6 locations around the plant from last Friday through Tuesday.

The results announced on Wednesday show that 163,000 becquerels of radioactive cesium-137 per kilogram of soil has been detected in Iitate Village, about 40 kilometers northwest of the plant.

Bq/kg (essentially a volumetric unit) for soil, as opposed to Bq/m², doesn't seem to be used often. I failed to find a similar data for the area around Chernobyl (I did find it for Chernobyl fallout other countries, but it's little surprising that the values are mostly well below 163 kBq/kg, except for a 200 kBq/kg reading in Sweden which may be a hot spot), that's when I quoted meat which led to a sidetrack about absorbed radiation from ingested radioactive material. I now found some Chernobyl area data, albeit in a 1998 paper: there are three locations east of Pripyat with Cs-137 levels between 120 and 130 kBq/kg, but the Red Forest sample was 1,472 kBq/kg.

As for limits, after some search, I found Council Directive 96/29/Euratom, which lists Cs-137 with a 10 kBq/kg limit.

As for the Fukushima fallout in Bq/m² units, I couldn't find any Japanese government data. However, I just read in taz that the IAEA posted some earlier this week:

Fukushima Nuclear Accident Update Log

Measurement of gamma dose rate and beta-gamma contamination were taken on 20 March at more locations. The dose-rate results ranged from 2-160 microsieverts per hour, which compares to a typical natural background level of around 0.1 microsieverts per hour. High levels of beta-gamma contamination have been measured between 16-58 km from the plant. Available results show contamination ranging from 0.2-0.9 MBq per square metre.

Now this can be compared with Chernobyl (with the quibble that this seems to be total radioactivity including the shorter half-life elements, the numbers below are caesium-137 only). According to the map Migeru posted, the threshold for the Permanent Control Zone was 15 curie/km², and for the Closed Zone, 40 curie/km². The first equals 0.555 MBq/m², the second 1.48 MBq/m².

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 05:20:09 PM EST
About 40% of the level in the Chernobyl "closed zone", and the source is still active but the shorter lived isotopes will die down relatively quickly when (if?) the emissions are stopped. But the levels could well exceed those at the Chernobyl "closed zone" in another two to three weeks, and, in a worst case scenario, could dwarf the Chernobyl readings. Even presuming they only equal Chernobyl levels how can it be denied that Fukushima should be rated at least a 6 if not a 7?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 11:41:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Radiation 10,000 times normal level found in water that hit workers | Kyodo News

Water which three workers were exposed to at the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant contained radioactive materials 10,000 times the normal level, plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Friday.

The finding underlines the possibility that part of the fuel in the No. 3 reactor of the plant or the spent fuel stored in the pool in the reactor building may be damaged.

The three, who are from a company cooperating with TEPCO, were involved in work to restore power to the No. 3 reactor, which has lost cooling function. They were working in the basement of the reactor's turbine building when they were irradiated.

Two of the three have been hospitalized due to possible burns caused by beta rays which can cause major skin damage. They were not wearing boots at the time and therefore their feet were soaked in the water.

TEPCO said almost no water was present during an on-site inspection the previous day and also that the level of radiation was low during the inspection.

''Because of this, the workers were believed to have continued their work even after their dosimeters' alarm went off, assuming a problem with the machine,'' a TEPCO official said.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 08:51:58 PM EST
They were not wearing boots at the time and therefore their feet were soaked in the water.

This gets weirder and weirder. You wouldn't expect someone on an ordinary building site to be bootless - never mind someone in the bowels of a potentially lethal ruined nuclear site.

''Because of this, the workers were believed to have continued their work even after their dosimeters' alarm went off, assuming a problem with the machine,'' a TEPCO official said.

Huh? All three alarms must have gone off - and they ignored them?

This sounds like barefaced lying to me. Whatever the real story is, I doubt it has much in common with the official version.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:30:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well if they're  connecting up cables and are contractors, you'd expect them to be power company workers, and the last thing you'd do in that job is not be wearing your rubber boots.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:47:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Perhaps they were wearing radiation suits that were not designed for wading through ankle deep radioactive water?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 11:43:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I heard the boots leaked. Maybe their hazmat suits were designed for dry conditions.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 03:51:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well I dont know as it was lost in translation through the journalist, but on TV the presenter said that it's 10,000 times the radioactivity of water thats normally flowing through a nuclear reactor, not just 10,000 times normal environmental water. I wish Id caught the beginning of that NISA scientist press conference properly, rather than just the journalist roundup at the end.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:42:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
3.9 million Becquerel per cubic centimetre was the reading from that water apparently, and having listened again it wasnt lost in translation, they did say 10,000 times  more radiation than inside a reactor.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:46:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That does sound an incredible ammount, wonder if theyve got million and milli mixed up

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 10:12:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHK WORLD English
The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency spoke to reporters on Friday about an accident in which 3 workers were exposed to radiation in the turbine building of the No. 3 reactor.

It said 3.9 million becquerels of radiation was detected from 1 cubic centimeter of water sampled from the floor of the building. The radiation level was about 10,000 times higher than the water inside a normally operating nuclear reactor.

That's 3.9 billion Bq/kg...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 09:30:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Isn't the turbine building a separate building from the reactor?

If I am not mistaken, in the picture the reactors are the 4 square buildings on top and the turbines are in the rectangulat buildings at the bottom.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 09:35:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think so, its the only logical place to have them, between the reactors and the outlet intake pool

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 09:46:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep:

These BWR reactors do not have a secondary circuit.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 10:37:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Theres a couple of emergency steam valves  in the pipework between reactor and turbine room, that I came across when looking for one of the radioactive materials,its in a PDF somewhere in here. there it discusses test closures under emergency shutdown on BWRs, and the ammount of escaping steam that occurred. the valves were supposedly leaking much more than was allowed

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 10:42:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan iodine release lower than Chernobyl: Scientific American

VIENNA/OSLO, March 23 (Reuters) - The release of two types of radioactive particles in the first 3-4 days of Japan's nuclear crisis is estimated to have reached 20-50 percent of the amounts from Chernobyl in 10 days, an Austrian expert said on Wednesday.

The calculations published by Austria's Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics may add to growing concern in Japan and elsewhere over the contamination of food products such as milk and vegetables in areas near the Japanese reactor site.

On Tuesday, France's IRSN radiation protection and nuclear safety institute estimated that leaks of radiation from the Fukushima plant crippled by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami represented about 10 percent of those from Chernobyl, the world's worst nuclear disaster, in 1986.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:05:44 PM EST
Spiegel picture, claimed to be Tsunami approaching damaged power plant, unsure about the source of the claims

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:11:17 PM EST
The article says the photo was released by Japan's Transport Ministry. There's this ground-level photo with wreckage and a fire truck, too:

...and a photo of the control room in No. 2:

...and the control room of No. 1:



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 04:42:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Children's thyroids not affected by radiation | Kyodo News

Children living outside the zone where residents have been urged to stay indoors following the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant have not had their thyroids affected by leaked radioactive materials, the government said Friday.

The announcement was based on the government's checkups Thursday on 66 children aged 1 to 15 in Kawamata, Fukushima Prefecture, which is located northwest of the plant and outside the state-set indoor evacuation zone -- within 20 kilometers to 30 km radius of the plant



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:17:46 PM EST
Glad to know that.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 11:54:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Better to say it now -- while they still can.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 11:55:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 275 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
Asahi Shimbun, quoting Japan NRC, says #Fukushima event has become a Level 6 on INES scale. Courtesy Steve Herman reporter for VOA japan #W7VOA


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 09:18:44 PM EST
Work to restore power resumed at the quake-stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant on Friday morning.   NHK World  Friday, March 25, 2011 11:46 JST  

Workers are checking if there is any damage to equipment at the No.1 to No.4. reactors. Lights in the No.2 reactor's control room are expected to be switched on again on Friday.

The Fukushima office of Tokyo Electric Power Company says the surface temperature of the No.1 reactor dropped to about 205 degrees Celsius on Friday morning. It had risen to about 400 degrees, exceeding the safety limit of 302 degrees.

TEPCO also says the pressure inside the container vessel of the No.1 reactor dropped to 0.31 megapascals from 0.385 on Thursday morning.

In the turbine building of the No.3 reactor, work is under way to drain the highly radioactive water that 3 staff members were exposed to on Thursday. Its radiation level was 10,000 times higher than those for water inside the reactor.



"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 24th, 2011 at 11:53:33 PM EST
Fukushima radioactive fallout nears Chernobyl levels  New Scientist  24 March 2011

Japan's damaged nuclear plant in Fukushima has been emitting radioactive iodine and caesium at levels approaching those seen in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Austrian researchers have used a worldwide network of radiation detectors - designed to spot clandestine nuclear bomb tests - to show that iodine-131 is being released at daily levels 73 per cent of those seen after the 1986 disaster. The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 per cent of the amount released from Chernobyl.

The difference between this accident and Chernobyl, they say, is that at Chernobyl a huge fire released large amounts of many radioactive materials, including fuel particles, in smoke. At Fukushima Daiichi, only the volatile elements, such as iodine and caesium, are bubbling off the damaged fuel. But these substances could nevertheless pose a significant health risk outside the plant.
....

The level of radionuclides leaking from Fukushima Daiichi has been unclear, but the CTBT air samplers can shed some light, says Gerhard Wotawa of Austria's Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics in Vienna.

For the first two days after the accident, the wind blew east from Fukushima towards monitoring stations on the US west coast; on the third day it blew south-west over the Japanese monitoring station at Takasaki, then swung east again. Each day, readings for iodine-131 at Sacramento in California, or at Takasaki, both suggested the same amount of iodine was coming out of Fukushima, says Wotawa: 1.2 to 1.3 × 1017 becquerels per day.

The agreement between the two "makes us confident that this is accurate", he says. So do similar readings at CTBT stations in Alaska, Hawaii and Montreal, Canada - readings at the latter, at least, show that the emissions have continued.



"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 12:27:10 AM EST
Interesting how the same news is spun differently above ("Fukushima radioactive fallout nears Chernobyl levels") and upthread ("Japan iodine release lower than Chernobyl").

iodine-131 is being released at daily levels 73 per cent of those seen after the 1986 disaster. The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 per cent of the amount released from Chernobyl.

Now, rate of emission is one thing; duration is another: but how long did Chernobyl emit radioactive smoke?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 04:34:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
60% and 73% are as good as 100% "for government work". The difference is hairsplitting.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 05:18:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
DoDo:
rate of emission is one thing; duration is another: but how long did Chernobyl emit radioactive smoke?
It would appear that the fire in the reactor was put out the same day, the 26th of April.

Because of the Soviet lack of transparency it was possible for them to send in firefighters without telling them what they were working on. It was also possible for the authorities to start evacuating Pripyat within 48 hours, before Forsmark in Sweden raised the alert due to the radiation levels. It was also possible for the Soviets to deploy thousands of "liquidators" to do the cleanup after the fire was out.

Here we have a situation where safety of emergency workers is taken seriously and information flows relatively openly, which probably results in slower crisis response and contamination over longer times.

Compare the incident of the Japanese workers wading ankle-deep in radioactive water with the Chernobyl firefighters.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 05:38:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It would appear that the fire in the reactor was put out the same day, the 26th of April.

No, only the secondary fires, the graphite moderator fire in the reactor "continued to burn for many days". I found this: Chernobyl - A breakdown of communication between scientists and the public

After ten hours of trying to put the fire out with water it was apparent that this would not work. For over a week helicopters dumped lead and sand onto the smoldering reactor in an attempt to extinguish the fire. This to did not work. Nitrogen was next used to cool the fire and deprive it of oxygen. Finally on May the sixth the fire was brought under control.

That's ten days then.

Here we have a situation where safety of emergency workers is taken seriously and information flows relatively openly, which probably results in slower crisis response and contamination over longer times.

And, fortunately, also the timely evacuation of poulations from the areas affected by the fallout.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 06:15:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Chernobyl disaster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The fires were extinguished by 05:00, but many firefighters received high doses of radiation. The fire inside Reactor No. 4 continued to burn until 10 May 1986
Right.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 06:59:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So now 6 May (10 days) or 10 May (14 days)? From this report, it appears 10 May was the end of the helicopter dropping missions. At any rate, this contemporary New Scientist says that the actual release stopped much later, on June 6. Elsewhere, I find an account barely mentioning graphite fire (and a linked diagram in pdf showing a sharp drop on 6 May):

Chapter II The release, dispersion and deposition of radionuclides - Chernobyl: Assessment of Radiological and Health Impact

The release pattern over time is well illustrated in Figure 3 (Bu93). The initial large release was principally due to the mechanical fragmentation of the fuel during the explosion. It contained mainly the more volatile radionuclides such as noble gases, iodines and some caesium. The second large release between day 7 and day 10 was associated with the high temperatures reached in the core melt. The sharp drop in releases after ten days may have been due to a rapid cooling of the fuel as the core debris melted through the lower shield and interacted with other material in the reactor. Although further releases probably occurred after 6 May, these are not thought to have been large.

...Although the releases were considerably reduced on 5 and 6 May (days 9 and 10) after the accident), continuing low-level releases occurred in the following week and for up to 40 days after the accident, particularly on 15 and 16 may, attributable to continuing outbreaks of fires or to hot areas in the reactor. These later releases can be correlated with increased concentrations of radionuclides in air measured at Kiev and Vilnius.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 07:33:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ARGeezer:
The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 per cent of the amount released from Chernobyl.
What!?

There goes the "Chernobyl was a special case because it didn't have containment like western reactors do"...

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 05:07:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Kyodo - Gov't asks people within 20-30 km of nuke plant to leave voluntarily    

The Japanese government has encouraged people living within 20 to 30 kilometers of the troubled nuclear plant in Fukushima Prefecture to leave voluntarily, with concerns over access to daily necessities rather than resident safety prompting the advice, top government spokesman Yukio Edano said Friday.

The chief Cabinet secretary told a news conference that the government told heads of affected municipalities within 20 to 30 km of the plant that it is encouraging people to voluntarily move farther away and will give its full support in helping them relocate.

With many residents living between 20 and 30 km of the Fukushima Daiichi complex already voluntarily evacuating and more wanting to leave the area, Edano said it is ''preferable'' for people to leave of their own accord, given the difficulties they were encountering in their daily lives.

''The distribution of goods is stalled, and it is rather difficult to maintain their daily living over a long period of time,'' he said, adding that the government will provide logistical assistance in terms of transportation and facilities to accept those moving more than 30 km from the plant.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 04:13:37 AM EST
Obviously when they quarantined them in their homes they were not expecting this to last over 2 weeks.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 05:16:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
either that, or with the other disasters and associated fuel shortage, it was a case of moving and resettling those at the most risk first. and the rest of the high risk when things are more in order.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 05:44:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The way this is going, and considering that Chernobyl's exclusion zone is 30km...

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 05:46:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
At this rate we're going to need a Not as Bad as Chernobyl™ macro.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 05:56:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Just like Not as Bad as Saddam or Not as Bad as Bush.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 06:08:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Reuters -  Workers exposed to 10,000 times safe radiation: Japan  

while China said two Japanese travelers arriving in the country were found to have exceedingly high radiation levels.

No one in Japan, other than the three workers at the reactor have been reported exposed to high radiation.

"Tests showed that the two travelers seriously exceeded the limit," China's General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine said, referring to radiation levels.  



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 04:33:46 AM EST
reuters- the two Japanese travellers found with radiation levels "seriously exceeding limits" in China came from two cities. one is 200km far away from fukushima and another is 300km. They said they didn't leave their cities after the earthquake

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 04:41:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
On the striking photo below: tsunami-wrecked cars are stapled on the edge of the Sendai airport runway:

A bigger ship lifted by the tsunami in Sendai harbour:



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 04:45:40 AM EST
Gov't to set standards for resuming nuclear reactors now under checks | Kyodo News

The government plans to set safety standards that nuclear plant operators should clear before restarting reactors after their regular checkups, industry minister Banri Kaieda said Friday, apparently heeding public concerns amid the ongoing nuclear crisis.

Kaieda made the remarks after Kyushu Electric Power Co. said Thursday it has decided to delay rebooting two nuclear reactors at its Genkai nuclear power plant in Saga Prefecture that have been had suspended for servicing in view of the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

The company serving the Kyushu region in southwestern Japan originally planned to resume operations of the No. 2 and No. 3 reactors in late March and early April.

The economy, trade and industry minister said that Kyushu Electric's latest decision is ''reasonable'' and added that the government hopes to announce what he calls a safety guideline for the resumption of such reactors possibly next week.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 05:46:02 AM EST
URGENT: China bans imports of food from 5 Japanese prefectures | Kyodo News
China's quarantine authorities have by Friday banned imports of food produced in the five Japanese prefectures of Fukushima, Ibaraki, Tochigi, Gunma and Chiba in the wake of the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex.

Now according to the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, those prefectures hold the following percentages of the national population and are self sufficient (in calories) to the following extent (Source pdf)

Fukushima 1.6% population  85% sufficient
Ibaraki   2.3% population  70% sufficient
Tochigi   1.6% population  74% sufficient
Gunma     1.6% population  32% sufficient
Chiba     4.8% population  29% sufficient

So the banned areas are around 6% of the national food supply

From the same report, the country only produces 41% of its consumed food so in effect it's a fraction short on 15% of the countrys food production out of use

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 06:35:09 AM EST
Japan earthquake | Page 288 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
U.S. Pacific Command YOKOSUKA, Japan (Mar. 25, 2011) - Barge YOGN-115, carrying 1.04 million litres (275,000 gallons) of fresh water, departs Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka (CFAY) to support cooling efforts at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. CFAY port operations cleaned and filled two barges, totaling nearly 1.89 million litres (500,000 gallons) of fresh water. (SOURCE: US Pacific Command on Facebook)


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 06:53:37 AM EST
2 weeks pass since disaster, death toll tops 10,000 | Kyodo News

Two weeks after the devastating March 11 earthquake and tsunami hit Japan, more than 240,000 people were still sheltering in some 2,000 evacuation centers as of Friday while the official death toll topped 10,000.

Direct damage from the disaster, including destroyed houses and roads, is estimated to cost a total of between 16 trillion to 25 trillion yen, while radiation leaks at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi power plant have caused widespread anxiety.

According to the National Police Agency, more than 27,500 people were either confirmed dead or remain unaccounted for as of 6 p.m. Friday -- 10,066 deaths and 17,452 missing.

The full extent of loss of life remains unclear, partly because search efforts in Fukushima Prefecture have been hampered by the nuclear emergency, while local police in Miyagi Prefecture have suggested it is likely that more bodies will be recovered from the sea.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 07:08:48 AM EST
High-level radiation suspected to be leaking from No. 3 reactor's core | Kyodo News

High-level radiation detected Thursday in water at the No. 3 reactor's turbine building at the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant appears to have originated from the reactor core, the government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said Friday.

But no data, such as on the pressure level, have suggested the reactor vessel has been cracked or damaged, agency spokesman Hidehiko Nishiyama emphasized at an afternoon press conference, backing down from his previous remark that there is a good chance that the reactor has been damaged. It remains uncertain how the leakage happened, he added.

A day after three workers were exposed Thursday to water containing radioactive materials 10,000 times the normal level at the turbine building connected to the No. 3 reactor building, highly radioactive water was found also at the No. 1 and No. 2 reactors' turbine buildings.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 08:30:37 AM EST
NHK WORLD English

Kitazawa: US to help avoid salt damage in reactors

Japan's defense minister says the government plans to switch from seawater to fresh water to cool the crippled reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, with the support of US forces.

Toshimi Kitazawa told reporters on Friday that the United States urged Japan to quickly switch to fresh water, and offered to help do so.

...The US forces and Japan's Self-Defense Forces have drawn up plans to anchor off the Fukushima coast US Navy barges capable of carrying large amounts of water, and send water via pipelines to the plant.
The US military is also to provide a high-powered pump to send water through the pipelines, and Japanese SDF vessels are to be mobilized to refill the barges with water.

The US vessels have already left their base in Yokosuka, near Tokyo. The US forces and SDF hope to set up the pipelines and other systems for the operation as soon as next week.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 09:25:55 AM EST
Too bad this was not done a week ago.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 11:57:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Natural disaster exemption not to apply to Tokyo Electric: Edano | Kyodo News

Tokyo Electric Power Co., the operator of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant crippled by the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami earlier this month, will not be subject to a disclaimer that relieves utilities from paying compensation in connection with nuclear power plant accidents caused by devastating natural disasters, the government's top spokesman said Friday.

Such an exemption from liability is ''impossible under current social circumstances,'' Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said at a press conference.

The law on such compensation carries a waiver clause under which the government, rather than a nuclear power plant operator, would pay compensation for damage caused by a nuclear accident resulting from ''an unusually huge natural disaster or a social upheaval.''



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 09:54:49 AM EST
Good news for the victims, if not for the taxpayers.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 11:59:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Kan gives no answer about when Japan's nuclear crisis may end | Kyodo News

Prime Minister Naoto Kan on Friday left open what the Japanese people and the international community most want to know -- whether the ongoing crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant would be brought under control anytime soon -- effectively saying only that the government is putting all its efforts into preventing the situation from worsening.

In a news conference two weeks after the deadly quake and tsunami in northeastern Japan, Kan explained that the government is now concentrating its efforts on the nuclear crisis, caused by the twin natural disasters, and relief and reconstruction measures.

Appearing before the press for the first time in a week, Kan was asked when he thinks the government would be able to take control of the grave situation at the 40-year-old nuclear plant. But he evaded answering the question.

Instead, Kan said, ''We are trying to avoid an aggravation of the situation. But I recognize that it is still not a time to predict what will happen.''



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 09:57:06 AM EST
ceebs:

Kan was asked when he thinks the government would be able to take control of the grave situation at the 40-year-old nuclear plant. But he evaded answering the question.

Instead, Kan said, ''We are trying to avoid an aggravation of the situation. But I recognize that it is still not a time to predict what will happen.''

No, he was honest and avoided bullshitting people with "sure, everything's gonna be all right".

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 11:05:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
2 of 3 radiation-exposed workers suffer internal exposure | Kyodo News

Two of the three workers who were exposed to high-level radiation and sustained possible burns at a crisis-hit nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture have likely suffered ''internal exposure'' in which radioactive substances have entered their bodies, but they are not showing early symptoms and do not require treatment, a national radiation research center said Friday.

The National Institute of Radiological Sciences, where the three arrived earlier in the day for highly specialized treatment, said the two were exposed to 2 to 6 sieverts of radiation below their ankles, whereas exposure to 250 millisieverts is the limit set for workers dealing with the ongoing crisis, the worst in Japan's history.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 12:27:29 PM EST
Japan earthquake | Page 290 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
European leaders agreed on Friday to set the "highest standards" of nuclear safety, in part by subjecting reactors to "stress tests," to guard against crises like that at Japan's stricken Fukushima plant. www.reuters.com


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 12:40:20 PM EST
stress test n sham, see banking

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 12:54:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan earthquake | Page 290 | Liveblog live blogging | Reuters.com
@Reuters_YeshaShah Great. Chernobyl was a botched "stress test", if I recall correctly.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 12:58:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fresh coolant injected, high-radiation water leaks in nuke crisis | Kyodo News

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Friday it has begun injecting freshwater into the No. 1 and No. 3 reactor cores at the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant to enhance cooling efficiency, but highly radioactive water was later found leaking near all four troubled reactor units at the plant.

A day after three workers were exposed to water containing radioactive materials 10,000 times the normal level at the turbine building connected to the No. 3 reactor building, a water pool with similarly highly concentrated radioactive materials was found in the No. 1 reactor's turbine building, causing some restoration work to be suspended, it said.

Pools of water that may have seeped from either the reactor cores or spent fuel pools were also found in the turbine buildings of the No. 2 and No. 4 reactors, measuring up to 1 meter and 80 centimeters deep, respectively, while those near the No. 1 and No. 3 reactors were up to 40 cm and 1.5 meters deep.

The latest development in Japan's worst nuclear crisis raises the risk of more workers being exposed to radioactive substances, hindering their efforts to restore the plant's crippled cooling functions that are key to overcoming the crisis.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 12:57:52 PM EST
Quake affects Japan's domestic output of 356,600 cars | Kyodo News

The recent devastating earthquake has prevented eight major Japanese automakers from producing a total of 356,600 vehicles amid substantially curtailed operations, according to figures released by the companies by Friday.

As many remain uncertain about when their plants will resume full-fledged operations due largely to parts shortages, the figure is likely to increase.

The impact of the March 11 9.0-magnitude quake could eventually be smaller as some manufacturers are expected to raise output once full-fledged operations resume.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 01:06:59 PM EST
Tsunami vs Japanese Harbor - Boing Boing
This eyewitness video of the March 11 tsunami striking Japan shows how, in under 10 minutes, a harbor in Oirase Town, Aomori Prefecture goes from business as usual to, well, gone. While other videos have shown massive destruction or endless floods, this one shows a huge dry area that completely fills with water, making it easy to see just how much water was being pushed around. It's so hard to believe this actually happened.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 25th, 2011 at 01:19:15 PM EST


So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 04:14:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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