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Wednesday Open Thread

by dvx Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 11:23:27 AM EST

Wednesdazed and confused.


Display:
Because it's almost spring.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt t gmail dotcom) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 11:25:20 AM EST
For reasons that elude me, that reminded me of this (don't laugh).

And is it me, or does Greg lake look like Jodie Foster in that picture ?


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 12:47:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hmmm, let's see:



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt t gmail dotcom) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 01:49:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Pretentious? Moi?"

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 01:50:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh deaf-nut-lee. But I do like Trilopgy, there's much on it to like. Wheras Tarkus, which is more sort of a sub jazz-rock gone bad, is just bollocks from start to finish. I listened to it on youtube just cos I hadn't in decades and had forgotten it, but it reminded me why I'd got rid of it.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 01:59:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If we're doing the Piano Music Thing©:



She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 01:31:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Aaah, Bergen Eddy, AKA Chopping of the North. Dab hand with the 88s. Probably the Father of Trolling.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 01:48:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
He was a dab hand, not quite as good as the best of Satie tho'

(IMHO)

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 02:27:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 02:56:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Pekka Pohjola was a friend, a brilliant musician and, sadly, the booze took him.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:00:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Someone we knew recently died from his drug addictions (booze and cocaine.)

What the hell is it with musicians and drugs?

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:14:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 Well I've yet to meet a  drug dealer who didn't want to hang artound with the cool kids, and pop stars are the ultimate cool kids.  Musicians its always the lifestyle, women and drink and drugs. you want to be a success, you need the image , If they were into money they'd be accountants or bankers

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:34:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
google "artistic mind and depression" or "artistic mind and addiction" for a idea of all of the theories involved.  the right side of the mind is linked to depression and other negative states of mind.  it is also linked to creative expression.
by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:37:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think that's a bit of a tabloid view. Out of all the musicians in all genres the heavy abusers are in a tiny minority. And booze is the big problem, not other 'substances' - as it is in society in general.

If you spend your working life waiting around in venues with bars, or in strange towns with nothing to do before or after the gig, drinking kills time. The real 'pushers' are the people who buy drinks so they can talk to known musicians.

I've worked with maybe 20 - 30 musicians (younger than I) who are no longer with us, or hit rock bottom - and it was/is booze in almost every case. (Over a period of 40 years).

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 04:05:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You know, I'm really bothered by all the "meta-songs" about the life of the musician in which alcohol plays a prominent role.

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 04:25:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You know, I'm really bothered by all the "meta-songs" about the life of the musician (or the music fan) in which alcohol plays a prominent role.

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 04:25:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If the river was whisky
and i was a diving duck
if the river was whisky
and i was a diving duck
i'd dive down to the bottom
never would come up

   -- Sleepy John Estes

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 05:12:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Lluvia de alcohol moja mi cabeza
al salir de la habitación del hotel
donde nos lo hicimos
la noche que te conoci

No necesito más de ti
Ya no me puedes engañar
He cambiado tu colchón
Por una botella de champagne.

Litros de alcohol corren por mis venas, mujer.
No tengo problemas de amor.
Lo que me pasa es que es que estoy loco por privar

--- Ramoncín

En la lluvia pondré mi corazón de R'N'R
y cuando me llene el cuerpo de anfetas y de alcohol
querré alguien a mi lado que me recoja al caer
así nena tendré suerte de llegarte a conocer.
Uhu, uhu, uhu, nena, voy a ser
una "r'n'r star"
uhu, uhu, uhu, nena, voy a ser

--- Loquillo



There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 05:17:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Very nice.

(And I'm not a big fan of the piano.)

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:11:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Very, very, VERY nice.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:24:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
More piano music

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 08:32:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I just watched a fascinating documentary on Hitler's Atlantic wall of Blokhauses

a lot of French firms got very rich building these

in fact, during the war, a lot of French firms got very rich providing all types of services to the Germans, in France and in Germany

in 1940, the number of unemployed people in France was over a million
in 1944, the number or unemployed people in France was 10,000

the Atlantic wall cost as much as having 15 million soldiers but held only for 4 hours.  there are over 15k blokhauses built and still in existence

by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 02:30:24 PM EST
French documentary about the Occupation caused a furor in France when it was released a decade (?) ago.  Never saw it.  Write-ups said it deconstructed various Myths floating around which ... annoyed ... certain segments of the French population.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 02:37:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
there are quite a few.  the process of revelation of what actually occurred during this period in France has been drawn out and very, very delayed.  there have been many documentaries in the last 10 years about various segments of French society and how they behaved during this period.  this documentary shocked me because I assumed that the Blockhauses were built by German soldiers and this myth is addressed in this particular documentary whose name I now forget.

but then, it took 15 years after the war for people to start even counting how many lives the Holocaust has claimed.

by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:41:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
seriously.  after WWII, nobody thought to count the dead at Auschwitz because there were so many dead all over.  it wasn't until 1962 or so that someone thought to try to define the magnitude of the atrocities.
by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:46:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
stevesim:
the process of revelation of what actually occurred during this period in France has been drawn out and very, very delayed.

Quite true. I have actually followed it fairly closely, starting with the book that was the first main shocker, "Vichy France, Old Guard and New Order, 1940-1944" (La France de Vichy) by US historian Robert O Paxton in 1972. There were comfortable myths about Pétain doing his best under German constraint and a France that was all Résistance, that had to be dispelled.

As for industrial production, the Nazis harnessed all France's productive capacity, which had to be devoted to the occupying power according to the terms of the armistice. All the labour was necessarily French (or prisoner), German soldiers were there to occupy. There were willing collaborationists who made money out of the process, but what did not come willingly was requisitioned. The position of company owners was often that, to safeguard the capital and know-how of their firms, it was better to reach agreement with the Germans than suffer punitive requisition - though obviously that position could be camouflage for ideological agreement with the Nazis or naked greed or both.

The Atlantic Wall was a case in point, in that a number of French public works companies willingly contracted with the Todt Organisation to work with German firms on its construction. (One boss, Jean Gosselin, was sentenced after the war to two years prison and the confiscation of all he possessed, another, Pierre Brice was involved in a long-drawn-out postwar case in which he finally got off with a fine; most companies were simply ordered to pay taxes on their wartime profits).

As for labour, attractive wages and benefits were offered for highly-skilled workers, but the mass of ordinary labourers were forced (POWs, Jews, Spanish Republicans), or quasi-forced (young Frenchmen who would otherwise be sent to Germany on the STO scheme). Like all major industrial and military projects of the Nazis, the Atlantic Wall called on a substantial injection of forced, prisoner, or concentration-camp slave-type labour.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 03:16:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
War history books are written by the survivors, and read by the next generation of peacetime soldiers.

There are so many retired army folks here in Colorado Springs that you trip over them when walking down the sidewalk. They're easily identified by caps that show the regiment or ship or Air Force unit in which they served--mostly in the 50s and 60s when nothing was going on. They spend their time watching the History Channel ("How the U.S. of A. Saved The World from Socialism, Communism, and Fascism") and writing letters to the newspaper about the recent total degeneration of society.

by asdf on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 07:50:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, but the rules are different for the rich. They never face sanction. After all, with the exception of the old fool Oswald Mosley who was largely imprisoned for embarrassing the elites, the Hitler supporters amongst the English upper classes carried on with no stain upon their character.

Still, the Atlantic wall could never hold while the army which could have supported it was destroyed on the Eastern Front

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 02:41:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Similar books have been written about the US based companies, banks and the individuals who grew rich and/or otherwise prospered doing business with Germany after WWI, then with Hitler, through the war, and then managed to avoid any significant loss and just picked up where they left off a few years after the war. Brown Brothers Harriman Bank, Cromwell and Sullivan international law firm, John D. Rockefeller and his sons, Henry Ford, General Motors, DuPont, John Foster Dulles, Alan Dulles, Prescott Bush, on and on. You are likely to be labeled a 'conspiracy nut' if you raise such subjects.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 12:14:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think that's really CT territory, it's fairly well documented. The thing is, there were business interests at stake, but also ideological sympathies - at least insofar as the Nazis were seen as a bulwark against the Bolsheviks. That's an aspect that was of course echoed by the French right (and business circles), before and during the war.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 03:54:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think that's really CT territory, it's fairly well documented.

I agree as to the documentation. But I think that CT has become a very blunt instrument with which to intimidate discussion of topics subversive of the existing order, which seems to prefer that all illegal and, especially, treasonous, acts be committed by deranged individuals acting alone.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 11:02:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
IBM, too, right?  Seems there's been a bit on that company's "contribution" to WWII lately.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 04:49:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, they belong on the short list.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 10:56:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
salaries were quite good but I wonder what percentage of the French upper class made its money during this period

the wall was financed by all French as France had to pay for its own occupation

I was also bemused to watch a newsreel during the documentary made by the collaborationist French government about unified (i.e. occupied) Europe being threatened by England and the USA, so not much has really changed in that sense

by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:06:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Did your unnamed and unreferenced documentary mention the 600-650,000 French workers obliged by the Nazis to work in Germany under the Service du Travail Obligatoire? The 250,000 prisoners of war transformed in Germany into "civilian" workers? The (number unknown to me, but non-negligeable) young Frenchmen who took to the Maquis to avoid the STO? That should explain the wham-bang unemployment figures (though exactly what constituted unemployment statistics at the time I don't know and wonder about).

Of course there were collabos, and willing industrialists among them. There were black marketeers too. Some people made money, for sure (though they didn't all end up well with it, like Louis Renault who died in 1944 accused of collaboration with the enemy, and his business was nationalised). But it's a totally biased picture to ignore Nazi requisitioning of all French production, industrial or agricultural. And completely grotesque to suggest that the French were all making out like bandits, thank you, Adolf.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:17:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yes.
by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:18:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If so, why didn't you mention that instead of posting "shock" statistics on unemployment that could be read as suggesting that the French were all doing well out of the Occupation?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:24:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
actually, some French were doing quite well from the occupation. and, unlike you, I am French so I am criticizing my own people.  my uncle died in the Maquis.

a lot of them actually.  it was when the German firms in Germany started lacking manpower that the forced labour began.  and the unemployment numbers were given in the documentary.  I did not invent them.

salaries were quite good for labourers working for the Germans

however, the rations for people not doing manual labour were quite below recommended for maintaining your weight.

by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:29:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
stevesim:
some French were doing quite well from the occupation.

You are contradicting what in my comments?

stevesim:

my uncle died in the Maquis

I'm sorry to hear that, though it must make you proud.

stevesim:

I did not invent them.

I didn't suggest you invented them, though I'd like to know what the documentarists based their numbers on.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:36:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it does not make me proud, it makes me sad. there is nothing to be proud of, because this was an incredible waste of a life.  like all the people killed in wars. he was only 19 years old.  I never got to know him and he is not even buried with his own family but in another département where he was killed.
by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:41:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
there was a lot of collaboration, that is certain.

what galls me about all of this is that women's heads were shaved and the women ostracized when the hands holding the shears were probably making money from serving the Nazis in one way or another.

by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:20:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There's not much evidence either way on who did the shaving. What horrifies me is simply that women's heads were shaved.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:26:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
who cares who did the shaving when one comes away with a shaved head, the other with full pockets - both for being in bed with the Nazis.
by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:31:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
stevesim:
who cares who did the shaving

You, apparently:

stevesim:

the hands holding the shears were probably making money from serving the Nazis in one way or another
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:38:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yes, they probably were
by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:56:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wikipedia says that 217,000 French military people lost their life in the second world war, which was more than half the number of USAians killed, according to the same post regarding deaths in WWII. Lots of people in the USA don't realize how many French soldiers died, constantly referring to how they all just surrendered and "we saved them."  Wasn't too pretty for most people, I feel certain, living through that sort of war.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:38:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the daily death rate during the blitzkrieg in may-june 1940 (when French soldiers fought the advancing German panzers) was actually higher than during the height of the Verdun battles. It was incredibly violent fighting on both sides, with fierce defense on the French side - in any case they certainly did not just watch the panzers get ahead, they tried (unsuccessfully obviously) to block them.


Wind power
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:46:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't doubt it at all.  For the amount of time the French were fighting in WWII, they had a 300,000 dead  in just a few months and of course a lot of prisoners of war. They did not just throw up the white flag.  There were also over 400,000 people involved in the French Resistance and these people were truly heroic in every sense of the word.

But, unfortunately, as France was hopelessly split between the right and left political extremes before the war, this was not the finest hour for many who found the Occupation an economic opportunity.

by stevesim on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 04:52:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The French Army was badly deployed, badly led, badly trained, and - for what was available - badly equipped.  All of which is the direct responsibility of their high command.  

Gamelin was old, his knowledge of 1939 era military technology was lacking, his knowledge of 1939 era military tactics was non-existent, his great idea, Dyle-Breda plan, was from Cloud-Cuckoo Land.

The Allies Command and Control systems were inadequate from the top, Gamelin didn't even have a radio at his GHQ, to the bottom, French tanks weren't equipped with radios either.  The high command was completely snarled.  The corp and division officers thought they were fighting World War One, and deployed accordingly.  Huntziger, in command of the French Second Army and tasked with the defense of Seden, shouldn't have been in command of a platoon of Boy Scouts.  

Only 42 bunkers protected the Sedan bridgeheads on the outbreak of war in September 1939 and an additional 61 were built by 10 May. However, by the 10 May, most of the bunkers were incomplete, lacking gun port shutters for the artillery casemates. Some of the bunkers lacked rear doors, making them vulnerable to infiltration by infantry. To the north of Sedan, on the northern bend of the Meuse, the town of Glaire overlooked the crossing points on the river, which was to be where the German armour would deliver its heaviest blow. There was a gap of 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) between Bunker 305 at Glaire and Bunker 211 next to the Pont Neuf bridge. This allowed an attacker coming from the north to use the good road routes through the Fleigneux-Saint Menges-Glaire axis to enter Sedan from the north.

The defences at Sedan also lacked any mines. The French Second Army was guarding a front of 70 kilometres (43 mi), and was given only 16,000 mines. Of that number 7,000 were given to the cavalry divisions that were to delay a German advance through southern Belgium as well as blockhouse points along the Franco-Belgian border. That left 2,000 for the defence of the river Meuse. Of those, the 55th Infantry Division got 422. Not all of these were laid, and some barriers were moved during the bunker construction in the Sedan sector.

If Huntziger was incompetent, General Lafontaine, commander of the 55th Infantry Division, was criminally negligent.

The organisation of the French 55th Infantry Division was chaotic. Most units had been involved in construction work and were constantly moved to different tactical positions. Of the nine companies in position by 10 May, only a few had been holding their respective positions for even a few days and were not familiar with them. One of the premier infantry regiments, the 213th Infantry Regiment, was removed from the line altogether and was replaced with the 331st Regiment. In some cases Infantry regiments were made up of several different companies from several different battalions from different regiments. For example, the 295th Infantry Regiment's 6th Company, 2nd battalion, was made up of four different companies which were drawn from three different battalions belonging to three different regiments.

Against these completely inadequate defensive positions, manned by two untrained, ill-equipped, disorganized Class B infantry divisions the Germans threw three crack Panzer divisions as part of a total force of 60,000 men, 22,000 vehicles, 771 tanks, 141 artillery pieces and 1,470 aircraft.  

German military doctrine was based on Fire and Movement.  French military doctrine at Seden was, essentially, Sit There and Get Shot.

Even so the forward units of the 55th gave a damn good account of themselves, even the Germans noted it at the time, until Idiot (Lafontaine) told his artillery to halt their interdiction fire "to save ammunition to repeal the assault" allowing the German assault units to assemble and cross the river.  The 55th continued to fight until they basically fell-over exhausted, out of ammunition, out of supplies, no air cover, and without artillery support -- those units heroically ran away during the night.

The German bridgeheads at Sedan could, and should, have been counter-attacked on May 14 and May 15.  With the Germans having one foot on one side and one foot on the other their force was divided, inviting defeat in detail.  No combined arms attack was ever made at Sedan (command failure) and most of the mobile forces needed instead of where they were needed (command failure.)

The main and proximate cause of the French defeat in 1940 was their High Command.  Sloughing the blame off on the "poor fighting ability" of the front-line soldier is what generals and politicians do to "save their reputation."

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 06:15:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That the Spanish civil war had featured wwII tactics vs wwI tactics apparently did nothing at all to highlight the situation.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 03:05:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Another little known statistic is that the D-Day thing the Americans are so very proud of?

Would have barely counted as a day of ordinary attrition, nevermind serious fighting, on the Eastern Front.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 04:04:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Without necessarily disagreeing with your point, the losses at Omaha beach were seriously under-reported to avoid a loss of morale at a time when the outcome was uncertain. In time these under-estimates became "the truth". It's only recently people have gone back and checked the actual records and been shocked by the reality of the slaughter.

D-Day was almost lost at Omaha.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 05:37:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
During my six years in the USA, I haven't been impressed by people's knowledge of history - even US history, yet clichés about all furriners were in no short supply. The Bushies Iraq invasion and subsequent "Freedom fries" farce didn't help of course.
by Bernard (bernard) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 05:04:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Kate Middleton's Effect Rubs Off on Prince Harry

No money changes hands of course, but favours are returned.

The Royals are themselves one of the most stunning examples of product placement ever.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 03:54:14 PM EST

...and sometimes on YouTube among the dross you get the odd intimate gem of a comment, in this case from the video producer himself, Peter Nowlan.

i produced this video, christopher robin collins directed, knocker knowles managed it for magnet records, we shot in a field in provence near jacques loussier's studio, where chris and his band were recording road to hell.

i've always loved it, amazing to find it on here, no-one sings or plays like chris rea. rock on chris, and knocker ... still together after all these years. peter x



"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson
by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 09:08:02 PM EST


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