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More Murdoch Fun

by ceebs Wed Apr 18th, 2012 at 08:27:42 PM EST

A big day once again and the Murdoch press just can't manage once again to stay out of the papers. (Even when in this case it appears to be mostly unconnected) And something big from the US side of the Atlantic too.

Firstly we have  an announcement by the UK's Director of public prosecutions Keir Starmer that the police have today handed  four files to the Crown Prosecution service

The New York times explains this step,
British Prosecutors Consider Charges in Phone Hacking Case - NYTimes.com

Under  Britain's judicial system, criminal charges are drawn up by the Crown Prosecution Service on the basis of evidence gathered by the police. A spokeswoman for the service said that the names of those now being considered for prosecution would not be released, and that the service could not say when it would take the next step, deciding whether to prosecute those involved or not.


According to the Guardian these four cases consist of the following

Met refers phone-hacking files to CPS | Media | The Guardian

It is the first time the CPS has been asked to decide whether to prosecute since the News of the World phone hacking affair began to blow up last year, and comes a week before Rupert Murdoch and his son James are expected to give evidence before the Leveson inquiry into press standards.

The dossiers received by the CPS comprise:

* A file relating to one journalist and one police officer with relation to alleged offences of misconduct in public office and the data protection act.

* A file relating to one journalist and six other members of the public with relation to alleged offences of perverting the course of justice in relation to the phone hacking inquiry.

* A file relating to one journalist with relation to alleged offences of witness intimidation and harassment.

* A file relating to one journalist with relation to alleged offences under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act that covers the interception of communications.

The CPS will not at this stage announce who the individuals are who are  being considered for being taken to court but a variety of people on Twitter have looked at past stories and all come up with pretty much the same range of  suspects that I did whilst reading the reported details. The Independent suggests identical names

Rebekah Brooks could be charged with perverting the course of justice - Crime - UK - The Independent

Rebekah Brooks, the former chief executive of News International, could be charged with perverting the course of justice after her name was included among 11 suspects in the first files handed over to prosecutors by detectives investigating phone hacking, it emerged today.

The Crown Prosecution Service said that it had received four files from police in the last few weeks covering a range of offences allegedly committed by four journalists, a police officer and six members of the public.

The CPS declined to name anybody in the files but said that not all of them had been arrested during Operation Weeting, the hacking inquiry which began in January 2011, and four other linked police inquiries. There was speculation last night that Amelia Hill, a journalist from The Guardian who worked on stories exposing the hacking scandal, was also included among the names in the four files.

So File number one of four by the guardians ordering is the Hill/Policeman case, File two would be the Brooks case which one would think dates back to the Laptop in a bag affair.  File Three, you would think is the Neville Thurlbeck reported witness Intimidation case (As that is the only reported witness intimidation case in the whole affair) which leaves file four. The general suggestion is that it is the case of the  Telegraph reporter involved in the Nightjack case, where an anonymous police blogger was outed by a Newspaper through  having his hotmail account hacked by  a journalist.

If these names are corect then it appears that it is  a general exercise to sweep around the edge of the case, cleaning up all the simple cases from the outside the main ball of phone hacking and its associated complications.  Where things go next all depends on phone hacking charges appearing. (The week before the Leveson Inquiry starts a new module appears to be interesting in that the Police appear to be desperate to show that they are actually doing something, to such an effect that there are a bust of arrests, so maybe there is more to come before Monday)

On the other side of the Atlantic we have had even more fun. It appears the Murdoch organisation may have screwed up to an extent that it may not even be necessary to deploy the FCPA against them to shut their media empire down.

Analysis & Opinion | Reuters

News Corp has found yet another way to annoy investors. The seemingly tardy discovery by Rupert Murdoch's family empire that non-U.S. holders control 36 percent of its voting stock - breaching the 25 percent limit for owners of American television broadcasters - has led it to suspend half the voting rights of overseas owners. Even shareholders resigned to disenfranchisement have cause to worry.

They'll be used to the control exerted by Murdoch. Owners of the company's more numerous A shares don't get a vote at all on most things. And voting B share investors are up against the family's nearly 40 percent stake. In a tacit admission the conglomerate cocked up the monitoring of its shareholder register, the Murdochs agreed not to go beyond that percentage in any vote, even though foreign investors will now only have half the votes they had before.

All the same, the suspension may needle affected shareholders, including the retail and institutional bases in Murdoch's native Australia. But what's really galling is the bungle itself. The Fox TV franchise and other channels in the United States are critical to News Corp's business, and they depend on licenses from the Federal Communications Commission.

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http://www.dailykos.com/story/2012/04/18/1084514/-MurdochGate-Moving-towards-the-Courts#comments

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 18th, 2012 at 08:28:37 PM EST
Police arrest three over alleged illegal payments by journalists | Media | guardian.co.uk

Detectives investigating alleged illegal payments to public officials by journalists have arrested three people.

A former member of the armed forces was among those held when officers from Scotland Yard's Operation Elveden swooped on two houses in Kent and Lancashire in a dawn raid on Thursday.

A 36-year-old man, believed to be Duncan Larcombe, the Sun's royal editor, was arrested at his home in Kent on suspicion of conspiracy to corrupt and conspiracy to cause misconduct in a public office.



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Apr 19th, 2012 at 05:08:27 AM EST
I also think there's quite a story in the extent to which the Met Police are compromised.

We now know they soft-pedalled the investigations into phone hacking to the benefit of News Int.

They tried to hide the interference of News Int in the Milly Dowler murder investigation.

They interfered with the investigation into a murder seemingly instigated to protect a News Int source to ensure that it went nowhere

Senior management co-operated with a News Int campaign to undermine a Police Commissioner who did not meet with Rupert Murdoch's approval.

I think we are now at a point where the Met Police are so institutionally so corrupt that its personnel, from top to bottom, reveal the extent to which they have helped journalists and received favours in kind. Senior management should probably be around the UK and replaced with officers bussed in from the regions.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 19th, 2012 at 09:18:59 AM EST
Tom Watson: News Corp operated like 'shadow state' | Media | guardian.co.uk

Tom Watson, joint writer of Dial M for Murdoch, said that the book also featured allegations that Murdoch's News of the World set out to search for "secret lovers" or "extramarital affairs" of MPs on the culture, media and sport select committee in 2009.

At a packed press conference, Watson, a member of the Commons culture select committee, said that the surveillance revelation - passed onto him by former News of the World chief reporter Neville Thurlbeck - demonstrated how the Murdoch organisation tried to intimidate parliament.

Thurlbeck gave Watson an on-the-record interview, with a witness present, in which he said the then News of the World editor, Colin Myler, told journalists on the Sunday tabloid to "find out everything you can about every single member".

At the time the select committee was conducting its second inquiry into phone hacking, in the wake of revelations in the Guardian that the practice went beyond a single "rogue reporter" at the tabloid.

The aim was to discover "who was gay, who had affairs, anything we can use," according to Thurlbeck, as quoted in the book. "Each reporter was given two members [MPs] and there were six reporters that went on for around 10 days."



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Apr 19th, 2012 at 09:57:50 AM EST
Next week we have James and Rupert up in front of Lord Leveson

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 19th, 2012 at 12:35:17 PM EST
How humbling will that be ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 19th, 2012 at 01:01:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well it's been suggested that there should be a health warning on any drinking games  if the words are "I don't remember"

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Apr 19th, 2012 at 01:26:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Apr 19th, 2012 at 01:39:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Despite Schengen, "This video is not available in your country."

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Apr 19th, 2012 at 02:15:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's all over the anime streaming site Crunchyroll ...

... outside of Europe its most often along the lines of "this series is streaming to North and South America, Australia & NZ, Africa and the Middle East" ... inside Europe its like, "This series is streaming to the UK & Ireland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, and Portugal", or "Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland" ... or "Europe except France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Monaco{+}". Checkerboard European streaming rights are far more common than across the board rights.

{+ There's one more 'France and French' carve-out country that's slipping my memory right now.}

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Mon Apr 23rd, 2012 at 11:17:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There should be a rule saying that you can't own voting stock if you're senile.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Fri Apr 20th, 2012 at 04:48:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Boy, that would really change the proxy fight dynamic in some companies.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Mon Apr 23rd, 2012 at 11:19:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Murdoch's News Corp facing growing legal threat in US | Media | guardian.co.uk
The lawyers are refusing to name the four firm cases of alleged phone hacking inside America they are pursuing, saying that to identify them would be to further breach their privacy. So far all that is known of the original three is that one is a soccer figure, another from Hollywood and a third an American.

Becks? Hugh Grant? That would be good, he wants blood.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Apr 20th, 2012 at 04:23:11 AM EST
News Corp. to Act on Breach of Ownership Rule - WSJ.com

News Corp. said Wednesday it is suspending half the voting rights of its foreign shareholders to deal with an inadvertent breach of the U.S. foreign ownership limits of the Communications Act.

The media company owns 27 television stations, mostly affiliated with the Fox network. The Communications Act of 1934 says that a broadcaster cannot have more than 25% foreign ownership.


Oopsies...

To deal with the breach, News Corp. will suspend 50% of the voting rights of B class voting shares held by non-American shareholders. The suspension will last until the company is in compliance with the ownership limits, the company said.

Shareholders disenfranchisement?

The family of News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch, which controls the company through a roughly 40% voting stake, isn't classified as foreign because Mr. Murdoch and members of his family are American citizens. But the Murdoch family will cap its vote so as to not effectively increase its voting stake during the suspension, the company said

Oh, OK: everything's peachy then...
by Bernard on Fri Apr 20th, 2012 at 04:08:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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