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News International's Big Day

by ceebs Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 01:18:25 AM EST

At 11 AM Alison Levitt QC, Principal Legal Advisor to the Director of Public Prosecutions, got behind the podium at their offices to announce the results of the Operation Weeting investigation.

Phone hacking: Rebekah Brooks, Andy Coulson and six others face charges - live | Media | guardian.co.uk

* Rebekah Brooks, Andy Coulson and five other former News of the World journalists, plus the private investigator Glenn Mulcaire, charged over phone hacking.

* Six ex-News of the World employees, including Brooks and Coulson, face charges of conspiracy to intercept Milly Dowler's voicemail messages.

* The eight charged are: Rebekah Brooks, Andy Coulson, Stuart Kuttner, Glenn Mulcaire, Greg Miskiw, Ian Edmondson, Neville Thurlbeck and James Weatherup.

* All eight charged with a six-year conspiracy to intercept voicemail messages of more than 600 high-profile people.

* Neville Thurlbeck, the former News of the World chief reporter, and James Weatherup, the ex-assistant news editor, charged on suspicion of conspiracy to intercept the voicemails of Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt.

* CPS announce three others will not face charges. Prosecutors defer decision on two other suspects.

Now each of these charges could theoretically be two years of hard time, plus there are other outstanding charges, this is only the first step (or maybe second after the perverting the course of justice cases).


Still outstanding are charges under Operation Elveden, covering corrupt payments to officials, Operation Tuleta, covering a variety of other data interception methods, Operation Kalmyk, an ofshoot of Tuleta covering a subset of computer hacking charges and Operation Rubicon, covering linked charges under Scottish law, and the perjury charges against News Of The World staff during the trials of Tommy Sherridan.

This can't be positive for Cameron, as Reuters says

Coulson, Brooks to be charged for hacking | Reuters

Prime Minister David Cameron's former spin doctor and a friend who was a top executive in Rupert Murdoch's media empire are to be charged with phone hacking, a dramatic twist that may expose the UK leader to more awkward questions about his judgment.

and so for the next year to 18 months, we will continue to get streams of stories reminding people about Cameron's judgment at each stage of the judicial process, until the trials are concluded. Scheduling for the various court cases cannot be easy, spread across multiple court cases, and dual juristictions, and spreading everything out even more. At best it will draw to a hhuddering conclusion just a year before the next general election. At worst, the final stages could be occurring as the next general election campaigns are starting to get into gear. Whatever the state it is hard to see Cameron being anything other than fatally wounded.

At the same time the Leveson Inquiry had its final closing statements, although there may be a suplementary session in a month or two, as a result of dispute between the Daily Mail Group and Lord Leveson over what evidence was going to come out about the earlier Operation Motorman that covered the industry-wide usage of a private investigator. The Daily Mail Group had particularly excessive usage of him, and so was particularly reticent of revealing what its staff were doing publicly.

Also today we have had a dump of further witness statements from the Inquiry, mostly people's suggestions about where future regulation should head, but there were also statements from Chris Bryant, which detail his interaction with the various News International groups and staff.

Display:
Rebekah Brooks, Andy Coulson, and Fleet Street's Elite Charged - The Daily Beast
Eight of Fleet Street's most prominent tabloid journalists face multiple charges of phone hacking, the Crown Prosecution Service announced Tuesday, one year after the phone-hacking scandal erupted at Rupert Murdoch's best-selling Sunday tabloid, News of the World.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 24th, 2012 at 03:52:44 PM EST
I knew I'd missed something out,

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 24th, 2012 at 03:53:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Phone hacking: Accused protest their innocence

Journalists from the now-defunct News of the World (NoW) have protested their innocence after it was announced eight people are facing hacking charges.

Seven ex-staff members, including former editors Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson, will be prosecuted for conspiring to intercept voicemails.

The CPS said the charges related to 600 alleged victims between 2000 and 2006.

Mrs Brooks said a charge relating to murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler's voicemail was "particularly upsetting".



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 24th, 2012 at 03:56:46 PM EST
Well, they would, wouldn't they ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 02:59:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
well there's lots of Lawyers out there saying "How have their lawyers let them do that" it's really reccomended not to issue statements like that, it may sound good, but a good prosecution lawyer may use them against you, or  others.  

The main reason I haven't included peoples statements is legal. the Guardian started by throwing them all up online, then had a quick panic and took at least one down, as its lawyers realised that one of the statements appeared to accuse one or two of the other accused of involvement. Now this may be ok for the individual, but for a publisher to put this out risks predjudicing the upcoming trial, and nobody wishes to be the one who the finger is pointed at to justify its abandonment


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 04:12:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But surely, the moment they are issued by their defendants lawyers, they are in the public domain and can be reported freely ?

Or does free speech not apply to things said by lawyers ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 07:57:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well the worry is, if it's sufficiently widely published, the Judge could allow a claim that it was no longer possible to have a fair trial, as people have already made up their minds. The closer to the trial date, the more likely for that to happen.   It's not beyond the bounds of possibility that the defendents lawyers might push to make that happen as a realistic possibility for their clients to avopid incarceration.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 08:29:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
AT the very least it is desirable to be able to note that the data was released, or make a credible accusation that it was released, by defense lawyers to poison the well of potential jurors. But if the Guardian puts the data up on its website this becomes much more difficult to maintain.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 12:48:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Leveson Inquiry: The big numbers

For more than 100 days during the past 11 months, many of the UK's most powerful people have appeared before Lord Justice Leveson to offer their thoughts on the future of the British press, following allegations newspaper employees had been illicitly hacking people's mobile-phone voicemail messages.

Now the oral hearings have come to an end at the Leveson Inquiry - expected to cost £5.6m - here is a look at its scale, how many words were spoken, who appeared, and which of the key witnesses struggled to remember.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 24th, 2012 at 03:58:32 PM EST
For some reason the BBC seems to have missed Adam Smith off the list. when I asked about this I was told that they hadn't included him as they had only included those people who people would know, and there were plenty of other people who had scored above fourty.

when I pointed out that there wasn't and I had the whole inquiry on spreadsheetes in front of me, they've gone very quiet.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 24th, 2012 at 04:05:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC awfully busy these days pimping the Olympics and the militant Syrian rebel forces.  Not sure which one they're having more success with.
by Marie2 on Tue Jul 24th, 2012 at 04:23:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The BBC journos are really not very good at checking basic facts or challenging consensus, they generally do what their editor wants rather than following a story where it must go. Many of them take their lede from the Daily Mail and never step outside institutional editorial priorities.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 03:03:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Phone-hacking charges meet with sound of silence from News Corp | UK news | The Guardian

Silence, then a lawyer's statement of regret, was all that emerged from Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation after it emerged that two former editors, a managing editor, four senior reporters and private investigator Glenn Mulcaire faced 19 charges of conspiring to hack into phones.

For the past year, the media giant has increasingly acknowledged the gravity of the hacking crisis, starting with the closure of the News of the World - and recently deciding to spin off the Sun and the Times and its other newspapers to a separate company. The charging decisions now mean a high-profile courtroom airing of the phone-hacking story is inevitable.

It was possible that the CPS would choose not to lay charges, although Rebekah Brooks separately faces three obstruction of justice charges, while Andy Coulson has been charged with perjury by a Scottish court. A CPS decision to take no further action would have prompted a very different company reaction. But Alison Levitt QC, as the Crown Prosecution Service's principal legal adviser, concluded that prosecutions were required "in the public interest" - meaning the media group has to now endure the full exposure of trials: court cases in which all sorts of material could be aired, never mind witnesses demanded, in an adversarial environment.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 24th, 2012 at 04:19:30 PM EST
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cartoon/2012/jul/24/2?CMP=twt_gu

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jul 24th, 2012 at 08:25:53 PM EST
So what will this mean for the Murdoch empire?

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 07:50:48 AM EST
This round of court cases will have very little damage, however, the other set of perverting the course of Justice will point more at the executive level, and so will possibly be more damaging.

On top of that we have a third round of court cases that spread out into other newspapers, now we know that there are extra bits pointing to the Sun in this, If there are also bits pointing to The News International Broadsheets then we could see a perception that the whole UK print organisation is rotten.

Leading on from that we know that at least 30,000 documents have been forwardsd on to the FBI. a few people who have been moved on from the UK to the US could start a whole new range of rolling Chaos for  newscorp then starts, but it all depends on the US elections.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 08:45:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are already reports of pending legal action by US citizens or residents who were hacked by News Corp related agents. Some cases may have been filed.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 12:53:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There is this:
A second London lawyer is understood to have started exploring the possibility of legal proceedings over alleged phone hacking across the Atlantic. This lawyer, who declined to be named because proceedings had not been filed, claimed there was "considerable evidence" that a celebrity client had had voicemail messages intercepted by the now closed News of the World while on US soil.

The fresh legal moves mark a broadening of the attack on Murdoch's media empire, whose multimillion-dollar US headquarters has so far remained untouched by the scandal that has engulfed the group's UK newspaper operation.

The potential US lawsuits are understood to relate mainly to public figures who believe their phones were hacked while in America, where voicemail interception could constitute a violation of US telecommunications and privacy laws.

Lewis will next week begin discussions with his New York-based legal partner Norman Siegel, former director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, over the details of US law as it applies to phone hacking.


And this:
The negative attention garnered by the scandal eventually reached the United States, where News Corporation is headquartered and operates multiple media outlets. The Federal Bureau of Investigation launched a probe on 14 July 2011, to determine whether News Corporation accessed voicemails of victims of the 9/11 attacks. On 15 July, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced an additional investigation by the Department of Justice, looking into whether the company had violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

And this:
Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.) on Wednesday asked Lord Justice Brian Leveson -- who is leading a British judicial inquiry into the scandal in Britain -- to turn over any findings that indicate if U.S. laws were broken by journalists or other employees of News Corp., the conglomerate Murdoch controls.

Rockefeller is chairman of the Senate commerce committee, which has broad oversight of American businesses and the Federal Communications Commission. An aide to Rockefeller stressed on Thursday that he hasn't called for an official committee investigation of New York-based News Corp. and that he simply wants information that may have surfaced during the Leveson inquiry.

The Justice Department and FBI are in the midst of two investigations into the hacking scandal. One seeks to learn if any News Corp. employees engaged in phone hacking in the United States; another is aimed at determining whether bribes paid to British officials by journalists at two News Corp. papers, the now-defunct News of the World and the Sun, for newsworthy information constituted a breach of a U.S. anti-bribery law, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.


Note that this last article, from WAPO, runs the article in its Style section.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 01:11:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
was fairly certain the Rokerfella one was just grandstanding. FBI and Police already have links and agreements to hand things over i so it's all being done in the background. Leveson has been set up specifically to avoid asking the questions that could impinge upon criminal charges, so any evidence of things like that won't come out there.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Jul 25th, 2012 at 09:25:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Brown Moses Blog: Glenn Mulcaire And His Money-Laundering Charges
The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) statement on Tuesday on Operation Weeting charging decisions repays careful reading.  Beneath the headline-grabbing decisions to charge eight people, there are details which are quite telling - particularly regarding Glenn MULCAIRE.

All, with the exception of Glenn Mulcaire, will be charged with conspiring to intercept communications without lawful authority, from 3rd October 2000 to 9th August 2006.
Two things here are of note:-


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 26th, 2012 at 01:30:49 PM EST
Phone-hacking charges may deal new blow to The Sun - Crime - UK - The Independent

Britain's best-selling newspaper may become embroiled in the phone- hacking cases announced this week.

In a potential public relations setback for Rupert Murdoch's News International, one of the charges against his former protégé Rebekah Brooks covers the period when she was editing The Sun.

Mrs Brooks, a former editor of the News of the World, ex-news editor Greg Miskiw and Glenn Mulcaire, a private detective, are charged with plotting to hack the phone of the trade union leader Andy Gilchrist. The period covered by the charges is 3 December 2002 to 22 January 2003.

Mrs Brooks was promoted to the helm of The Sun in early 2003 and her first day as editor of the daily paper was 14 January that year. Six days later, The Sun published a story about the private life of Mr Gilchrist who, as general secretary of the Fire Brigades Union, was leading a national strike.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Jul 26th, 2012 at 04:02:53 PM EST


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