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European Salon de News, Discussion et Klatsch - 14 September

by In Wales Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:31:58 PM EST

 A Daily Review Of International Online Media 


Europeans on this date in history:

2007 - financial crisis, Northern Rock bank experiences the first bank run in the United Kingdom in 150 years.

More here and here

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by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:01:34 PM EST
Report blames captain, company for Costa Concordia | News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

Court-appointed experts have put the majority of the blame for the Costa Concordia cruise ship disaster on Captain Francesco Schettino and the Costa Crociere company, according to a new report.

The report, which was leaked to the Italian press and published in part by the daily newspaper La Repubblica on Thursday, said that Schettino the Italian company did not react promptly to the emergency. The confidential 270-page document was compiled by two captains and two engineers as part of the court investigation into the disaster.

According to La Repubblica, the report says that Costa Crociere should have immediately urged Schettino to evacuate the ship, possibly saving more lives in the process.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:13:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Belgian euthanasia law allows first death of a prisoner - FRANCE 24

AFP - A gravelly ill prisoner serving a long jail sentence has become the first inmate to die under Belgian euthanasia laws introduced 10 years ago, press reports said Thursday.

The man, who was not identified, died earlier this year after seeking permission several times when doctors decided his suffering could not be helped, the reports said.

They gave no details of his illness or the circumstances of his case.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:18:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dutch pro-European parties sweep vote - THE NETHERLANDS - FRANCE 24

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte won in a close race after voters in the Netherlands backed pro-European parties, dispelling fears that more extreme groups and eurosceptics were gaining ground in the eurozone country.

With nearly all of the votes counted, Rutte's centre-right Liberals have secured 41 seats in the 150-member lower house, giving them a slight edge over the centre-left Labour Party, which won 39 seats as of Thursday morning.

Speaking to supporters after Labour leader Diederik Samsom conceded defeat, Rutte said the vote was his party's "greatest victory in history".

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:22:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurointelligence Daily Briefing: Euro now over $1.30 as Fed goes for QE3
The euro overshoots in response to the Constitutional Court ruling and the news of the latest programme of quantitative easing in the US; euro/dollar exchange rate was at $1.3026 this morning; Mario Draghi tells Suddeutsche Zeitung that he is ready to go before the Bundestag to explain the OMT programme; he said the ECB would pull the plug on non-complying member states, as their governments would then take the full responsibility for a rise of interest rates to the private sector; the ECB lists four feedback loops that link high sovereign bond yields to high private sector interest rates; Wolfgang Janisch reports in Suddeutsche Zeitung that the Constitutional Court will ultimately not be able to take on the ECB; Greece is on the verge of lifting the retirement age to 67 years; the Greek government yesterday denied rumours that it would seek a third bailout programme; there was a public outcry against the Portuguese government's latest austerity measures; the Socialists said they would vote against the plan; their popularity is ahead of the government's for the first time since last year's elections; the Irish Fiscal Advisory Council says more austerity measures are needed for Ireland to meet its fiscal targets; Belgium, too, must find extra money to meet the deficit goals; Christobal Montoro claims that Spain's autonomous regions are on track to meet their fiscal targets; but says regional development help will not be available until October; Spanish government reforms capital gains tax; the Bank of Italy says Italy's productivity performance is appalling; Confidustria warns of a deep and long recession; also wants the government to apply for a rescue programme before the elections; Anatole Kaletsky, meanwhile, says he expects the crisis to return with a vengeance.


If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:44:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So much for the idea that the only way for the eurozone to get of its hole is through a depreciation of the exchange rate. In a world in which central banks have all hit the zero bound, it is very hard to drive down your own interest rate. The combination of some positive headline news, plus a new programme of bond purchases in the US has return us to a position where we were before the eurozone crisis turn ugly. This morning we registered an exchange rate of $1.3026 after yesterday's statement by the FOMC, which unlike the OMT, is a real bond purchasing programme, of an additional $40bn per month, plus rollover of existing purchases, while the OMT is conditional on rescue applications that may never be forthcoming. If you compare the policy stance across the two central banks, the eurozone has again the tighter stance. A question that will weigh on investors' mind to which extent to the OMT and the newly appreciated euro will make it harder for the eurozone periphery to turn around.
That's a wholly speculative flow from people who expect inflation from QE3... and don't expect the Euro to break up soon as a result of the OMT and the German Court decision.
ECB lists four transmission mechanisms of OMT

FAZ reports, disapprovingly, on the ECB's monthly report, which gives a solid defence of the OMT programme. The article feigns surprise by the fact that Mario Draghi does not seem to be impressed by the German constitutional court, which after all has no jurisdiction over the ECB. In the monthly report, the ECB outlined four transition mechanism that lead from high sovereign debt yields to high interest rates for companies and consumers. The first is the expectations channel - if a state is deemed to be heading into difficulty, expectations change about finance conditions for the private sector. The second is the direct competition between bank debt and state debt;
if the yields on sovereign debt rise, so must the yields on bank debt;
third, the secured inter-bank market uses government bonds as collateral;
and fourth is the balance sheet effect for banks through a reduction in the value of sovereign bonds.



If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:49:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Draghi says he will defend his programme in front of the Bundestag

Mario Draghi told Suddeutsche Zeitung an interview that he is ready to defend the Outright Monetary Transaction in the Bundestag, if invited. He said that would be a good way to explain the ECB's thinking. Draghi made clear that the goal of the programm is not to fund government, but to ensure that consumer and companies in the periphery have the same market interest rates as consumers and companies in the core of the eurozone. If countries failed to meet the conditions, the bond purchases would stop, he said, and the governments would be held responsible for taking away this benefit to consumers and companies. Draghi said the progamme already brought a return of confidence, as investment managers are return to the eurozone.

...

Anatole Kaletsky says expect the crisis to continue

He was also more optimistic than most of the other commentators, so please take note when former Times and now Reuters columnist Anatole Kaletsky writes that he expects the crisis to continue. He notes that the ECB's OMT programme and the ruling by the German constitutional court had created some optimism, but this will probably prove as temporary as all the previous outbreaks of euphoria. He argues that Draghi's promise to spend unlimited resources is logically undermined by the conditions the ECB has attached to its support. This is the mechanism as he sees it:

"The upshot is that every debtor country in Europe is now a sitting duck for currency speculators. Italy, Spain and other debtor countries can expect no support from the ECB until their economies deteriorate to the point where they will submit to ESM (European Stability Mechanism) austerity programs. And once debtor countries do agree to such programs, they will face speculation about the loss of ECB support whenever they appear to be missing their fiscal or reform targets. That in turn will force them either to abandon the euro or to tighten the fiscal screws even further and suffer more deflation."


If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:51:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why the current europhoria will likely fade | Anatole Kaletsky
From what he calls this tragic record of missed chances, Soros draws a conclusion similar to the one presented in my columns three months ago. Germany can continue as the economic leader of Europe only if it accepts the responsibilities of a "benign hegemon," much as the U.S. did when it forgave Germany's debts and launched the Marshall Plan after World War Two. If, on the other hand, Germany continues to identify debt with guilt (the German language, significantly, uses the same the word, schuld, for both concepts), it will continue blocking any resolution of the euro crisis that might involve the sharing of government debts across Europe. If, on top of this opposition to mutualizing debts, Germany retains its taboo against any monetary financing of government deficit, as practiced in the U.S. by the Federal Reserve, then Europe will be condemned to long-term depression and quite possibly a revival of national hatreds. In that case, it would be better for all concerned if Germany left the euro.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:55:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Germany is not going to leave the Euro, who are they kidding?
As I have written in the past, the Germans knew better than most that by signing up to the EMU they would have to change the way they pursued their mercantilist ambitions.

Previously, the Bundesbank had manipulated the Deutsch mark parity to ensure the German export sector remained very competitive. That is one of the reasons they became an export powerhouse. It is the same strategy that the Chinese are now following and being criticised for by the Europeans and others.

Once the Germans lost control of the exchange rate by signing up to the EMU they had to manipulate other "cost" variables to remain competitive. So the Germans were aggressive in implementing their so-called "Hartz package of welfare reforms". A few years ago we did a detailed study of the so-called Hartz reforms in the German labour market. One publicly available Working Paper is available describing some of that research.

(Bill Mitchell quotes in yesterday's Salon)

If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 04:02:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think Kaletsky's Soros-based narrative there is well-told. And neither he nor Soros estimates the chances of Germany leaving, they simply say "it would be better for all concerned if...".

Mitchell gives reasons why Germany's interest lies in an undervalued euro, and therefore why they would stay in.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 08:51:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Euro is not undervalued. It's undervalued with respect to where the DM would be, and overvalued relative to where everyone else would be, if there were no Euro.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 09:00:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's undervalued for purposes of German export to extra-EU, which is what I (pretty obviously in the context) meant.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:18:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Which allows rich American and Chinese businessmen to continue to buy their Porsches and Leicas.
by asdf on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 12:05:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And PIIGS tax evaders, too.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 06:29:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Draghi said the progamme already brought a return of confidence, as investment managers are return to the eurozone.

Hmm. Is this like venture capital who'll make money no matter what happens to the victimtarget company?
Maybe I'm being too cynical.

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 07:13:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Euro is saved, the European economy will be destroyed.

As JC Juncker said: The Euro will outlivebury us all.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 08:29:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Angebot des EZB-Präsidenten: Draghi entzweit den Bundestag | FTD.de offer the ECB President: Draghi divides the Bundestag | FTD.de
Die Unionsfraktion im Bundestag hat eine Rede von EZB-Chef Mario Draghi zu seiner Anti-Krisen-Strategie im Parlament abgelehnt - im Gegensatz zum Haushaltsausschuss. "Ein großer Auftritt im Plenum wäre nicht angezeigt, weil dieser leicht dahingehend missverstanden werden könnte, dass die Zentralbank in eine Abhängigkeit von der Politik rückt", sagte ein Fraktionssprecher in Berlin.The Union faction in the Bundestag has rejected the offer of a speech by ECB President Mario Draghi to explain his anti-crisis strategy in Parliament - in contrast to the Budget Committee. " a big performance in Parliament is not indicated, because this could easily be misunderstood that the central bank moves into dependence on politics," said a group spokesman in Berlin.
by Katrin on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 09:04:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Graham Watson MEP: Newsletter (14th September, 2012)
A provision in the Lisbon Treaty whereby national governments can put a brake on EU legislation has been used in the case of a draft Regulation on 'posted workers' published by the European Commission in March. Twelve national parliaments objected; on Tuesday the Commission withdrew the proposal, though they said they had done so because it had insufficient political support in the European Parliament or in the Council of Ministers (our two legislative chambers). The proposal was brought forward to try to resolve a difficult issue which arose four or five years ago when a Latvian company, Laval, won a contract for work in Sweden for which it planned to bring workers from Latvia (who are paid far less than Swedes, meaning Laval's bid was priceable lower than those of Swedish competitors). Swedish trade unions picketted the site, making the work impossible to carry out. A ruling against the trade unions in the European Court of Justice led the EU to intervene to try to establish a legal framework balancing economic freedoms and social rights, but by general consent the proposal, drawn up by Mario Monti, was too clever by half.

The main news of this week was a set of proposals from the European Commission on banking supervision which would give the European Central Bank supervisory powers equivalent to those of most national central banks but across the whole eurozone. Clearly the ECB would have to separate monetary policy from bank supervision, but - as agreed by eurozone heads of state and government in June - it would gain from next year the right to regulate banking within the eurozone, including powers over subsidiaries of non-eurozone banks which do business in the zone. The proposals put the European Parliament's nose out of joint because on matters to do with the ECB we are merely consulted by the national governments, whereas on the European Banking Authority (their previous idea) we had powers of co-decision. But we are heading for a prolonged run-in with the national governments in the Council of Ministers in any case, because we have withheld approval of their latest nominee to the ECB's board in protest against their repeated failure to find a single female candidate for the board.

The Commission also brought forward proposals for a regulation to give EU-wide political parties a clearer legal base. As President of the ELDR (EU-wide Liberal Democrat and Reform) party I welcomed this. To qualify, parties will have to meet criteria on internal democracy, transparency and commitment to democratic values. We do.



If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 05:09:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
See Commission to boost protection for posted workers (21/03/2012)
The proposed Enforcement Directive aims to improve the way the 1996 Directive on the posting of workers is applied in practice, without changing its provisions. In particular, the Enforcement Directive would:

  • set more ambitious standards to inform workers and companies about their rights and obligations;
  • establish clear rules for cooperation between national authorities in charge of posting;
  • provide elements to improve the implementation and monitoring of the notion of posting to avoid the multiplication of "letter-box" companies that use posting as a way to circumvent employment rules;
  • define the supervisory scope and responsibilities of relevant national authorities;
  • improve the enforcement of workers' rights, including the introduction of joint and several liability for the construction sector for the wages of posted workers as well as the handling of complaints.

The proposed Monti II Regulation addresses concerns that, in the single market, economic freedoms would prevail over the right to strike, stressing that there is no primacy between the right to take collective action and the freedom to provide services. It also sets out a new alert mechanism for industrial conflicts in cross-border situations with severe implications. In no way does the Regulation affect national legislation on the right to strike, nor would it create obstacles to the right to strike.


If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 05:26:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
France seen turning to renewables for 'ecological patriotism' | EurActiv

France's government begins a review of the world's most nuclear-dependent country's energy policy on Friday (14 September), strongly in support of its small and ailing renewables sector in an effort to boost local jobs and growth.

Ministers, NGOs, unions, industries, parliamentarians and consumers will converge for a two-day conference to agree on how to conduct a six-month national debate that will seek to reshape the way energy is produced, consumed and taxed in France.

Its new Socialist government is expected to announce immediate measures to help the crisis-hit renewable energy sector - which employs 100,000 people - as part of its battle to tackle soaring unemployment.

"There are businesses which are struggling and we can today save jobs," said a senior official at the energy ministry, who declined to be named. "Our concern is the notion of ecological patriotism, which is to ensure that support to the sector actually translates into jobs in France."

France's renewable energy lobby reckons the sector could generate 225,000 jobs by 2020 with investments totalling €80 billion, provided production targets are met.

In 2011, renewable energy revenues in France reached €10 billion ($12.89 billion), puny when compared to the $257 billion worldwide.



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 08:17:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
eurogreen:
France's renewable energy lobby reckons the sector could generate 225,000 jobs by 2020 with investments totalling €80 billion

that's a lot of bang for those buckaroos... LOL

if that's how much it costs to create an alt energy position, no wonder we have such high unemployment.

jumping jehozofat, what does it cost to create a cola miner's job, a shovel and a sandwich?

that's progress for ya...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 09:57:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
well that's something like €300 K of capital investment per job.

Big Wind doesn't create that many jobs, I guess, and sucks up most of the money [ducks and covers]

Small-scale energy projects in the rural sector ought to be much more labour-intensive, and France is already well behind in that branch. So if the emphasis is more on jobs than on energy, they should be the starting point.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:19:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I find this obsession with jobs deeply tiresome. If you have full employment as a policy goal you won't have to obsess about the number of jobs a single project provides. If your policy goal is suppression of the bargaining power of labour then it is easy to create unemployment.
by generic on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 11:12:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
big wind does not get a lot of subsidies, given that it's not far from price competitiveness, and costs almost zero to consumers thanks to the merit order effect (the support mechanisms end up transferring money from the traditional producers to the wind sector, which is exactly what policy should be doing, given the negative externalities of traditional producers)

Mot subsidies these days go to the solar sector, which is getting almost as big as wind, but still is more costly in terms of EUR/MWh produced (but again, policies are working as intended, by rapidly bringing that price down, thanks to strong demand allowing for investment and technical innovation).

All renewable energy is more labor-intensive than other forms of energy, as there is no input/value from stuff dug out of the ground - everything you spend on the wind industry goes to human activities, ultimately (plus a little bit of iron dug out o the ground)

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 04:56:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Iain Duncan Smith's £2bn benefit tourism estimate cut by 92%

The likely cost to UK taxpayers of allowing more foreigners to claim benefits is 92% lower than previously claimed, Iain Duncan Smith has said.

The work and pensions secretary is fighting EU moves to change Britain's habitual residence test which limits benefit claims by new arrivals.

He said last year the EU proposal could cost the UK more than £2bn a year.

He has now revised that to £155m, a figure he still describes as "enormous".



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 08:25:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If £155m is "enormous", then £2bn is "a whopper".

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 08:32:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
@MatinaStevis
World first. Ecofin finishes EARLY press conference about to start


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:26:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:01:52 PM EST
EU offers more financial aid to Egypt as president visits | News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

The European Union has pledged more economic aid to Egypt during a visit to Brussels by Mohammed Morsi. The Egyptian president's visit is seen as a bid to boost his democratic credentials.

European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso told a press conference that the additional financial aid would go towards supporting Egypt's planned transition to a fully fledged democracy.

"We can increase our program of financial cooperation with Egypt precisely to support, in general terms, these consolidated democracy efforts that President Morsi is so committed to," Barroso said.

"Egypt can count on the European Union," Barroso told the conference.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:09:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
EADS and BAE seek aerospace super merger | Business News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

The British arms manufacturer BAE Systems and European aircraft maker EADS have said they are in "advanced talks" to merge the two companies. The combo would be the biggest in the aerospace sector in more than a decade.

In a joint statement issued late Wednesday, Britain's BAE systems and Airbus owner EADS confirmed market speculation about a merger, saying the talks envisaged BAE owning 40 percent of the enlarged group, with EADS holding a 60 percent majority stake.

"The potential combination will create a world-class international aerospace, defense and security group with substantial centers of manufacturing and technology excellence in France, Germany, Spain, the UK and the USA," the statement read.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:11:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Spain shores up Bankia with non-cash injection | Business News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

Stricken Spanish lender Bankia has been thrown a multi-billion euro lifeline from the Spanish state after reporting a huge loss for the first half of 2012. The bank is at the heart of Spain's ongoing mortgage crises.

Bankia had received 4.5 billion euros ($5.7 billion) in the form of short-term government debt securities, Spain's state-backed Fund for Orderly Bank Restructuring (FROB) announced Thursday.

The move was needed "urgently," FROB said in a statement, and had come after Bankia reported a loss of 4.45 billion euros in the first half of 2012, which was a dramatic deterioration from a net profit of 205 million euros in 2011.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:11:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
German economic boom fails to reverse national debt | Business News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

Germany's sovereign debt remained above two trillion euros ($2.58 trillion) in 2011, despite additional revenues on the back of robust economic growth. And the national debt clock is bound to keep ticking away.

At the end of 2011, Germany had accumulated exactly 2,025,400,000,000 euros in sovereign debt, which was 0.7 percent more than in the previous year, according to data published by the German Federal Statistics Office, Destatis, Thursday.

In broken down figures, this amounted to 24,771 euros of debt for every German, Destatis said.

The debt of the national government was by far the highest, standing at 1.28 trillion euros, even though Berlin was able to reduce its debt by 0.6 percent last year.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:12:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bailout fund ruling meets with wide approval in Germany | News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

Nearly half of Germans support the ruling that approved the European Stability Mechanism. However, 78 percent doubt that the bailout fund will decisively advance efforts to resolve the nearly three-year euro crisis.

Forty-eight percent of those surveyed for German ZDF public television said they agree with the decision made Wednesday by the Constitutional Court to approve the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) bailout fund, compared to 39 percent who disagree. Thirteen percent expressed no opinion.

However, only 27 percent think the court took Germany's interests adequately into account, with 61 percent believing otherwise and 12 percent expressing no opinion.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:14:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Germany's president gives green light to euro rescue plan - Eurozone - FRANCE 24

Germany's head of state Thursday signed his country's agreement to the euro zone's new bailout fund but ratification will not be complete until the government meets the conditions set by the top court.

President Joachim Gauck's signature removed one of the final hurdles to ratification of the European Stability Mechanism (ESM), an important tool to stem the euro zone's three year debt crisis. Germany is the only country in the 17-nation currency bloc that has not ratified the ESM.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:21:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
More time possible if Greece delivers reforms: France - FRANCE 24

AFP - France's finance minister and the IMF both indicated Thursday that Greece could be given some breathing space implementing its austerity programme, provided it pushed through promised cuts.

France's Pierre Moscovici offered the possibility of some flexibility in comments to reporters after meeting Prime Minister Antonis Samaras and key ministers.

"There is a precondition... that the demanded efforts are carried out effectively," he said, adding that reform determination was "essential."

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:20:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
iPhone 5 clone maker to sue Apple over, um, iPhone 5 patent? | Technically Incorrect - CNET News
A report suggests that GooPhone, the Hong Kong-based company that created an Android iPhone 5 knock-off, has patented the design in China and will aggressively protect it.

Interesting development.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 04:38:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ooooh I want a Goooo!

Ultimate inverse-snobbery Geek Chic : get yourself a Goophone!

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 05:25:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More employment for lawyers. Which is the purpose of the intellectual property system.
by asdf on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 12:07:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Europeans on this date in history:

2007 - financial crisis, Northern Rock bank experiences the first bank run in the United Kingdom in 150 years.

More here and here

Jeez, it's been 5 years already?

I remember reading about this in the paper on the train, on the way to the Liberal Democrat Conference I was live-blogging:

The Euro was barely mentioned, but there was an intervention by someone from "The City" which I'll report here. He started out with the claim that London is subsidising the rest of the UK through its tax revenues which, as we know (ahem), are due mostly to London's position at the centre of the world's capital markets. He mentioned that the Euro Zone is taking over from the US as a global standard-setter in finance, and that this is driving international banks to establish offices in London, which (see above) is good for the UK economy. So the Euro is good for Britain because of that. But, of course, that doesn't mean that the UK should trade the Pound for the Euro. And here's where I really felt like slapping the guy to wake him up: he said there wouldn't be a case for the UK joining the Euro Zone unless and until there's some serious economic crisis which is not what "the current hiccup" is.
Bless his heart...

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 08:32:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:02:08 PM EST
Film protests spread in Arab world | News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

Uproar in response to an anti-Islam film is spreading, with US embassies in several Arab countries seeing protests. Meanwhile, a possible al Qaeda connection to Tuesday's deadly embassy violence is under investigation.

One person was killed by police in demonstrations at the US embassy in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, on Thursday. Several others were wounded when police used water cannons and live ammunition to deter the crowd of several hundred who had overrun the embassy.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:10:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Saudi Arabia condemns anti-Islam film, attacks on US - Yemen - FRANCE 24

Saudi Arabia condemned on Thursday a film Muslims consider blasphemous to Islam and
denounced the violent anti-American protests in some Middle East countries.

"Saudi Arabia has expressed... its condolences to the United States of America for the victims of violent actions in Libya that targeted the American consulate in Benghazi," state news agency SPA reported citing a senior official.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:19:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Film is the product of Karl Rove et al.  Stay tuned.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 08:35:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
See:
I'm thinking with the attack on US embassies spreading to Yemen, if the unrest keeps up it might turn into an election loser for Obama like the Iran hostage crisis was for Carter in 1980.


If you are not convinced, try it on someone who has not been entirely debauched by economics. — Piero Sraffa
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 01:45:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I've sometimes thought al-Qaeda might well fund some dumb yanks to do something like this

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:32:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But Al Qaeda is the creature of dumb yanks anyway...
by Katrin on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 04:39:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They prefer "freedom fighters".

-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 07:22:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]

what could possibly... (continued p.92)

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:13:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Does Fisk need a Fisking there?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:17:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
note the 'daily service to the USA' column a lower left.

nice touch!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Sep 15th, 2012 at 01:36:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
@BreakingNews
Protesters jump over wall into US Embassy in Sudan, Reuters witness says - @Reuters
@AP
German embassy in Sudan stormed by protesters, set on fire; authorities say employees safe: http://apne.ws/PArrwg  -SC
@PhilHanCNN
The american flag is burnt by protesters in front of embassy in London #protest pic.twitter.com/IfTIj735
@Reuters
PROTESTERS SET FIRE TO TREES, BREAK WINDOWS INSIDE U.S. EMBASSY COMPOUND IN TUNIS - REUTERS WITNESS


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:58:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Looks bad. Let's see if there are any injured or even dead, though. Not in the German embassy, it was closed and all staff gone (for the weekend, says the AA). Surely the Brits and US took some precautions, too?
by Katrin on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 11:29:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
UN atomic agency passes resolution against Iran | News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

The International Atomic Energy Agency passed a resolution that voiced "serious concern" regarding Iran's lack of cooperation with international demands to curb uranium enrichment and open up on its nuclear program.

Representatives from Russia and China joined a group of four Western nations led by the US in voting for the resolution at the IAEA's headquarters in Vienna on Thursday.

Cuba was the only country to vote against the measure, while Egypt, Ecuador and Tunisia - all members, along with Iran, of the Non-Aligned Movement - abstained.

The resolution calls on Iran to immediately agree to let UN inspectors into the country for checks on its nuclear facilities. Iran claims its nuclear program is for civilian purposes only, but there are concerns Iran could be trying to develop an atomic bomb.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:15:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
but there are concerns Iran could be trying to develop an atomic bomb.

if iran rolled out Gwatts of solar, would anyone make a fuss?

criticising them for doing what we are doing... i can't imagine that holds much water for the average iranian.

just sayin...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 07:54:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
they still need power when the sun goes down, and that needs to come from somewhere

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:35:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
not that I'm advocating nukes, but solar alone ain't the answer

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:36:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Please remember that no one, no one in the industry, thinks of anything but a widely varied mix of both generation and efficiency technologies.

So actually, solar is a huge part of the answer, in all it's forms including passive housing and developing world cookers. (this is a better version of "solar alone isn't the answer.")

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:06:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, passive housing/energy efficient building = negawatts. Not heard of those in a while, especially in the UK where the hostility towards the idea exceeds that towards windfarms

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:30:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's the 'I hate you and don't make me clean my room' argument against renewables.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:33:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Though not an accute problem (as per CH's comment), power can be stored. For example the way they are handling it in Spain:

Andasol Solar Power Station - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Andasol is the first parabolic trough power plant in Europe, and Andasol 1 went online in March 2009. Because of the high altitude (1,100 m) and the semi-arid climate, the site has exceptionally high annual direct insolation of 2,200 kWh/m² per year.[2] Each plant has a gross electricity output of 50 megawatts (MWe), producing around 180 gigawatt-hours (GW·h) per year (21 MW·yr per year). Each collector has a surface of 51 hectares (equal to 70 soccer fields); it occupies about 200 ha of land.[2]

Andasol has a thermal storage system which absorbs part of the heat produced in the solar field during the day. This heat is then stored in a molten salt mixture of 60% sodium nitrate and 40% potassium nitrate. A turbine produces electricity using this heat during the evening, or when the sky is overcast. This process almost doubles the number of operational hours at the solar thermal power plant per year.[3] A full thermal reservoir holds 1,010 MW·h of heat, enough to run the turbine for about 7.5 hours at full-load, in case it rains or after sunset. The heat reservoirs each consist of two tanks measuring 14 m in height and 36 m in diameter and containing molten salt. Andasol 1 is able to supply environmentally friendly solar electricity for up to 200,000 people.[3][4]



Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:36:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are better heat-storage media emerging. Glass made from plasma-torched asbestos seems particularly promising.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 04:29:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yippee, sustainable and appropriate plasma-torched asbestos.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 05:47:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A plasma torch is about the only  way, short of a thermonuclear explosion, to destroy asbestos and render it inert. And there's still plenty of it around that needs destroying. Might as well make use of the end product.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 06:03:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I simply meant the use of the words. Have no clue as to the technology, though you make it sound appealing.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 07:29:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nut wouldn't it be more efficient to use the sun to directly heat something using matt black panels and heat energy transfer. Turning light into electricity into heat is surely nowhere near as efficient.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 05:14:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Parabolic troughs are concentrators.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 05:46:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Its thermal solar power, not photovoltaics.

In thermal solar power photons are in general concentrated by mirrors (here parabolic troughs) onto a tube containing some appropriate medium for heat transfer (has not found what they use in Andasol, but probably some gas with desired properties) and then in the general case drives a turbine which generates electricty. But in this case the heat first goes to the molten salt and is then used to drive a turbine. Thus they get the option of time delay.

Looking for details I find this, Solar Millennium AG - Home:

Solar Millennium AG filed for insolvency on 14 December 2011. On 1 March 2012, insolvency proceedings were opened.

A victim of austerity perhaps? Clearly we can not afford nice things :(

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 07:37:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, turning light into electricity into heat is fine, because the inefficiency in each step is expressed as waste heat. The trick is to make the heat show up where you want it to...
by asdf on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 12:12:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That is so cool. Science FTW.

-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 07:31:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That may be so, but did you miss the real irony in melo's remark, the double standard of those considering nuclear power (a) safe, (b) not to be trusted in the hands of the wrong people ;-)

Where I come from, the safety of a technology is defined by what the bad guys can do with it. A chain's weakest link and all that.

by mustakissa on Sat Sep 15th, 2012 at 04:45:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tervetuloa, blackcat...

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Sep 15th, 2012 at 05:04:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Kiitos Sven!
by mustakissa on Sat Sep 15th, 2012 at 12:58:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Envoy arrives in Syria as fighting continues | News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

The UN-Arab League special envoy has arrived in Syria for talks with government and opposition representatives. Lakhdar Brahimi's visit coincides with fighting in Aleppo, where a helicopter strike killed at least 11.

Brahimi is scheduled to meet on Thursday with Syrian Foreign Minister Walid Muallem, Friday with members of the opposition, and with President Bashar Assad on Saturday.

Earlier this week, Brahimi told Arab League envoys in Cairo that he knew he faced "an extremely difficult task."

This is Brahimi's first trip to Syria in his new capacity, replacing Kofi Annan, who quit in August, frustrated that his efforts had done little to break the gridlock in the UN Security Council or end the civil war.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:15:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mexico captures suspected Gulf cartel kingpin - FRANCE 24

AFP - Mexican marines hauled the captured boss of the Gulf cartel before television cameras on Thursday, in a new blow to a drug smuggling gang already weakened by a brutal war for the US market.

The navy said one of the most wanted criminals, Jorge Eduardo Costilla Sanchez, alias "El Coss," was detained by the marines Wednesday evening in Tampico, a Gulf of Mexico coastal city in the northeastern state of Tamaulipas.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:20:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yawn, this starts to remind me of the no 2 AQ guys we're always catching...

make it stop, this media merry-go-round, it's soooo predictable, they must think we're dumber than a box of rox.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 07:59:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Egypt's ex-PM Ahmed Nazif jailed for corruption - Egypt - FRANCE 24

Former Egyptian Prime Minister Ahmed Nazif was jailed for three years on Thursday for the unlawful possession of property and for making illegal profits from a public-interest company.

Nazif, who held the job during deposed President Hosni Mubarak's last years in office, was also fined 9 million Egyptian pounds ($1.48 million).

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:23:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You mean they didn't before?

NYC to Require Consent for Controversial Religious Circumcision | WNYC

New York City's Board of Health voted 9-0 to require parental consent for a controversial ultra-Orthodox circumcision practice called metzitzah b'peh.

The new rule approved Thursday would require anyone performing the ritual to obtain written consent from a parent or guardian.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:45:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"The practice is known as oral suction, or in Hebrew, metzitzah b'peh: after removing the foreskin of the penis, the practitioner, or mohel, sucks the blood from the wound to clean it."
Ewww...
by Andhakari on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:31:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
NYC to Require Consent for Controversial Religious Circumcision - WNYC
The parents will have to sign a form acknowledging that the city Health Department advises against the practice because of risks of herpes and other infections.

I would say that is the core of the decision.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:40:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:02:35 PM EST
Calculating the true cost of electricity | Environment | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

Taking into account health and environmental damage, wind and solar power from new plants in Europe is actually cheaper than energy from coal and nuclear power plants, according to a new report.

Many people find it difficult to calculate the true cost of their electricity. Special duties, taxes and subsidies all add up to influence prices, not to mention the environmental and health costs that aren't included in the final calculations.

Researchers from Green Budget Germany (GBG) have taken a closer look at these extra costs in a recent study. Their work calculated, among other things, the environmental and health expenses related to available energy sources.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:16:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Haven't found the study yet, but Green Budget Germany (Green Budget Europe) is interesting. Here's just one:

Green Keynesianism

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 06:20:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's the German Wind Association (funded the study with Greenpeace) press release.


If these costs were added up and passed on to consumers, the surcharge for conventional energy would be 10.2 cents per kilowatt-hour, nearly 3 times higher than the current surcharge for renewable power, according to the study "Was Strom wirklich kostet" conducted by Green Budget Germany on behalf of power provider Greenpeace Energy and the German Wind Energy Association (BWE).


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 06:26:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:47:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Merci, afew.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:06:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What I notice in this report is that they don't really estimate the external costs of nuclear. What they write is the the estimates in the literature lie in the (enormous) range between 0.1 and 270 cents/kWh. And as they see no methodically valid way to pick a plausible value from this, they settle on conventionally using the value for the most dirty of the fossil fuels, lignite at 7.9 ct/kWh.

But, hey, this isn't methodologically valid either!

Using the most optimistic (and likely wrong) value, nuclear comes out at 5.0 ct/kWh, below wind and water -- but only slightly. Using the most pessimistic (and likely wrong too) value, nuclear goes off the scale.

A loose end in an otherwise interesting report. (What I would have done is take the median of literature values: this would be somewhat robust against both the unduly optimistic and unduly pessimistic results.)

by mustakissa on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:35:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Gas warning reignites UK government row over energy policy | Environment | guardian.co.uk

The row within the UK government over energy policy has been reignited ahead of the party conference season, with the former Tory environment secretary Lord Deben taking on George Osborne over the controversial role of gas.

The row is crucial because the outcome of the war within the cabinet over whether gas should be favoured above renewable energy, as the chancellor wants, will determine the shape of the UK's energy infrastructure for decades to come. Hundreds of billions of pounds in potential investment also hang on the result.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:27:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the tories will do whatever the corporates want and bugger the long term energy security of the county

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:40:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
New monkey species identified in Democratic Republic of Congo | Environment | The Guardian

A new species of monkey has been identified in Africa, only the second time such a discovery has been made on the continent in 28 years.

The identification of the monkey in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is significant, as identification of mammals new to science is rare.

Lesula (Cercopithecus lomamiensis) has a naked face and a mane of long blond hairs, and is described by the researchers who identified it as shy and quiet. It lives on the ground and in trees in a 6,500 square mile habitat of the lowland rainforests in the centre of the DRC between the middle Lomami (the inspiration for its name) and the upper Tshuapa Rivers. Its diet is mostly fruit and vegetation.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:30:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan aims to abandon nuclear power by 2030s | Reuters

(Reuters) - Japan's government said it intends to stop using nuclear power by the 2030s, marking a major shift from policy goals set before last year's Fukushima disaster that sought to increase the share of atomic energy to more than half of electricity supply.

Japan joins countries such as Germany and Switzerland in turning away from nuclear power after last year's earthquake unleashed a tsunami that swamped the Fukushima Daiichi plant, causing the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl in 1986. Japan was the third-biggest user of atomic energy before the disaster.

In abandoning atomic power, Japan aims to raise the share of renewable power to 30 percent of its energy mix but will remain a top importer of oil, coal and gas for the foreseeable future.

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda's unpopular government, which could face an election this year, had faced intense lobbying from Japan's main business federation to maintain atomic energy and also concerns from its major ally, the United States, which supplied it with nuclear technology in the 1950s.

The government announced the policy after a meeting of key ministers finalized the decision.

All but two of Japan's nuclear 50 reactors are idled for safety checks and the government plans to allow restarts of units taken off line after the disaster if they are deemed safe by a new atomic regulator.

Japan's growing anti-nuclear movement, which wants an immediate end to the use of atomic power, is certain to oppose any such proposal to secure electricity supplies by restarting reactors.

By applying a strict 40-year limit on the lifetime of reactors, most will be shut down by the 2030s.



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 05:25:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And in 1980 Sweden decided to abandon nuclear power from the year 2010.

In the meanwhile, the immidiate decision is to re-start the reactors.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 07:42:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:02:57 PM EST
NASA's 'Curiosity' readies to hit the Martian road | News | DW.DE | 13.09.2012

The US space agency has said its Mars rover appears to be working "flawlessly," with a lengthy period of instrument checks almost complete. The Curiosity rover will soon re-start its sluggish search for signs of life.

NASA's Mars rover, "Curiosity," will wrap up a lengthy self-testing phase on Thursday, freeing it up to continue exploring the surface of the Red Planet.

Mission manager Jennifer Tropser told reporters in a conference call on Wednesday evening that the plan, once the final checks were completed, was to "drive, drive, drive" until Curiosity discovers a rock suitable for analysis. She added that the instrument checks have delivered positive results.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:10:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Leaving a Morse Code message in the dirt.
by asdf on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 01:48:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Half of medicines sold in France are `useless' - FRANCE - HEALTH - FRANCE 24

Half of all medicines sold in France are either useless or dangerous, according to a book authored by two eminent French medical experts.

According to Philippe Even, former head of the Necker Hospital in Paris, and Bernard Debré, a doctor and member of parliament for the opposition UMP party, one in two medicines sold in pharmacies have absolutely no health benefit, while 5% are actively harmful.

Even told daily newspaper Le Parisien on Thursday that he and Debré had decided to conduct the study in the wake of the "Mediator" scandal. Mediator, a drug for controlling diabetes, is suspected of causing hundreds of deaths.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:17:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Un médicament sur deux inutile, des milliards pour la Sécu, selon un livre - Le Nouvel Observateur Book claims one drug out of two useless, at cost of billions to public health insurance - Le Nouvel Observateur
Interrogé par l'AFP, Bruno Toussaint, directeur de la revue Prescrire, une publication indépendante qui évalue les médicaments, a souligné qu'il y avait encore "beaucoup trop de médicaments sur le marché, beaucoup trop d'opacité sur les effets indésirables et trop peu d'exigences pour les nouveaux médicaments".Questioned by AFP, Bruno Toussaint, editor of the magazine Préscrire, an independent publication that evaluates drugs, said there were still "far too many drugs on the market, too much opacity on adverse effects, and too few requirements for new drugs."
Il a également estimé qu'une "grande partie des médicaments" faisaient "double, triple ou quadruple emploi par rapport à ce qu'on a déjà".He also said that "a large share of drugs" constituted "double, triple or quadruple use relative to what we already have."
"Que nous consommions trop de médicaments dans notre pays, c'est tout à fait évident", a réagi Sur Europe 1 Roselyne Bachelot, ancien ministre de la Santé."It is quite obvious that we consume too many drugs in our country" responded on Europe 1 Roselyne Bachelot, former Minister of Health.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:30:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Roselyne Bachelot, Minister of Health under Sarko, is a former pharmacist and tends to be Pharma-friendly (she was responsible for massive over-ordering of H1N1 vaccine a few years back), so this statement carries some weight.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:35:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe she resented getting marching orders from Washington. Surely it is not just Sweden that gets this kind of attention if doing anything that might hurt Big Pharmas profits?

Cable Viewer

PhRMA's drug pricing issue --------------------------
13. (U) PhRMA has also requested that Sweden be put on thQ Special 301 Watch List. The request is based on the GOS decision to de-regulate the pharmacy market in Sweden and the alleged plans to reduce prices of patented pharmaceuticals on the Swedish market with the aim to finance the redesign. The price cut is believed to be as high as 10 percent.

14. (U) According to the Swedish Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, the GOS does not plan to impose a general price cut on patented pharmaceuticals, but rather has the intention of maintaining a model for a value based pricing system. TLV, the Dental and Pharmaceutical Benefits Agency, a central government agency, has been assigned to suggest principles for pharmacy mark-up and to suggest how the profitability in the pharmacy market will be assessed and followed up. TLV will present its proposals to the GOS on April 1 this year.

15. (U) As of March 2 there is no decision, nor anything in writing, that confirms that the GOS is actually proposing a 10 percent general price cut on patented pharmaceuticals. Therefore the Embassy does not recommend that Sweden be put on the 2009 Special 301 Watch List as concerns the de-regulation of the Swedish pharmacies. However, should the GOS as a result of the April 1 TLV report reach a decision to impose a general 10 percent price cut on patented pharmaceuticals, the Embassy will engage in high-level advocacy with the GOS on the issue again.

The rest of that cable is also worth reading if one wants to know just how much the US lobbies decide copyright policies.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 04:28:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:27:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They have published other books together. Is this new one reporting something new, or are they on a crusade?

http://www.amazon.com/Avertissement-malades-médecins-élus-French/dp/2749100348/ref=sr_1_6? s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1347646595&sr=1-6

by asdf on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 02:19:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That previous book is 10 years old (2002) and was intended as a warning about the deteriorating situation of the French health system with systematic staff cuts and bean-counters inspired management. The irony is that B.Debré, son of Michel Debré - a "Historical Gaullist", is also a longtime UMP lawmaker (he was re-elected in Paris 15th district last June) and has supported the implementation of the very same policies he was denouncing 10 years ago...
by Bernard on Sat Sep 15th, 2012 at 07:37:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Richard Desmond threatens legal action over press self-regulation | The Drum

Richard Desmond, proprietor of the Daily Express and Daily Star, has thrown a cat amongst the pigeons by threatening to launch a legal challenge against industry moves to force him to join a new system of tougher self-regulation - according to The Times.

The system has been foisted on Desmond by rival publishers who have all agreed to sign up the regime - but Desmond remains a hold out even though it could see his titles barred from receiving industry wide services, such as news from the Press Association.

According to reports in The Times however Desmond believes that any attempt to strong arm him into such an arrangement would be illegal under competition law.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 08:27:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh well. We'll just have to slap regulation by the state on him.

Er... Won't we?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:29:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:03:19 PM EST
A lighter Salon today, apologies!
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:31:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC Sport - Sid Watkins: F1 safety and medical pioneer dies aged 84

Professor Sid Watkins, who was at the forefront of Formula 1 safety for more than 30 years, has died aged 84.

The neurosurgeon, who was a close friend of the late three-time champion Ayrton Senna, served as the sport's medical delegate from 1978 until 2004.

Watkins was instrumental in introducing many of the safety improvements in the sport during that period.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Sep 13th, 2012 at 04:51:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]

This is indeed die Mädels from Katzenjammer playing in the House of Parliament. The MP's get all the perks.

Thought you should know.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 08:41:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
(the one with Big Ben. a few days ago.)

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 01:16:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it's the top of the seventh inning in the European Baseball championships second round. Germany leads Sweden 6-3. In Rotterdam.

Full ET coverage sometime somewhere.

Live Ticker

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:03:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Whoops, 8-3 while typing.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 10:04:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't worry, neither country will be invited to the "World" Series any time soon. The world ends about 25 miles on the other side of the border with Canada.
by asdf on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 01:57:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Many of the SF Giants, with a good chance to win the NL West, are Venezuelans.

The German team has eight playing in the US minors, with two as top prospects.

But baseball will never take hold here (though it will grow well), because it rains too much.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Sep 14th, 2012 at 03:03:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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