Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

29 May 2013

by ceebs Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:16:59 PM EST

Your take on today's news media


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EUROPE


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:15:48 PM EST
French patient with nCoV virus dies | World news | guardian.co.uk

The first person to fall ill in France with the Sars-like coronavirus, a 65-year-old man who had been travelling in Dubai, has died in hospital from the illness, the health ministry said on Tuesday.

The health minister, Marisol Touraine, sent her condolences to the family of the man, whose death in Lille brings to 23 the number of people killed worldwide by the virus.

The man was diagnosed with the new virus strain, known as nCoV, on 8 May after being admitted to hospital on 23 April, shortly after his return from Dubai, with what seemed at first to be a severe stomach bug and breathing problems.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:32:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dance parties aim to boost Hungary birth rate - Features - Al Jazeera English
Peter Vamos is 33-years-old and looking for love. This Hungarian student has hopes of finding a wife and starting a large family.

"I have a dream... I want many children," he said, as his voice trails off, his eyes well up and his hands tremble. 

He apologises and explains it is an emotional topic. Sitting in a cafe in downtown Budapest, he explains how Hungary's struggling economy is making him question how many children he can have, although he admits he wants as many as possible.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:38:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NHS cuts: Blood clot patients being denied vital drugs putting lives at risk - Mirror Online
Getty

Patients with blood clots are being denied vital drugs because of Coalition NHS cuts, putting tens of ­thousands of lives at risk.

GPs have been banned from prescribing Novel Oral Anti-Coagulant pills, a health charity report has revealed.

That means sufferers have to make repeated visits to hospital for blood-thinning injections and take warfarin tablets which requires regular monitoring in clinics - sending care costs soaring.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:04:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ireland to become first EU country to ban cigarette branding - Telegraph

All trademarks, logos, colours and graphics will be removed from tobacco products sold in Ireland under the new rules, the health ministry said, after the proposal secured backing from the government.

Dr James Reilly, the country's health minister, said while many arguments will be made against the move, he is confident the legislation will be justified and supported purely by the fact that it will save lives.

"Smoking places an enormous burden of illness and mortality on our society, with over 5,200 people dying every year from tobacco-related diseases," he said.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:10:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
African refugees in Italy 'told to go to Germany' - Telegraph

The letter, sent to local immigration officials in Germany, stated that the refugees were told they would receive the money if they voluntarily left Italian reception centres that were due to be closed. Around 300 of these refugees are now sleeping rough in the St Pauli quarter of Hamburg.

"The money was slipped into their hands with the advice that they should travel to Germany," the government letter states, according to a report in the German newspaper Die Welt.

The men were migrant workers from sub-Saharan Africa who were forced out of Libya during the civil war because rebels associated them with the black Africans who served Colonel Gaddafi as mercenaries. The men were able to enter Germany because their Italian residence permits gave them freedom of movement within the Schengen area, however they are not allowed to settle or work in Germany without permits.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:10:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Juan Carlos's yacht gesture sparks ownership row - Telegraph

Last week the Royal Palace announced the 75-year-old monarch would renounce the use of his 21-million euros (£14 million) yacht 'Fortuna' for "austerity reasons" and would hand it over to Spain's National Heritage Department.

But on Monday the group of businessmen who chipped in to pay for the gift thirteen years ago demanded that it be returned to them and not the government if the King no longer wanted to use it.

In a letter to the administrators of Spain's national patrimony, the representatives of the group argued that the gift had been made with the stipulation that the yacht be used by the king and members of his family.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:12:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.
by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 01:35:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurointelligence: News May, 29th
European Commission wants to give Spain, France, and the Netherlands two more years for deficit reduction in exchange for concrete commitments on labour market reforms; a Commission official is quoted as saying: "There are limits to what can be achieved with austerity"; concrete proposals include the stripping or discounting of national co-shares of joint EU project funding from the deficit calculations, and may be extended to structural reform policies; Germany is extremely concerned by the proposals to recalculate the nature of a deficit; Mariano Rajoy has also weighed into the debate with a comment that fiscal subsidies for the hiring of unemployed youth should not count against deficit targets; He said that "reality imposes" slower fiscal consolidation; a former CEO of construction firm FCC admits to the 'Bárcenas papers' judge that subsidiaries were used to channel donations to the PP in 2011; newly released data show new mortgage volumes going down and interest going up in Spain despite decreasing Euribor rates; a recent Bank of Spain requirement to classify refinancings as substandard loans is leading banks to favour debt-equity swaps in debtor bankruptcies; Italian Audit Court warns over austerity and says Italy GDP contracted €230bn in 2009-2013; Fabrizio Saccomanni said the EU Excessive Deficit Procedure opened against Italy in 2009 could end today; says the proposed 1% VAT increase is unavoidable; Beppe Grillo blasts Italians who did not vote for M5S in local elections; they may be forced to rethink their vote in the autumn, after a revamp of crisis; Le Monde features three anti-EU parties in France and how they prepare to score high in the European elections 2014; In Portugal, a book about euro exit hits the bestseller lists and ignites a public debate about whether the real problem is not austerity but eurozone membership after all; Portuguese banks have improved the liquidity and capital levels but still face a rise in non-performing loans; Portugal's Bank lending fell 6.3% on the year through March, while deposits are on the rise; Finnish government was prompted to release remaining confidential documents on Greek `collateral' deal, revealing that it was more of a derivative transaction; PASOK and Democratic Left decided to submit their own anti-racism bill to parliament despite objections of New Democracy; Local banks in Greece got about €15bn in liquidity from foreign lenders on the interbank market in recent months; expect to get more liquidity using the EFSF bonds for repos; The OECD better life index suggests that Greeks are working harder but are paid less than the average of OECD countries; Spiegel Online on how the German PR stunt on youth unemployment works; Avinash Persaud says the critics of the financial transactions tax cannot have it both ways: they cannot claim that the tax will be avoided by shifting business off-shore, and that it is going to cripple the industry; also makes the point that the FTT seeks to redress a damaging imbalance in the tax of finance and the real economy, and may reign in economically damaging activity such as high-frequency trading; Andrew Balls regards it as likely that governments will eliminate their debt overhang by forcing haircuts on investors as economic growth remains stagnant; Says Pimco has reduce exposure to eurozone, while simultaneously increasing exposure to emerging markets; Paul Krugman, meanwhile, debunks the argument that a German fiscal expansion would be pro-cyclical for Germany: says this is precisely the point.


In the long run, we're all misquoted — not Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 04:29:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurointelligence: How real is the end-of-austerity U-turn? (May 29, 2013)
After the report on the anti-austerity U-turn by the European Commission, which we carried yesterday, more details emerged in today's media coverage - which seems to suggest that the impact is perhaps not quite as big as some people may think.

The FT has the story that France, Spain and the Netherlands will all be given more time to fulfil the budget targets. We love the logic-defying quoted by Commission economist Maarten Verway, who is quoted as saying: "There are limits to what can be achieved with austerity." (which translates as: we misjudged the economic and political impact of austerity). They are selling their retreat by emphasising a link to structural reforms, especially in labour markets, which countries now have to undertake as a pre-condition for the relaxation in austerity. The cautiously worded FT article said the proposals seemed to go a little further than what President Francois Hollande seems to find acceptable for France.

Writing in the Wall Street Journal Matina Stevis and Gabriele Steinhauser have an article that goes into some of the mechanics of the how the retreat from austerity works in legal and administrative terms. Beyond the ability to give countries more time to achieve the 3% nominal deficit target, the European Commission also wants to eliminate or discount certain categories of short-term spending when calculating a country's deficit if these can boost growth in the medium-term. Naturally the Commission consider EU structural programmes as qualifying, and thus may exempt the national co-share of these programmes from the calculations. The article says while this had been planned by Olli Rehn and his team at DG Ecfin, Jose Manuel Barroso apparently wanted to go further.

However, any such plans cannot apply for countries with deficits over 3% - i.e. not Spain and Portugal. "It will only apply to countries that risk running too high a deficit in the near future and whose overall spending and debt-reduction goals remain attainable." (We would find it hard to think of any country that might fit into that category, except perhaps Italy.)

The article also contains a dry comment from Martin Kotthaus, Wolfgang Schauble's spokesman. "Confidence [in public spending] is very quickly lost, but it's very difficult to gain... We trust that the commission will have in mind this simple truth in all its actions and all its communication."

At a forum in Paris organised by the Berggruen Institute on Governance, Spanish PM Mariano Rajoy proposed that subsidies to firms aimed at reducing youth unemployment do not count towards the deficit limit, El País reports. The deficit resulting from last year's banking rescue also was not taking into account for Spain's excessive deficit procedure. Rajoy also proposed that the European Investment Bank raise its subscribed capital from €10bn to €30bn. The Spanish PM said that "logic imposes a moderation of the pace of fiscal consolidation to adapt it to reality", as "Europe is the only region in the world not growing after 6 quarter in recession, and it's natural for people to wonder what we're doing wrong".

After Rajoy claimed last September that "reality prevented" him from keeping to his electoral promises, and last December that pension cuts were "imposed by reality", now apparently "reality" is "imposing" slower fiscal consolidation. Who knows what "reality" has in store for Rajoy next year. Reality is also what seems to have intruded in the Commission's now heavily leaked policy U-turn, though it is our sense that the additional overall impact of these measures is below macroeconomic relevance, similar to the much trumpeted initiatives on youth unemployment.



In the long run, we're all misquoted — not Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 04:33:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So, is this the Hollande fix?

Austerity lite? Continue to pay lip service to the concept that austerity is our only salvation, while redefining it with creative accounting in order to enable Keynesian stimulus?

Careful -- whether or not the details amount to a hill of beans, it seems that it will be impossible to cry victory, or even claim the high moral ground, otherwise the German polity will go even more anal retentive and throw their toys out of the pram.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 04:41:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Facebook
Beppe Grillo

2008 Roma: PD voti 521.880
2013 Roma: PD voti 267.605 (-254.275 voti) = - 48%
2008 Roma: PDL voti 559.559
2013 Roma: PDL voti 195.749 (-363.810 voti) = - 65%
2008 Roma: M5S voti 40.473
2013 Roma: M5S voti 130.635 (+90.162 voti) = + 222%



'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 04:41:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So, where did all the other half a million votes go?

In the long run, we're all misquoted — not Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 05:26:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Turnout was very low.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 05:58:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
stayed home watching a different reality show, or voted for bizzarro splinter factions of numerical insignificance i guess...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 08:40:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 ECONOMY & FINANCE 


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:16:08 PM EST
Digital currency firm Liberty Reserve accused of $6bn money-laundering | Business | guardian.co.uk

Federal prosecutors in New York have accused a Costa Rica-based company and its founder of running a $6bn money-laundering scheme that became a "bank of choice for the criminal underworld".

Digital currency company Liberty Reserve was involved in one of the biggest money-laundering operations ever uncovered, according to an indictment on Tuesday by Preet Bharara, the US attorney for the southern district of New York.

Liberty was the "financial hub of the cyber-crime world", according to the indictment. It facilitated "a broad range of online criminal activity, including credit card fraud, identity theft, investment fraud, computer hacking, child pornography, and narcotics trafficking".



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:30:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Only $6b ??? Ha !! The British government excuses tax bills like that for corporations for breakfast.

And then marches them to the UK Commonwealth offshore tax haven of their choice where they may allow their money to go and relax in the sun.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 03:15:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Not if they are trying to create an alternative to the pound....
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 03:39:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurozone fears for Slovenia as bad debt brings economy to a standstill | World news | Guardian Weekly

Janez Novak is baffled: all this talk about a crisis but nothing seems to be wrong. Obviously business "isn't that bright", he says. Then there are the interest rates the banks have just raised. "I didn't like that much, but we'll get used to it," he adds with a wry grin. "After all, everyone's affected, even France and Spain."

Novak heads RLS, which manufactures motion sensors exported to the rest of Europe and the US. He reckons plans for an international bailout are something the media have cooked up.

But according to Alenka Bratusek, the recently appointed centre-left prime minister, urgent measures are required. In early May she presented a package in an effort to stave off intervention by the dreaded troika: the European commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:31:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Right now the ECB seems to be behaving like a mafia boss demanding protection money

"Better introduce austerity or something bad may happen to your nice economy."

So they introduce austerity and something bad happens. then it's..."better cut more stuff. Or things will get really baaaad"

Etc etc until Merkel gets re-elected

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 03:19:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Companies cut bonuses in response to 'Shareholder Spring' - Telegraph

Nearly a third of FTSE 100 companies have chosen not to raise basic salaries for directors this year, a survey by FIT Remuneration Consultants has found, while the average pay increase was around 2.5pc - roughly in line with inflation.

Basic salaries for FTSE chief executives average around £870,000 and bonuses have also decreased, with executives receiving on average 69pc of their maximum possible award, down from 77pc a year ago.

"Our survey shows that remuneration committees are taking notice of the ever-increasing focus on executive pay, as manifested in last year's Shareholders' Spring," said Rob Burdett, a partner at FIT.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:08:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Quiet Collapse of the Italian Economy | Euro Crisis in the Press

The Italian state has so far managed to defend its financial position by means of increased taxation, limited spending cuts and more borrowing. As illustrated above, the borrowing scheme has been engineered with the help of the ECB and the banking sector. Taxation has now reached unprecedented levels, and it is asphyxiating the economy together with the credit crunch. Spending cuts have been implemented to a certain extent, but like taxes they have a depressing effect on the economy, not to mention their unviability in a largely clientelistic, if not openly kleptocratic system.

Under pressure from the European Union, Italy has committed to a rigorous budget and it has even introduced a balanced-budget amendment in its constitution. Absurdly, the Italian state runs a surplus when public debt interest payments are excluded, but this only appears to be because, purely and simply, the state often "forgets" to pay its suppliers (the outstanding debt to private companies is in the €90-€130 billion range, depending on the criteria for calculation).

Now, it is not difficult to imagine that, in a few months, despite the new taxes, the sheer collapse of entire sectors of the economy will cause a rapid contraction of tax revenues. The Italian state cannot possibly accumulate even more debt at a faster pace (at least for Italy, the austerity debate makes little sense). Italy will simply run out of options, and it will require additional measures from the EU. Essentially, some sort of bailout. But because of the sheer size of the economy  and the public debt, this is simply impossible. In the absence of any political consensus around a radically different monetary policy of the ECB, i.e. unlimited QE, which will probably never materialise, and which will clearly not solve any of the country's structural problems, the only realistic scenario will be that of a debt restructuring or renegotiation, as suggested by Nouriel Roubini in a precise analysis published more than 18 months ago. The collapse of the Italian state finances is rapidly approaching. It will have an enormous impact on the Eurozone and the European Union.

italy's economy is the fulcrum on which the viability of the euro rocks.

when italy goes, so does the chance of a common currency, unless some rocks are removed from some bundesbankster cranial vaults, or is it ingots from the alimentary canal, i get so corn-fused.

and if the euro crashes, whither the global economy?

see why grillismo is more than just a ranting clown show yet?

 

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 08:31:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 WORLD 


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:16:31 PM EST
BBC News - Russian arms 'to deter foreign intervention in Syria'

Russia says it will go ahead with deliveries of S-300 anti-aircraft missiles to Syria, and that the arms will help deter foreign intervention.

Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said the missiles were a "stabilising factor" that could dissuade "some hotheads" from entering the conflict.

Russia also criticised an EU decision not to renew an arms embargo on Syria.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:21:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Russia to send air-defence system to Syria - Middle East - Al Jazeera English

Russia will not cancel plans to deliver an air-defence system to Syria despite Western opposition in order to help deter foreign intervention in the two-year-old conflict, according to the country's deputy foreign minister.

Speaking in Moscow on Tuesday, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov also accused the EU of "throwing fuel on the fire" by letting its own arms embargo on Syria expire.

"We think this delivery is a stabilising factor and that such steps in many ways restrain some hotheads from exploring scenarios in which this conflict could be given an international character with participation of outside forces," Ryabkov said.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:36:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Those anti-aircraft missiles wouldn't be a deterrent specifically against Israel, would they ?

Why yes, I think they are.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 03:20:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Doesn't the US or EU want a no-fly zone over Syria? This is one way to enforce it....
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 03:38:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Syrian rebels divided in fight against Assad - Middle East - Al Jazeera English

For the first time, Al Jazeera has gained access to a frontline view of the stand-off outside al-Raqqa city in northern Syria.

Opposition snipers from the Ahrar al-Sham Brigade, a group that has a reputation for some of the fiercest combat fighters in Syria's war, are in the forefront of the fight against President Bashar al-Assad's government.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:37:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
18 people killed, 44 wounded in attacks in Iraq - Xinhua | English.news.cn

Up to 18 people were killed and 44 wounded in attacks, including a suicide tanker truck bombing, in central and northern Iraq on Tuesday, the police said.

In northern Iraq, Iraqi security forces clashed with gunmen during a security operation in the western part of the city of Mosul, some 400 km north of the Iraqi capital of Baghdad, a local police source told Xinhua on condition of anonymity.

The clashes resulted in the killing of three security members and four gunmen, the source said, adding that the troops arrested some 15 suspected militants in the area.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:43:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Chinese hackers 'steal' plans for Australian spy HQ - AUSTRALIA - FRANCE 24

Chinese hackers have stolen the blueprints of a new multi-million-dollar Australian spy headquarters as part of a growing wave of cyber attacks against business and military targets in the close U.S. ally, a Australian news report said.

The hackers also stole confidential information from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, which houses the overseas spy agency the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, Australia's ABC Television said late on Monday.

The ABC report, which did not name sources, said Chinese hackers had targeted Australia-based companies more aggressively than previously thought, including steel-manufacturer Bluescope Steel, and military and civilian communications manufacturer Codan Ltd.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 02:55:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Train derailment in Rosedale causes building collapses and road closures | Citypaper Blogs

The Baltimore County Police and Fire Department Twitter feeds are reporting that "Several buildings collapsed at site of train derailment," at 7500 block of Lake Drive in Rosedale.

As emergency responders try to reach the location and nearby buildings are evacuated, there are reports that Route 40 is closed in both directions and that I-95 will be closed shortly.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:06:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I can't beat The Pan-American Post for rounding up the important news, so please go THERE.

"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne
by maracatu on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 08:04:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
'You never answer your phone, you don't file expenses and you miss important meetings': International terrorist Moktar Belmoktar receives dressing down from al-Qa'ida leadership in newly discovered letter - Middle East - World - The Independent

A fascinating insight into the inner workings of al-Qa'ida has been provided via a letter from the terror network's central command, berating international terrorist Moktar Belmoktar for not answering his phone, failing to file expenses and missing important meetings.

In the letter - discovered by Associated Press in a Timbuktu building once occupied by Belmoktar's troops and formally authenticated by three terror experts - senior members of al-Qa'ida issue what amounts to a formal written warning for the Algerian terrorist.



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 10:32:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Is this a joke?

In the long run, we're all misquoted — not Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 10:40:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm afraid I find it pretty funny, but it's apparently been authenticated.

This was sent shortly before he declared independence and launched the Algerian operation.

Quoting from the English translation of the full 10-page reprimand :

Management of the kidnapping file. Clearly, kidnappings are at the top of military action in the Sahara region. The region has seen many of them, and they had important political, financial and media ramifications on the political and military front, as well as on the local, regional and international levels. We don't know of a single case that the Emirate did not oversee. In fact, it dedicated all its time to following the developments of these cases on multiple fronts.
We cite just one of these kidnappings: the kidnapping of the Canadians that the Masked Brigade carried out. The organization paid particular attention to this abduction because of the nature of the Canadian captives _ one of them was the personal representative of the U.N. secretary general. We strove to give this case an international dimension. We tried to coordinate with the leadership in Khorasan [Afghanistan/Pakistan]. But unfortunately, we met the obstacle of Khaled [Belmoktar]. Rather than walking with us in the plan we outlined, he managed the case however he liked, despite our repeated insistence that the case should be under the administration of the organization.
He chose to step outside the organization and reach an agreement in his own way, he did not follow the  organization's instructions, and if not for God Almighty's leniency and the reasonableness of the brother emirs, the problem would have escalated.
Here we must ask, who handled this important abduction poorly? Was it the organization's Emirate, who tried to pressure the crusader alliance to lighten its footprint on our brothers in Afghanistan and, among other goals, free imprisoned brothers and obtain a ransom? (and the value of the hostages would have allowed for obtaining most of these goals)
Does the inadequacy come from consultation and coordination, which we were insistent on _ or does it come from unilateral behavior, along the lines of our brother Abu Abbas, which produced a blatant inadequacy: trading the weightiest case (Canadian diplomats!!) for the most meager price (700,000 euros)!!


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 10:53:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There's a business opportunity for our in-house management consultants: Cyrille and Metatone...

In the long run, we're all misquoted — not Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 11:04:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
LIVING OFF THE PLANET
Environment, Energy, Agriculture, Food


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:17:02 PM EST
Two die after h7n9 bird flu virus develops drug resistance | World news | guardian.co.uk

Scientists say they have found the first cases of the new bird flu virus proving resistant to treatment with Tamiflu or similar drugs. The virus has so far killed 36 people and been confirmed in 95 others in China.

The analysis of the course of the H7N9 bird flu virus and use of antivirals in 14 patients, reported in the Lancet medical journal, found that three severely ill people did not respond to the group of medicines that are the standard weapon against threatened flu pandemics. Two died and the third still needed specialist equipment to oxygenate their blood at the time the research paper was submitted.

The authors, from Shanghai and Hong Kong, said that in these cases genetic testing showed a mutation. In one patient, it seemed to have occured after the infection took hold, probably as a result of the treatment.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:32:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
97% global warming consensus meets resistance from scientific denialism | Dana Nuccitelli | Environment | guardian.co.uk

The Skeptical Science survey finding 97% expert consensus on human-caused global warming has drawn an incredible amount of media attention. Hundreds of media stories documented our survey and results. Lead author John Cook and I participated in a number of interviews to discuss the paper, including on Al Jazeera, CNN, and ABC. President Obama even Tweeted about our results to his 31 million followers.

The story has been so popular mainly because our results present a simple but critical message. There is a wide gap between the public awareness and the reality of the expert consensus on human-caused global warming.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:34:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The reality escaping activist authors like Nuccitelli is that it doesn't matter one bit how much expert consensus exists on whether humans are causing climate change. The study doesn't tell us anything interesting and it is off-point in swaying perceptions of the larger public.
by Bjinse on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 05:30:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
From your second link:

A New Climate Survey Tells Us What? : Collide-a-Scape

Sometimes I think the climate debate remains stalled because those who are most concerned refuse to ask the pertinent questions. Instead, they keep refighting old battles that are no longer relevant to a constructive discourse.

And here is where I disagree. The debate in the US reamins stalled because the denialist side is still managing to keep it at hand one of the Denialists Deck of Cards:

The Denialists' Deck of Cards - denialism blog

First Hand: "No Problem"

Doubt is our product since it is the best means of competing with the "body of fact" that exists in the mind of the general public. It is also the means of establishing a controversy...with the general public the consensus is that cigarettes are in some way harmful to the health. If we are successful in establishing a controversy at the public level, then there is an opportunity to put across the real facts about smoking and health. -A 1969 Tobacco Industry strategy document[2]

Public policy debates on consumer protection and the environment almost always start with the "no problem" theme.  The argument emphasizes that whatever consumer reform being debated is unnecessary.[3]  This is because there is no problem.

"No problem" is the chorus of a denalist argument.  The skilled denalist, even after engaging in a debate for an extended period of time, will never concede that a problem exists.

Unless you can convince people that there is a problem, you can't win them for a solution.

Quark Soup by David Appell: About the SkS Study That Finds a 97% Consensus

I'm not very keen on these kinds of numbers -- they are made for lazy journalists who don't want to examine the complexity of the science, reporters who just want a number that quickly and easily supports their position.

And it appears to have worked as intended. Lazy journalists everywhere has repeated that science is stating that the problem exists.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 07:48:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
'Refighting old battles that are no longer relevant' vs the hand of 'no problem' by denialists is not mutually exclusive in my perspective.

I am not convinced that the argument of touting a 97% scientist consensus leads to a way out. After all, it's not like that strategy hasn't been done before. Didn't work then, why would it work this time?

by Bjinse on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 12:12:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think there exists any killer argument. It is a propaganda war. Sides keep repeating their story until one sides core group feels uncomfortable enough to change the message, then the battleground shifts.

This was effective in that it got lots of attention. But one well-fired shot does not win a war.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 04:45:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The study doesn't tell us anything interesting (we already know about the scientific consensus). The study doesn't examine any of the interesting, complicated questions that would fly completely over the general public's head.

The study sticks to its T-shirt-worthy finding,

which is what makes it useful.

Because the collection of sociopaths and paid shills who attempt to preserve the illusion that there is no scientific consensus will not become any less passionate, but their audience will shrink : because most people, even conservatives, don't like to associate with a tiny minority of people on the lunatic fringe. "Climate scepticism" will become increasingly uncool. Congressmen will increasingly find it difficult to hide behind the idea that there is no consensus. Etc.

The fact that the soft underbelly of public opinion doesn't see climate change as relevant to them personally, will slowly change in function of things like the rotten European spring, tornadoes, droughts, and other unattributable weather events. And I bet you'll be pissed off about that too :)

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 08:03:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are additional issues to consider. Plenty of people probably don't find it 'cool' at all that there is a consensus under 'climate experts': they're an elitist, government-funded bunch of white coats, half of them frauds anyway, who cares what they think?

Additionally, after hurricane Katrina, there has been a near decade of pretty loud claims of increasing 'unnatural weather' by these 'climate experts' - with only little effect on the general public perception in the States, as the numbers of the polls show. I don't find that surprising at all, as plenty of those claims had no merit (including claims on droughts and tornadoes).

That ties in with the immediate issue raised by Kloor:

Over many years of research, we have consistently found that, on average, Americans view climate change as a threat distant in space and time-a risk that will affect far away places, other species, or future generations more than people here and now.

That. Is. The. Stumbling. Block.

How many decades are you willing to wait before people are noticeably affected?

by Bjinse on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 12:44:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
who cares what they think?

Yes, this is the "maverick" profile, who are comfortable being on the lunatic fringe, capable of believing in government conspiracies about UFOs, etc. The money is starting to dry up for these people. That's progress.

Given that a majority (or very large plurality) of Americans believe in Rapture, I'm not willing to wait at all for them to change their minds about climate science. But a slow shift in public opinion is helpful in enabling more rational public policy.

And as for your assertions that "plenty of those claims had no merit" : let's take an example. I'm intimately convinced that there is a strong connection between global warming and the current rotten European spring. I'm pretty sure that you will assert that any such claim "has no merit" (on the basis that a link may be disproved some day, decades from now?) So my question is : if it's forbidden to talk about such things, how long are you prepared to wait?

Insofar as you are sceptical about the usefulness of this 97% story, I'm curious as to what you think would be useful.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 04:01:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm pretty sure that you will assert that any such claim "has no merit" (on the basis that a link may be disproved some day, decades from now?)

Almost agreed: a correlation showing a significant deviation from the mean first needs to established. AFAIK, it hasn't.

Talking about hunches or convictions ain't 'forbidden', however, I've learned, personally and professionally, that perceiving them as truth is a sure way to get egg-faced down the road. Hence I need to strictly adhere to established fact - which requires the necessary show of evidence. Except for rendering us entertainment value, one cold European spring and a continent full of grumbles doesn't tell us anything.

So, to answer your question, I'll wait on proper science findings, as it is the best tool available, even when I'm intimately aware the system is increasingly showing some considerable and worrying flaws.

As to what I think would be useful instead, I need some proper time to think that through. I do feel that activist scientists have done more harm than good on this topic, and I am supportive of Roger Pielke Jr.'s reasoning that science is a poor tool to resolve political disputes - and solutions for working towards a decarbonised economy are ultimately political. I already am overburdened by working my way through the science, so haven't thoroughly explored the roads towards effective political solutions - though I feel (hunch!) pretty bleak about them at this point. Both democratic and technocratic approaches work under glacial velocities and have not shown much promise to reach results, as far as I can see. Absent effective politics, we're left with economics and all the messiness that comes with that.

by Bjinse on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 08:25:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
science is a poor tool to resolve political disputes - and solutions for working towards a decarbonised economy are ultimately political.

I confess I'm scratching my head over this idea. You've made it abundantly clear that you have nothing but contempt for scientists who become political activists. In the current discussion, you don't go as far as condemning the authors of the study, but attempt to ridicule it as useless (despite evidence to the contrary).

Insofar as you actually care about climate change, I imagined that you had some alternative agenda. I'm disappointed.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 08:56:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Small correction - I have full admiration for scientists who become political activists, eg James Hansen. I do have strong reservations for politically engaged scientists attempting political traction under the guise of science, and I think their track records speak for themselves.

On climate change, I currently attempt the role of a Socratic observer of the science, and I'm ill suited for a comprehensive analysis into the political realm or solutions. That would simply be overreach and out of place - for this time being. Keep on asking.

by Bjinse on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 10:46:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
science is a poor tool to resolve political disputes

The problem with that argument is that politics is even worse at resolving political disputes.

And no, climate change is empirical, not political. The solutions should also be empirical not political - for the rather obvious reason that empirical solutions are grounded in the real world, while political 'solutions' are about rhetoric, emotion, and denying physical consequences to the maximum possible extent.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 09:21:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nowhere I argued that climate change is not empirical. What I did argue is that solutions of 'working towards a decarbonised economy are ultimately political'.

The problem with that argument is that politics is even worse at resolving political disputes.

Why else do you think my outlook has turned bleak?

I'd be interested to hear about examples of previous political disputes which were solved by empirical solutions.

by Bjinse on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 11:00:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What is interesting is that most of that 3% opposing a consensus on the anthropogenic contribution to climate change are funded by vested interests whose business model would be adversely affected by the consolidation of public opinion around such a consensus and the resulting policy moves that could result therefrom.  

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 09:51:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Energy-from-waste facilities get green light across UK | Environment | guardian.co.uk

In south London, Viridor has finally got the go-ahead to build an energy recovery facility next to its landfill site in Beddington.

The incinerator will provide South London Waste Partnership and businesses with a cost-effective alternative to landfill and also bring forward the completion and restoration of the existing landfill into green spaces and wildlife habitats.

Viridor's head of development projects Robert Ryan said the ERF was "the right solution for South London's waste challenge and is one that will deliver real economic, social and environmental benefits".



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:34:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ceebs:
environmental benefits

so they figgered out how to scrub the dioxin out of the smoke?

greenius! tell italy stat.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 08:36:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This plant seems to be using old-fashioned low-temp incinerators -- yeah there is less dioxin than the older models, but there will be dioxin

It's time to deploy pyrolysis-based incinerators -- virtually no pollution because of the very high temperatures, possibility of generating syngas, etc.

Just coming on stream in the next couple of years.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 09:19:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Prince Charles attacks food production methods at German symposium | UK news | The Guardian

The Prince of Wales launched a wide-ranging attack on current food production methods he said have led to the horsemeat scandals and declining public health, particularly in the US.

In a speech at a conference in Germany on regional food security, he called for the creation of a more local model of food production and distribution.

Addressing the Langenburg Forum at Langenburg Castle in the state of Baden-Württemberg, he said there was not sufficient resilience in the system.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:35:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is the Prince of Wales who, when asked by his tenant farmers if he would support them to move to organic production, refused cos it would hit his profit margins.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 03:25:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Helen:
refused cos it would hit his profit margins.

linky?

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 08:37:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Counting the cost: fears badger cull could worsen bovine TB crisis | Environment | The Guardian

"It's very hard to count an animal that lives underground and only comes out at night," says Prof Rosie Woodroffe, standing in the fresh earth strewn outside a foot-wide hole in a Cornish cattle field. "Badgers love digging," she observes, among the brambles and elders that thrive on the disturbed ground.

Below stone tors and with the salty smell of the sea in the air, Woodroffe is doing what she has done for much of the past 15 years: trapping badgers for science. "The badgers are fat this year," she says. "The wet spring means there's lots of earthworms." But a dry summer could mean four in every five cubs die, she warns, and it is uncertainties in population like these that mean she is seriously worried about the controversial badger culls due to start after 1 June.

The culls are intended to curb the rise of bovine tuberculosis: more than 37,000 cattle were slaughtered in 2012, at a cost to the taxpayer of £100m. But farmers in the pilot cull areas in Gloucestershire and Somerset have to tread a fine line: kill too many badgers and they will break the law against local extinctions of the protected animal, while killing too few means escaping badgers will spread TB even further. The problem, says Woodroffe, is the real number of badgers is hard to establish. Initial estimates were made by counting badger setts.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:35:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bovine TB wasn't a problem in the 60s. This was because of the "Attested Herd scheme". Very successful in reducing TB, but farmers hated it and got it stopped. now they want to kill badgers to prevent having to return to it.

Bourne said new measures still fail to recognise the problem that the test frequently gives false negatives, ie passes infected cows as healthy. When they are moved, they carry infection to new farms.

Bourne said this could be overcome, as in the 1950s and 1960s, by banning any movement between heavily tested TB-free herds and herds which had not been heavily tested. "The attested herd scheme was successful in UK in the 50s and 60s and was the basis of eradication in Australia," he said. "But farmers would not like it and this is why it is unlikely to happen."



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 03:31:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, that was my conclusion when I tried to understand why bovine TB was such a huge problem in England, and not in France (or Ireland) with very similar ecosystems.

I concluded that it was about the sociology of cattle-trading. I'm guessing the right to buy and sell one's cows freely must represent some landmark historical conquest, viscerally defended at all costs, perhaps dating to the end of feudalism.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 03:57:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
South Korea warns of potential power shortage - Asia-Pacific - Al Jazeera English

South Korea has suspended operations in two nuclear power reactors and extended a shutdown of a third to replace parts that were supplied using fake certificates.

The government warned on Tuesday there could be "unprecedented" electricity shortages and rolling blackouts this summer due to the nuclear shutdowns.

The latest closures, which are part of a widening investigation into the supply of cables provided with falsified safety certificates, mean that 10 of the country's 23 nuclear reactors are currently offline.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:38:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
 LIVING ON THE PLANET 
 Society, Culture, History, Information 


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:17:26 PM EST
Rubens drawing emerges from Reading University store cupboard | Art and design | guardian.co.uk

There are Peter Paul Rubens drawings of Marie de' Medici, the queen of France, in the collections of the British Museum, the V&A, the Louvre and, it emerged Tuesday, to some astonishment, the University of Reading.

Reading's picture of Marie de' Medici, the second wife of Henry IV of France, was almost certainly done "on the spot, from life", and probably drawn in 1622. For decades it had been stored at the university in a locked cupboard.

"It was very exciting indeed," said Anna Gruetzner Robins, a professor at the university. "A Rubens in the cupboard! It is not what you expect to find.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:29:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Austrian doctors make breakthrough in cervical cancer precursor treatment: media - Xinhua | English.news.cn

A new non-surgical suppository treatment for the precursors of cervical cancer has been developed by the Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC) Vienna, media report said Monday.

The CCC, a facility of the Medical University of Vienna and the Vienna General Hospital (AKH) developed the procedure and has now successfully tested it in a clinical trial, Austria Press Agency reported.

Infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) via a precursor - cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) - can lead to cervical cancer. The new therapeutic approach was developed to spare patients the stressful surgical procedures and risk of preterm birth that come with the cone biopsy, the standard treatment up to now.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:43:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
French finally embrace 'French kissing' | Les blogs
It's one of the most eagerly-awaited lists to appear each year in France, rivaling the official selection of the Cannes Film Festival and stars in the Michelin Guide: the new words inscribed into the French dictionary.

Le Petit Robert, one of two best-selling dictionaries in France, has just unveiled a set of entries (including words, proper names and events) that will make their debut in the 2014 edition.

Many are surprising, some baffling, while others are so familiar you wonder why they didn't make it into the book of reference before.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 02:52:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
French report calls for indoor ban on e-cigarettes - FRANCE - FRANCE 24

When it comes to smoking, nobody does it quite like the French.

They are so famous for it, there is even a smoking style named the "French inhale" so everyone can smoke comme ça.

However, since a 2008 smoking ban, the French of course have not been able to brandish their beloved Gauloises in smoky cafés as they did in the old films.

But in recent years, a growing number of Frenchmen and women - an estimated 500,000, according to French authorities - succeeded in coping with the ban by using electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 02:54:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"French inhale": has anyone French heard of it before?

"beloved Gauloises": the French quit Gauloises for Virginia-type tobacco a quarter of a century ago.

The e-cigarette story: this is making a media fuss in France. What isn't, is that Bertrand Dautzenberg, who is pushing this anti-e-cigarette noise, may well be linked to other types of (big Pharma not to say Pfizer) miracle remedies for weaning smokers off tobacco. At least, he was a few years back, and is wary of declaring his interests now. So maybe e-cigs are not good, but maybe they are OK after all.

All in all: FRANCE 24 is SUCH rubbish

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:06:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
To treat e-cigarettes the same way as tobacco cigarettes in any context is incomprehensible to any person who can operate their brain in a rational manner.  They have nothing to do with each other outside of propaganda/media context, which tells you what drives the people who propose such laws.
by paving on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:46:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
there must be some britguv agitpropper in the bowels of whitehall writing these anti-french slurs, french letters anyone?

e-cigs outlets are a booming industry here in italy, popping up like mushrooms, along with instant-cash-for-gold stores, and casinos in roma tiburtina.

slithering towards the third world... next up, little pavement kiosks to buy one toke of e-nicotine, and home delivery lottery tickets by push-bike couriers, day-old pizza sales, and euthanasia bingo.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 08:51:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well there's a Warren Zevon song called "The French Inhaler" so it's not just made up

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 01:50:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But like a number of things supposedly "French", the French wouldn't recognize it as specifically French, or might not even recognize it at all.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 02:57:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bof. C'est la vie, mon ami.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu May 30th, 2013 at 04:02:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Boy wins two-year legal fight over police record of school assault - Crime - News - London Evening Standard

A teenager has won a two-year battle to force Scotland Yard to correct false information held about him in police records.

Jonathan Fromings launched a civil action against Met Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe after he found the force held inaccurate details of him on its crime database.

He was the victim of an assault at his school in south London when he was 16 and suffered a broken eye socket and bruising. 9

Footage from CCTV cameras shows he was attacked by a fellow pupil but his family discovered that police records accused him of starting the fight, as well as giving false information about his injuries and the CCTV.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 02:58:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Queen of shock fiction 'pillaged private life' of lover's ex-partner - Telegraph

Paris' criminal court ordered the 53-year old writer, along with her publisher Flammarion, to pay 40,000 euros (£34,000) in damages for "invasion of the intimacy of private life" of Elise Bidoit, who said the novel had wrecked her life.

Miss Angot's works of "autofiction" - a form of fictionalised autobiography - have seen her recount "incest" with her father and torrid sex sessions with her rapper ex-boyfriend in a lift, mingled with prosaic musings on daily life.

Fans have praised them as courageous, pioneering prose that challenges social and literary taboos. Detractors say it is Gallic navel-gazing narcissism of the worst kind.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:11:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Discovered: A Cave Art Complex That Could Be the Lascaux of Mexico - Megan Garber - The Atlantic

In 1940, an 18-year-old apprentice mechanic named Marcel Ravidat was walking with three friends and a dog named Robot in the woods near Montignac, France. Ravidat happened upon a hole that happened to lead, Alice in Wonderland-like, to an underground cave. And that cave, it happened, was the home of some 600 paintings and 1,500 engravings, the work of humans who lived some 17,000 years ago. The caves' walls were the craggy canvases for humanity's oldest known experiments with art.

We may have another Lascaux on our hands. Only this one is set in Mexico. Archaeologists just announced that they've uncovered nearly 5,000 cave paintings at 11 different sites in the Sierra de San Carlos, a mountain range in the state of Tamaulipas. The paintings, which are striking in their vividness, are thought to be the work of hunter-gatherers who traveled the area in their wanderings. The artwork has not yet been dated, but the Tamaulipas region overall, archaeologists believe, was occupied by nomadic tribes as early as 6000 BC -- so there's a chance the paintings could be some 8,000 years old.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:42:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Google Testing Blimp Broadband in Africa - Blimpband: Long Promised, Never Delivered | DSLReports.com, ISP Information
For years we've talked about the idea of "stratellites" -- or blimps proposed for use primarily as communications vessels either in military conflict, disaster zones, or in rural markets. One of the "leaders" (the term is used loosely) in the field has been Sanswire Networks, whose "blimpband" services have made hype-drenched headlines for years yet never actually materialized. Now Google is breathing new life into the blimpband market with the news that they're tinkering with blimp-based broadband" for use in markets like Africa:


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:45:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cambridge Journals Online - Behavioral and Brain Sciences - Abstract - Peer-review practices of psychological journals: The fate of published articles, submitted again

A growing interest in and concern about the adequacy and fairness of modern peer-review practices in publication and funding are apparent across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Although questions about reliability, accountability, reviewer bias, and competence have been raised, there has been very little direct research on these variables.

The present investigation was an attempt to study the peer-review process directly, in the natural setting of actual journal referee evaluations of submitted manuscripts. As test materials we selected 12 already published research articles by investigators from prestigious and highly productive American psychology departments, one article from each of 12 highly regarded and widely read American psychology journals with high rejection rates (80%) and nonblind refereeing practices.

With fictitious names and institutions substituted for the original ones (e.g., Tri-Valley Center for Human Potential), the altered manuscripts were formally resubmitted to the journals that had originally refereed and published them 18 to 32 months earlier. Of the sample of 38 editors and reviewers, only three (8%) detected the resubmissions. This result allowed nine of the 12 articles to continue through the review process to receive an actual evaluation: eight of the nine were rejected. Sixteen of the 18 referees (89%) recommended against publication and the editors concurred. The grounds for rejection were in many cases described as "serious methodological flaws." A number of possible interpretations of these data are reviewed and evaluated.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 01:50:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's endearingly meta.
And absolutely damning.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 04:27:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 PEOPLE AND KLATSCH 
 

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:17:52 PM EST
Longest-serving football manager in England calls it a day after 50 years | Football | guardian.co.uk

The longest-serving manager in English football history, Jimmy Davies, will bow out on Tuesday evening when the Liverpool County Premier League side Waterloo Dock play their final match of the season against Red Rum.

Davies, 71, has managed the club for its entire 50-year history and was the driving force behind its formation in Clubmoor, near Anfield, in 1963 when he and some fellow dockworkers set the ball rolling.

After making a handful of less-than-impressive appearances as a player, he decided management was probably a better option. He hasn't looked back since. He has won 72 trophies in 50 years and puts his longevity down to a winning mentality similar to that of another recent retiree of the same age, Sir Alex Ferguson.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:19:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC Sport - Women's football: Doncaster Belles demotion 'scandalous'

The Football Association's decision to drop Doncaster Rovers Belles into the second tier of women's football from next season is "morally scandalous", says the boss of a rival club.

The FA has decided Manchester City will replace the Belles in the top flight.

But Arsenal's general manager Vic Akers said: "Donny have the support of all the league's current clubs.

"I've spoken to all seven and we all feel what the FA has done is unjust - in my opinion it's morally scandalous."



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 01:19:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The FA have a terrible record with regard to women's football in the UK. I don't think they should be handling it at all.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed May 29th, 2013 at 03:38:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wikipedia: Lamest Edit Wars
Conclusion: Tasty snacks in the Middle East are hilariously politicized. The talk page for Hummus currently states: "The article Hummus, along with other articles relating to the Arab-Israeli conflict, is currently subject to active arbitration remedies".


In the long run, we're all misquoted — not Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue May 28th, 2013 at 03:55:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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