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Open Thread 18-24 May

by afew Mon May 18th, 2015 at 01:44:39 AM EST

168 hours


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A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon May 18th, 2015 at 05:04:57 AM EST
to save you paging through several layers of thetiwtterverse, here's the direct link

Jacobin - Mark Blyth - Ending the Creditor's Paradise

As I sat in my office at Brown University on December 16, 2014, an email popped into my inbox with the title "Herzlichen Glückwunsch - Sie sind der 1. Preisträger des Hans-Matthöfer-Preises für wirtschaftspublizistik." This was the award given by the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung (FES), the research foundation closest to the German Social Democratic Party (SPD), and the Hans-Matthöfer Stiftung for the best economics publication in German in 2014. I was, to say the least, surprised.

My 2013 Oxford University Press book, Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea, had recently been translated into German by the publishing arm of the FES. Indeed, I had been there a month earlier, in Berlin, to do a book launch, which was very well attended. Since then the book has been reviewed, positively, in the German press, with Suddeutsche Zeitung giving it a rather glowing review. Something odd was going on.

Clearly, despite the impression we get in the US, there was movement away from the "austerity is the only way" approach to thinking about the eurozone crisis in Berlin, at least among the social democrats -- but how much movement?



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon May 18th, 2015 at 01:11:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sometimes people gotta rant. Richard Baker MSP wrote an insipid article at Labour Hame (Scottish Labour party site) entitled Separation is still not the answer.

"Annette" replied in comments with this almighty rant (linked from her home page) which seems be going very viral. Not only is it a stunning critique of Labour over the last 20 years, I'm sure this applies to other countries as well (lookin' at you, Francois Hollande).

Read. Enjoy.

Virtuella - Annette - "So listen to me well, Labour Party, because if you get this wrong again you will be done for, once and for all"

Thanks a lot, Labour Party. Thanks to you we will be governed for another five years by the party that has pushed people into poverty in their droves, that has seen suicide rates soar among the sick and disabled, and food banks spread like a fungus. Thanks to you the party that has brought the UK's economic recovery to a standstill whilst doubling the national debt can go on wrecking what is left of our assets and destroy the environment as collateral damage. Thanks to you, Ian Duncan Smith will be allowed to continue his assault on the most vulnerable and Theresa May can go on slashing our civil rights in the name of fighting terrorism. Thanks to you the rich will get even richer while everyone else will get poorer and the NHS in England may as well pack up and go home. It is your fault, Labour Party, that the Tories now have a clear majority, unchecked even by what little moderation the Lib Dems might have been able to impose. The Tory reign has been so abysmal, you ought to have won this election by a landslide. You failed.

Now don't you dare even think of blaming Scotland. In Scotland, we did our bit to bring down the ConLib coalition: we ousted all but two of them. Actually, Carmichael and Mundell won by very narrow margins and if you hadn't been so hell-bent on fighting your potential allies, the SNP, we might have got rid of those two as well. In any case, Scotland has reduced the coalition's seat count by ten. All you had to do was add a little to the Labour seats in England and Wales and we'd have been home and dry. But no, not you. You lost big time.

I'm going to help you out here, Labour, because I have watched your decline for a long time and it seems clear that you have not the foggiest idea where you have gone wrong. That is why almost everything you did to improve your prospects has only made things worse. So let me try to explain.......



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon May 18th, 2015 at 12:54:26 PM EST
Ch4 - Paul Mason - Greece: Europe's last-ditch effort to keep it in euro?

After a weekend of leak and counter-leak, in which we learned Greece cannot make critical payments to its lenders due from 5 June, today has seen another dramatic development: the leak to the newspaper To Vima of the European Commission's proposal to break the logjam.

According to To Vima, the EU commission boss has offered Greece a deal that delays the harshest austerity for two years, and releases €5bn of bailout money to help fill the gaps in the Greek budget.

To get the money Greece has to:......



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon May 18th, 2015 at 04:01:58 PM EST
The juicy bit is at the end:
If the Germans veto it, then it leaves Alexis Tsipras with nothing palatable to sell his own voters.

A German veto would, if it came to a euro exit referendum, probably play well for those advocating a "controlled exit". Greeks would no longer be seen as walking away from the euro, since the commission had offered them a compromise - but from a Europe where the commission has no power, and only the voters of Germany get their way.

A referendum to stay in the Euro on terms dictated by Germany or a controlled exit would seem a likelier win for #Grexit, since it is a clearest possible vote for or against surrendering all economic sovereignty to Germany.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Mon May 18th, 2015 at 10:13:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]


A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue May 19th, 2015 at 05:24:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by generic on Tue May 19th, 2015 at 02:51:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Much better.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 06:19:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cartoonist Luz to quit Charlie Hebdo | Media | The Guardian

The Charlie Hebdo cartoonist Luz, who drew the satirical magazine's front cover picture of the prophet Muhammad following the murders of its editorial team in January, has said that he is leaving the publication.

Renald Luzier said his departure in September was unconnected to internal tensions at the publication, but rather that the job without his slain colleagues had become "too much to bear".

"This is a very personal choice," Luz, who joined Charlie Hebdo in 1992, said in an interview with French newspaper Libération on Monday.

"Each issue is torture because the others are gone. Spending sleepless nights summoning the dead, wondering what Charb, Cabu, Honoré, Tignous would have done is exhausting," the cartoonist said, referring to his colleagues killed on 7 January.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue May 19th, 2015 at 01:38:20 AM EST
An EU perspective on wage inequality
Wage inequality has been increasing overall in Europe since the onset of the Great Recession, and is mainly due to rising wage inequalities within countries, according to a new report from Eurofound, the Dublin-based EU Agency. This marks a reversal of a process of convergence in wage levels that was taking place before 2008, and could be a cause for concern regarding the cohesion of the EU.

Those are the key findings of Eurofound's new report 'Recent developments in the distribution of wages in Europe' which was launched earlier this week. Despite a large body of research on income inequalities, this report takes an innovative focus on wage inequality from an EU perspective. The report gives an overview of recent developments in the distribution of wages in Europe from 2002 to 2011 - the period before and after the Great Recession.

The report shows that the level of wage inequality in the EU as a whole is below that of the US. However, wage inequality in the UK, the EU's most unequal country, is now above that of the US average. The UK, Latvia and Portugal are the three most unequal countries in Europe.



"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Tue May 19th, 2015 at 10:24:43 AM EST
Eurostat were actually capable of doing its job. Namely, studying inequality in the EU-28, along the same lines as what the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Census Bureau do in the United States: measure gini both pre- and post-income transfers for citizens and residents of all its states.

The EU does not do this; one need rely on various studies, interpret methodology, and so forth, and the results are sometimes contradictory, some showing EU inequality as higher even than the US, many lower, and so forth. But the fact remains, this should be something Eurostat does; instead it does some silly population-weighted average of member state's individual ginis which, in this day of putatively free movement of labour and capital, is simply not serious.

The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet. Winston Churchill

by r------ on Tue May 19th, 2015 at 10:56:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Melanchthon:
The UK, Latvia and Portugal are the three most unequal countries in Europe.
Conservatives High-Five News Britain Is Most Unequal EU Country | The Morning Gerald
'Since Maggie came to power, successive governments have ruled in her image. Finally, the rich are getting there on the shoulders of the poor.'
by das monde on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 03:49:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]


"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Tue May 19th, 2015 at 10:52:41 AM EST
Wow, look at that unemployment rate for the USA! U!S!A! U!S!A! U!S!A!

Luckily I don't speak French, so I could not possibly comprehend that that the decorative illustration behind the unemployment rate is illustrating a hidden "Lesser Depression" in the US labor market. Because if I could understand the other part of the graph, it would go a long way toward explaining why I am here, teaching in Beijing.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 01:21:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
occasional contributor, marco, is in Beijing.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 01:35:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Deutsche Bank fires warning shot over UK vote on EU exit

Deutsche Bank is reviewing whether to move chunks of its large British operations to Germany if the UK leaves the EU, underlining the potential fallout in the City of London in the event of "Brexit".

The biggest German lender by assets, which employs 9,000 people in the UK, is the first big bank to start formally examining the consequences of a British referendum on EU membership, which is due in the next two years.



"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet
by Melanchthon on Tue May 19th, 2015 at 01:28:22 PM EST
Scientists examine why men even exist
From a purely biological standpoint, the existence of the male sex is kind of perplexing: When it's time to create a new generation, the males of a species often contribute nothing but genetic material to the mix.

["...] We wanted to understand how Darwinian selection can allow this widespread and seemingly wasteful reproductive system to persist, when a system where all individuals produce offspring without sex -- as in all-female asexual populations -- would be a far more effective route to reproduce greater numbers of offspring."

One explanation is that sex allows for sexual selection, which is inherently good for the species. When females get to choose one male over another (or vice versa, depending on the sexual politics of the species), there's a better genetic outcome for the species than when sex just happens at random [...]

To test how important selection is to the benefits of sexual reproduction, they pulled selection out of the equation. In one test group, beetles were randomly paired up into monogamous couples. Others had an increasingly uneven male-to-female ratio, with the most extreme group having only 10 females to 90 males. That meant the ladies had plenty of choices, whereas the control group females had no choice at all.

After seven years under those conditions, the researchers tested how resilient each group was to inbreeding, with a brother and sister being mated every generation. The groups that had been allowed the most selection survived as many as 20 inbred generations, while all the groups with weak or non-existent selection went extinct by the 10th.

by das monde on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 05:33:29 AM EST
So, the world will be dominated, after a few hundred generations or so, by Chinese and Indians, who will be phenotypically superior to people from other cultures. That's if current trends of selective abortion giving rise to an excess of males in those countries continues and worsens, as seems likely.

That's if we're comparing with cultures where males and females are randomly paired up without having any choice in the matter. Not sure if such cultures exist, either in humans or in beetles; I suppose cultures where arranged marriages predominate might be an approximation.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 11:31:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The limit of biological extrapolations is resources. An excuse for my mantra again, but the popular implication of the evolution theory (just multiply faster than others!) ignores the resources completely - while it a central factor in the evolution. Dealing with resources should be added to the characteristic definition of life (next to growth, reproduction, homeostasis, metabolism).

With limited resources, selection acquires real purpose, while effectiveness of reproduction has no value. The cumbersome sex could be the ingenious nature method to hamper reproduction, making the organisms more "aware" of the resources. That is why the "traditional" gender divisions will not go away easily. A female basically requires a safe environment, adequate resources - whatever the "global" situation in the environment is. Females select for males who are best aware of the environment and can provide what is needed.

Experimentation with sexual choices (of beetles, preferably) looks fascinating. What do the scientists do now with their special beetles? How do they adopt to a sudden change of choice regime? Is there an effect of 10% male and 90% female ratio?

As for the world domination by Chinese, Indians: ethnic groups will be just happy to survive consistently without badly loosing their genome, culture. The real game is not by reproduction numbers, but how resources are controlled. The Indians and Chinese might have an edge with their reproductive trends and (apparently) long histories of living on that edge - for having more individuals near the top of the global domination pyramid.

by das monde on Thu May 21st, 2015 at 12:00:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]


A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 21st, 2015 at 08:48:11 AM EST
OECD: Improving job quality and reducing gender gaps are essential to tackling growing inequality
1/05/2015 - Income inequality has reached record highs in most OECD countries and remains at even higher levels in many emerging economies. The richest 10 per cent of the population in the OECD now earn 9.6 times the income of the poorest 10 per cent, up from 7:1 in the 1980s and 9:1 in the 2000s, according to a new OECD report.

"In It Together: Why Less Inequality Benefits All" also shows that wealth is even more concentrated at the top than income, exacerbating the overall disadvantage of low-income households. In 2012, the bottom 40% owned only 3% of total household wealth in the 18 OECD countries with comparable data. By contrast, the top 10% controlled half of all total household wealth and the wealthiest 1% owned 18%.

"We have reached a tipping point. Inequality in OECD countries is at its highest since records began," said OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría, launching the report in Paris with Marianne Thyssen, European Commissioner for Employment, Social Affairs, Skills and Labour Mobility. "The evidence shows that high inequality is bad for growth. The case for policy action is as much economic as social. By not addressing inequality, governments are cutting into the social fabric of their countries and hurting their long-term economic growth."



"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

by Melanchthon on Thu May 21st, 2015 at 09:44:14 AM EST
Harvard Business Review: When workers began falling behind



"Dieu se rit des hommes qui se plaignent des conséquences alors qu'ils en chérissent les causes" Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

by Melanchthon on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 10:17:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Germany to have director on China-initiated AIIB bank's board, says envoy  South China Morning Post    

 Germany will have a director on the board of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), according to the nation's envoy to China, Michael Clauss.



"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu May 21st, 2015 at 01:05:09 PM EST
And The Weak Suffer What They Must?: Europe's Crisis and America's Economic Future. Due to appear Jan 5. Current Amazon sales rank #387,923
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu May 21st, 2015 at 03:24:30 PM EST


A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri May 22nd, 2015 at 12:03:11 PM EST
I know this is a satirical headline, but it typifies the daftness of the Labour leadership contest as they try to demonstrate they are the true right wing candidate.

Daily Mash -
Liz Kendall to punch UK's last coal miner


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri May 22nd, 2015 at 02:04:07 PM EST
and a reminder from the film "made in Dagenham" to the Labour party that once principles mattered

[Rita gives an impromptu speech at the trade union conference]

Rita O'Grady: My best friend lost her husband recently. He was a gunner in the 50 Squadron in the RAF. Got shot down one time, on a raid to Essen. And even though he was badly injured, he managed to bail out. I asked him why he joined the RAF, and he said "Well, they've got the best women, haven't they?"

[audience laughs]

Rita O'Grady: And then he said "Well, you've got to do something, haven't you? You had to do something, that was a given. Cos it was a matter of principle. You had to stand up. You had to do what was right. Cos otherwise you wouldn't be able to look at yourself in the mirror." When did that change, eh? When did we, in this country, decide to stop fighting? I don't think we ever did. But you've got to back us up. You've got to stand up with us. We are the working classes - the men and the women. We're not separated by sex, but only by those who are willing to accept injustice and those like our friend George who are prepared to go into battle for what is right. And equal pay for women is right.

When did that change, eh? When did we, in this country, decide to stop fighting?

When did we stop fighting?


keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat May 23rd, 2015 at 04:17:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hitler was such a conveniently easy cartoon Bad Guy enemy, even a four year old can grasp the moral issues involved at that time.
These days the enemy is infinitely more subtle, he is us and the planet-raping consumerist 'lifestyle' we have been embedded into prolonging.
No more easy binaries in this morality play...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat May 23rd, 2015 at 07:43:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, ISIS easily matches Hitler, but they are limited to a specific geography/demography. But you are right about the insidious nature of our current problem. The Anglo version of financial capitalism has gained such control over the governments, the mass media and even academia that it feels able to unleash the most brutal exploitation on an unprecedented scale. When large portions of the upper middle class come to see themselves and their offspring as victims of this system perhaps they can learn to find solidarity with those less fortunate than themselves. That is the first prerequisite to change.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat May 23rd, 2015 at 08:39:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Great film, that.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 01:12:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Invention of Capitalism: How a Self-Sufficient Peasantry was Whipped Into Industrial Wage Slaves

"The brutal acts associated with the process of stripping the majority of the people of the means of producing for themselves might seem far removed from the laissez-faire reputation of classical political economy," writes Perelman. "In reality, the dispossession of the majority of small-scale producers and the construction of laissez-faire are closely connected, so much so that Marx, or at least his translators, labeled this expropriation of the masses as ``primitive accumulation.''

Perelman outlines the many different policies through which peasants were forced off the land--from the enactment of so-called Game Laws that prohibited peasants from hunting, to the destruction of the peasant productivity by fencing the commons into smaller lots--but by far the most interesting parts of the book are where you get to read Adam Smith's proto-capitalist colleagues complaining and whining about how peasants are too independent and comfortable to be properly exploited, and trying to figure out how to force them to accept a life of wage slavery.

This pamphlet from the time captures the general attitude towards successful, self-sufficient peasant farmers:

The possession of a cow or two, with a hog, and a few geese, naturally exalts the peasant. . . . In sauntering after his cattle, he acquires a habit of indolence. Quarter, half, and occasionally whole days, are imperceptibly lost. Day labour becomes disgusting; the aversion in- creases by indulgence. And at length the sale of a half-fed calf, or hog, furnishes the means of adding intemperance to idleness.

While another pamphleteer wrote:

Nor can I conceive a greater curse upon a body of people, than to be thrown upon a spot of land, where the productions for subsistence and food were, in great measure, spontaneous, and the climate required or admitted little care for raiment or covering.

John Bellers, a Quaker "philanthropist" and economic thinker saw independent peasants as a hindrance to his plan of forcing poor people into prison-factories, where they would live, work and produce a profit of 45% for aristocratic owners:

"Our Forests and great Commons (make the Poor that are upon them too much like the Indians) being a hindrance to Industry, and are Nurseries of Idleness and Insolence."

Daniel Defoe, the novelist and trader, noted that in the Scottish Highlands "people were extremely well furnished with provisions. ... venison exceedingly plentiful, and at all seasons, young or old, which they kill with their guns whenever they find it.''

To Thomas Pennant, a botanist, this self-sufficiency was ruining a perfectly good peasant population:

"The manners of the native Highlanders may be expressed in these words: indolent to a high degree, unless roused to war, or any animating amusement."

If having a full belly and productive land was the problem, then the solution to whipping these lazy bums into shape was obvious: kick `em off the land and let em starve.

Arthur Young, a popular writer and economic thinker respected by John Stuart Mill, wrote in 1771: "everyone but an idiot knows that the lower classes must be kept poor, or they will never be industrious." Sir William Temple, a politician and Jonathan Swift's boss, agreed, and suggested that food be taxed as much as possible to prevent the working class from a life of "sloth and debauchery."

Temple also advocated putting four-year-old kids to work in the factories, writing ``for by these means, we hope that the rising generation will be so habituated to constant employment that it would at length prove agreeable and entertaining to them.'' Some thought that four was already too old. According to Perelmen, "John Locke, often seen as a philosopher of liberty, called for the commencement of work at the ripe age of three."

Stop coddling the weak! Insolence must be extirpated at root. Market forces, ya know...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri May 22nd, 2015 at 07:13:27 PM EST
I am unable to comment on gmoke's diary. Some 50 character nonsense, even with a 15 character comment.

Can anyone explain?

Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other. -- Dr Johnson

by melvin (melvingladys at or near yahoo.com) on Sat May 23rd, 2015 at 03:54:37 AM EST
Do you know that there is a limit for subject length?
by generic on Sat May 23rd, 2015 at 04:08:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Aha! Thank you.

Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other. -- Dr Johnson
by melvin (melvingladys at or near yahoo.com) on Sat May 23rd, 2015 at 04:10:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Put the 15-character comment in the comment subject field followed by "(n/t)" (no text in the comment body).

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat May 23rd, 2015 at 05:54:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Prediction: Sweden wins; Italy, Belgium, Latvia may do well.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat May 23rd, 2015 at 05:34:16 PM EST
Wow, I never made this good a prediction: Sweden did win and the others I named all in the top six. (And I missed most of 2nd-placed Russia's perfomance.)

Zero points this time: Austria (three bearded men) and Germany (an R&B act with nothing extra).


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sat May 23rd, 2015 at 06:58:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've never understood the eurovision song contest, but that's probably cos I'm not really a popster; never was.

Also, judging by the results, being British doesn't help me understand it either

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 03:48:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
and being French doesn't help any better apparently.
by Bernard on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 05:56:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It is a vision about Europe.

A Europe where everybody is strange, and strange can be surprisingly good. A Europe where political fragmentation and cultures that span borders are rewarded and populations of political rivals hand each other douze points. A Europe defined solely by who wants to be in Europe and everbody are welcome (hello, Australia!)

Bigger in the periphery then in the political center, but perhaps it will become big in post-Brexit England when Scotland hands England douze point despite that song not really being that good.

by fjallstrom on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 03:19:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
OK, douze points!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 03:42:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i dunno, if the Scots enter with the Proclaimers singing
500 miles, we might invade as a humanitarian gesture in order to prevent the spread of the infection

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 04:27:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
To me, EV is an overproduced overhyped bore, very nearly as boring as American Idol. Give me the street performers around the edges of the Celtic Connections fest, any day.

Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other. -- Dr Johnson
by melvin (melvingladys at or near yahoo.com) on Mon May 25th, 2015 at 06:03:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Public buildings display the flag at half-mast in memory of those fallen in WW1. This is against Renzi's wishes who wanted extra flags flown today to celebrate the start of the war (Alto Adige decided to simply ignore the date)

More details.

A restaurant

Giro d'Italia

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 10:53:21 AM EST
According to National Geographic UK
01 Abraham Path, Middle East

"I started walking these hills when I was seven, collecting wild honey with my father," says Habib, my guide. We're in the northern West Bank. From east to west, he points out the outcrops of Jordan, the banks of the Dead Sea, an Israeli settlement, two Palestinian villages, pale hills, Ramallah city and, in the distant haze, Jerusalem. It's a lot to take in. "I still love to walk. It's in my head, in my heart. If I have a problem, a big thing to think about, I come here and walk," Habib adds.

In the Middle East there are a lot of big things to think about. It's one of the reasons the Abraham Path -- a long-distance hiking trail that, once complete, will stitch a route across almost the entire region; through Turkey, Syria, Jordan, Palestine and Israel -- is such a singular project. It currently comprises over 280 miles of trails, with more added each year.

From the article, it seems like the rating is for the Palestinian section, not the Syrian one.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 02:52:51 PM EST


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