Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.

Is the UK about to have a radical Brexiteer regime?

by Migeru Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 03:23:22 PM EST

I am persuaded that Brexit is essentially a revolutionary English nationalist movement. In so far as social science allows generalisation about revolutions, Crane Brinton's classic analysis concluded that

revolutions followed a life-cycle from the Old Order to a moderate regime to a radical regime, to Thermidorian reaction.
I would suggest that David Cameron represented the ancien régime, and that Theresa May - herself a eurosceptic Remainer - has led the moderate revolutionary Brexit regime.


Now that her negotiators have reached an Withdrawal Agreement with the EU she faces a backbench rebellion that has until the end of next week to topple her before she can formally agree the WA with the European Council next Sunday. If radical Brexiteers remove her, I would expect a radical Brexit revolutionary regime to follow.

In this context, the rule of the radicals means a hard brexiteer PM, a purge of the moderates, and no-deal Brexit. As the economic consequences of no-deal bite, especially after next April Fools', the radical regime will turn to blaming the EU and the domestic enemies of the people, ushering a period of "revolutionary terror".

It could get ugly. There won't be state-sanctioned violence but there have been plenty of warnings - often taken seriously by, ahem, serious people - that stopping Brexit would lead to civil unrest. If, as is likely, no-deal Bexit leads to immediate hardship, it will be blamed on EU vindicativeness and on a fifth column stabbing the UK in the back. There could be repeats of the murder of pro-Remain MP Jo Cox in the run-up to the Brexit referendum. Soft Brexiteers, Remainers, EU citizens and brown people may be targeted by more or less random hate crimes.

And then, after an unspecified period of time, a Thermidorian reaction would usher in an authoritarian government to restore order and at least partially reverse Brexit.

Poll
How plausible is the above scenario?
. I'm certain that's what's going to happen 0%
. It is likely 7%
. It sounds plausible 53%
. It's a bit far-fetched 38%
. You've been reading too many dead white guys 0%

Votes: 13
Results | Other Polls
Display:
I have always thought (and probably written here as well), that whatever bad things happening to Britons now and after Brexit, especially if we crash into a no-deal one, will be blamed by the Brexiteers to "Brussels IntransigenceTM": the revanchiste Frogs, the imperial Krauts, the traitorous Paddies, you name it...

The alternative would be to let the public blame the Brexiteers themselves for selling take-back-control snake oil with bullshit-on-the-side-of-a-bus promises.

This is the obvious strategy to deflect blame and, sadly, the British pubic is a particularly fertile ground for xenophobia, having been drilled for decades into the idea that Johnny Foreigner in general and the EU in particular is the root of all evils that assail Britain.

I'll expect a lot of aggressive attitudes vis a vis the EU countries, backed by one of Europe's biggest militaries. Spain better be careful with Gibraltar or it could turn into Falklands 2.0

The only remaining question, really, is: how bad will it get?

Based on history, it looks like Britain doesn't generally do "radical revolutions" eventually followed by Thermidorian reaction, but hey, there was Cromwell, and the Brits have beheaded their king one century before we, French, came around to do the same.

by Bernard on Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 05:39:25 PM EST
Regarding history, in Brinton's book of Cromwell is indeed the equivalent to Napoleon in the Thermidorian section stage of the English revolution of the 17th century.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 07:42:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In that analysis (which I haven't read, though the overall notion sounds familiar to me), is it Napoleon = Cromwell = Stalin?

I used to be afew. I'm still not many.
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 10:07:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Brits have beheaded their king

Either the English beheaded their king, or the Brits beheaded their queen. Your choice....

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 08:01:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Must be the English then :)
At least, I didn't write it was the king of Ook

(the original YT video embed in das monde comment seems to be broken, probably when migrating the site to HTTPS)

by Bernard on Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 09:22:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Charles I was king of England (and Wales), and Scotland, and Ireland...

I used to be afew. I'm still not many.
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 10:09:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So in your analogy, who plays the role of the Vendée? Scotland or Northern Ireland?
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 08:02:16 PM EST
Must be the DUP defending the Crown; although the vendéens were, and still are, strongly Catholics; this where the analogy doesn't travel too well.
by Bernard on Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 09:25:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The strength of Brinton's analysis does not rely on one to one correct analogies. In the case of the UK, it is officially Anglican while North Ireland is another version of protestant. So this could be a case of a group of 'ultras' rebelling against the established order.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 10:14:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is not widely known, outside Ireland, that Catholic Nationalists and Irish Presbyterian Scots (i.e. the fore-runners of the DUP) and other protestant dissenters often made common cause against the crown and the established Anglican Church which sought to impose penal laws or episcopalian rule on them. Many of the Irish nationalist rebellious leaders where in fact protestant -  Wolfe Tone during the 1798 rebellion, Charles Stewart Parnell and the Home Rule movement, and Erskine Childers and the 1916 Easter Rising.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 11:54:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The same way that most people forget that some of the leading Palestinian terrorists (George Habash, Sirhan Sirhan) were or are Christian.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 08:13:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here in the US, essentially nobody knows about or cares about Brexit. Any hope for a bailout of England from this side of the pond based on some sort of "special relationship" should be looked at with some caution.

Not wanting to predict details of how England might collapse, but one might imagine a pre-EEC economy comparable to what they had in 1970, except worse because of the loss of the Commonwealth market, and with an entirely different (better) economic situation on the Continent. The UK in 1970 was pretty horrible; it could be a lot worse than that.

by asdf on Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 10:00:17 PM EST
The "special relationship" can be seen in another way : the UK has the choice between being half a vassal of the US and half a vassal of the EU (the one-foot-in, one-foot-out position of the last thirty years), and being an outright vassal of the US.

Which is what all the nonsense about sailing off to bright tomorrows boils down to.

I used to be afew. I'm still not many.

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 10:03:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How is the UK is more of a vassal of the US than Germany or Italy? Maybe after Brexit the UK will come begging to America for military support, but the current mood here would suggest they would be told to go whistle.*

*Except that "Go whistle" is not in the American English idiom.

by asdf on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 04:11:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
during the Cold War we were the permanently moored aircraft carrier off the coast. And damned useful as, unlike West Germany, it was impervious to an armoured strike.

Now, in the interent age, we are the plausibly deniable domestic spy. We have a mutal arrangment that allows our political masters to state with absolute truth we each do not spy on the electronic communications of their own population.

No, we let the other do it for us and then we read the transcripts.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 04:42:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't forget there has been wholesale de-industrialisation of the British economy since 1970, and most of Britain's industry and infrastructure is now owned by foreigners with no social ties to the UK. Once the UK is out of the CUSM, it will become a regional market of much lesser interest to global capital. Complex businesses with lengthy supply chains will tend to locate elsewhere. The financial services industry will become much less London centric. A lot depends on the nature of long term trade relations with the EU, but it can never be quite the same when the EU favours its own businesses.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 08:10:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hell, the US has been pretty explicit in saying Brexit is stupid the entire time outside of some babbling from Trumper comms types about "globalists".

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Dec 2nd, 2018 at 07:02:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I understand your logic up till the 'partially reverse Brexit' part.
Is this because you think an authoritarian UK will dovetail better with the (future, post-2019 elections?) EU?
Do UK elections play a part in your projected scenario (of an authoritarian government) or is it an unelected body that achieves this coup?

What are your predictions for the EU leadership elections next Spring? Do you think Brexit will influence them in some way?

Does the growing nationalist tendency in Europe threaten neoliberalism and its handmaiden - austerity?

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Nov 17th, 2018 at 11:36:55 PM EST
Partially reverse Brexit means something like EEA membership.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 at 03:54:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That would be a long time in the making.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Nov 22nd, 2018 at 10:01:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
tbh right now I think the ERG haven't got their 48 votes. Rees-Mogg got over excited on thursday and put his papers in without doing a count of how many were willing to follow him.

Even if there were to scrape 48 votes together, when it came to a nay or yea vote, which would be the next step, May would probably get overwhelming support from the rest of the Parliamentary party. Watching the Sunday politicals this morning, I got a real sense that people have had a cold shower and started to do their calculations and realised that May, deliberately or otherwise, has trapped them.

There's no time for a leadership contest. Acording to the rules there is a 12 week timetable for it to proceed, and that's without adding a week for Xmas. We leave the EU in 18 weeks. Even with a new leader, there is no time for any re-negotiation, even if the EU were willing.

So, there's no point in having a contest.

Also, NOBODY wants a no deal. Indeed, several people referred to an unofficial cross-party pact within Westminster that there is no way a no-deal would be allowed. Well, I say nobody; obviously there are a few, but fewer than 48 it seems.

So, it's a choice between this deal or no brexit. It has come down to this.
THAT IS THE CALCULATION THAT IS CONTRATING MINDS IN WESTMINSTER.

Not no-deal. They are worrying over the civil problem of no brexit and whether they can risk it. tbh If I were them, I'd worry too. And I'm a staunch Remainer

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 02:43:34 PM EST
That pair of options requires that the EU allow reversal of the Article 50 action, which is not clear yet.

Also, it seems to me that the No Deal option is still on the table because both the May Brexit and the Remain options require active positive votes in Parliament, while the No Deal option is the default if no other agreement is reached. Just because Remain is the second preference of everybody doesn't mean that it wins in a first past the post voting arrangement.

by asdf on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 04:19:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well, that is true, there has long been a presumption that A50 would be reversed if we asked nicely. A belief that has never been discouraged by anybody in the EU.

But, even if it were at the very last minute, any deal would be grasped in preference to no deal

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 04:44:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not actually clear how to get from the current situation to No Deal.

Currently No Deal is an unwanted default, but it has only has the support of a few tens of Tory headbangers and kooks, and Labour are trying to get an amendment added to prevent it.

If they headbangers can't unseat May, it's unlikely they can get No Deal through.

As for A50 - the official line still appears to be that the EU would prefer the UK to stay. A50 is a legal nicety, not an inviolable principle. Some arrangement would no doubt be found if needed.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 05:02:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Seems to me all Labour can do is add an amendment preventing the UK from getting ready for no deal.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 at 03:52:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Prolonging the A50 period is a possibility Barnier has dangled recently.

And the EU's wish to see the UK stay in has been clearly stated.

I used to be afew. I'm still not many.

by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Nov 20th, 2018 at 10:01:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Were the EU and the May's government be unable to come to an agreement workable for all, (if such an agreement is even possible), until 2020 then the new Parliamentary Elections could well resolve the whole question. A lot has been learned by many Brits about the consequences of Brexit and the staunchest proponents are dying off daily. When is the latest that a new election could be held?

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2018 at 02:20:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
TBH I'm surprised to ERG doesn't seem to be able to muster 48 votes. I had expected them to fail at the next hurdle: getting a majority against May.

That being the case, it comes down to a choice between this deal and no deal happening by default because May's deal can't get a majority in Parliament.

If May's deal doesn't get a majority, and the vast majority don't want no deal, then the only way out is to kick for touch to avoid civil unrest and let the people decide via a second referendum between May's deal and no Brexit.

Even that might require an A. 50 extension depending on how long it takes Parliament to come to that conclusion. Would countries at loggerheads with Brussels - Italy, Hungary, Poland - attach conditions to agreeing an A.50 extension?

Just when you think you've hit rock bottom you discover it's all downhill from here...

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 04:54:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
countries at loggerheads with Brussels?

How about countries antagonized by the Brexiteers over the past two years? Even countries that were supposed to be sympathetic to the UK, like in Scandinavia, the Baltics and Central Europe.

by Bernard on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 05:13:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My point is it only takes one country to block an A.50 extension, and their reason for doing so need bear little or no relationship to Brexit per se. The power of veto in one area can become a bargaining chip in an unrelated dispute. But yes, the UK in general and Brexiteers in particular have done enormous damage to the UK's cause. Farage seems to have antagonised just about everyone in the European Parliament. Those chickens might well come home to roost.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 08:16:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm going to do my absurdly, irritatingly optimistic routine here. I'm hardly ever right, but this seems to me a slightly more plausible outcome :

* It looks like they don't have the numbers for a spill : to quote my favourite pundit @borderirish :

The people who had the idea of Brexit but were too incompetent to actually organize it have now had the idea of staging a coup against their own idea but are too incompetent to actually organize it

  • There is not a Conservative majority for May's brexit, BUT :
  • As Helen notes, there is undoubtedly a majority of not-insane people in the Commons who, when push comes to shove, will not allow the wreckers to wreck
  • The only politically coherent way for this to happen is for Labour to offer their help in a second (lightning) round of negotiations, where Barnier whips out a few concessions from his hip pocket (I think the EU deciders are pretty much aware of the options, and I think they are ready to the extra couple of yards. Not the extra mile though)
  • Followed, not by a referendum, but a new election.


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 05:51:04 PM EST
It's either this or a military coup.

The British military are the usual hotbed of nationalism/fascism, and are conveniently sworn to defend the Crown - i.e. the gentry and the Tories - and not the country.

Unfortunately for the Tories, they have decimated the military (and the police, and most of the judiciary, and the NHS, etc...) and have made so many enemies that there can't be more than a handful of upper-middle officers who would seriously consider rolling out the tanks and firing on their own people.

It's a dangerous time. A coup would be most likely after No Deal, to cement the UK's descent into fascism. But while Parliament is still talking, the most likely outcome would be the military firing on each other.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 06:54:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think a renegotiation would have to follow new elections, for which there's hardly enough time left.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 at 01:45:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It strikes me that a re-negotiation of the actual Brexit accord is largely beside the point, there won't be much change obtained anyway. The beef is in the end-state negotiations.

These have hardly even started. A clearer statement of intent is supposed to be in the accord, and is apparently still work in progress; but its content will not set in stone the final relationship, which will be hammered out over two years following the brexit date.

That is when Labour has to be in charge. Hence the idea of Labour getting the deal over the line, in return for new elections.

But May would rather lead the country to no-deal hell, it would appear.
Guardian:

"We are adding more detail to the outline political declaration for it to become the future framework," May's spokesman said. "There is a lot of work to be done. The PM has described this period as `critical' and I would expect the talks this week to be intensive."
Negotiations this week should also provide clarity on the possible length of the transition period, should no agreement be in place by the current end date of December 2020.
The text of the agreement states that the period may be extended to "20XX" and it remains unclear whether this will be amended to show a fixed maximum date.
Earlier on Monday, the business secretary, Greg Clark, suggested that could be until December 2022. That idea had been raised by the EU's chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier at a meeting of ambassadors from the EU's 27 member states.
However, the prime minister's spokesman said she had been clear that the UK needed to have the agreement finalised before the next general election - the latest date that can be held is June 2022.


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 at 05:27:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The only way I can see the EU agreeing to an even marginal re-negotiation of the current deal is if the following conditions are met:
  1. May's deal is rejected by the House of Commons
  2. May - or however is then PM - agrees to put whatever new deal is negotiated to a second referendum.

The reason for the second condition is that it is by no means clear what concessions, if any, would persuade the House of Commons (read DUP and hard Brexiteers) to support a new deal. The EU would essentially be making concessions without any guarantee off a pay-off in terms of an agreement ratified by the UK. Ireland would only agree to further concessions if there was a prospect on no Brexit at all - via a second referendum.

From this point forward, there is a price to be paid for everything that moves...

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 at 03:31:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think for the revolutionary cycle described, the role of political violence is crucial. And in particular state violence.

Very roughly, you go from an authoritarian state with centralised control over violence to the authoritarian state losing control. That leads to a phase with different factions using violence against each other, escalating to fill out civil war. When violence has been established as acceptable means to grasp power, the revolutionaries turn the states violence against each other, until the combination of a winning faction, a political leader, a worn out public and the re-established structure of state violence means you have a new authoritarian leader in place.

And that isn't what we have seen here, therefore I doubt that we will see a Thermidorean reaction as that is a re-establishment of centralised state violence (the Leviathan if you will). Or rather, that is how I see it in terms of revolutions. I would say that a radical Brexiteer government is possible, but I don't see who the army would back to overthrow them. The Queen?

If this is a revolutionary cycle, I would rather say we are in the preliminary stage were the authoritarian government undermines itself in the eyes of a sufficiently important class that then demands more power, setting of the loss of control in the first place. This would be the equivalent of the French nobility that demanded political power in exchange for taxes to fund the government (not fiat currency, they needed the metal). But I don't really see what group that would be. Or is there an UK equivalent to the CIA democrats waiting in the wings?

by fjallstrom on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 07:15:04 PM EST
All good points. Revolutions of 1848 were Britain's last success in thwarting "civil unrest" with hasty sops for middle-class functionaries. The social structure of the three kingdoms is a deep well of dependency on status quo.

Cue Krugman.: "we accept a system with considerable inequality because systems without any inequality don't work. "

Accordingly, the discussion is wandering from The Cookbook of radical revolution through space-time. Notably absent is a candidate for victorious "the revolutionary leader," or authoritarian figure head, who recruits the peasant army --"poors" or surplus labor if one prefers-- to purge and replace the estates of an "ancien regime". No Mao, no Che, no Ho, not even a Cataline who actually did emerge from a "distinguished career" in the miliatry.

I did find an informative interview from an unexpected source, An Occupy Movement in Sweden: Interview with Bosse Kramsjo, a participant.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sun Nov 18th, 2018 at 08:35:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe you're right and the lack of overt political violence means there won't be a terror or an authoritarian reaction. In Brinton's analysis the American revolution is an exception to that part of the cycle.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 at 01:40:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There was serious violence and threats of violence between the Sons of Liberty and other local revolutionary groups and those loyal to the Crown during the American Revolution. But the fact that there was a quite substantial British occupying army in the colonies did keep a lid on what could have been much worse. The period after Lexington and Concord resembled more the sort of partisan resistance against a foreign army than any purely national revolution, such as we saw in England, France or Russia.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Nov 21st, 2018 at 02:33:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One of the possible outcomes in the Daily Mash's analysis:

May replaced as leader by extreme Brexiter

Expected to make the EU quake in terror, it will instead cause them to walk away from negotiations muttering "Fuck this," and seal the Channel Tunnel with concrete. Britain will then enjoy a wonderful, nostalgic re-run of its glory days in George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four.



I used to be afew. I'm still not many.
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 at 08:45:22 AM EST
During the campaign the Leavers had the luxury of being everything to everybody.  The result was a disparate Coalition of Morons that immediately fell apart under the strain of winning.

May can't get a majority because there never was a majority for a Brexit, there was various pluralities for mutually contradictory fantasies of Brexit.


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Mon Nov 19th, 2018 at 06:28:21 PM EST
"Brexit means Brexit"
A perfect Lapalissade

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Tue Nov 20th, 2018 at 11:47:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
John McDonnell: Labour should form minority government if May deal fails

John McDonnell has said Labour should form a minority government if Theresa May fails to get her Brexit deal through the Commons, as the prime minister prepares to travel to Brussels to attempt to strike a final agreement.
The shadow chancellor said the government was in chaos, with its confidence and supply arrangement with DUP in disarray, and May's chances of getting her Brexit proposals through parliament looking increasingly remote.
"We just can't go on like this. We just cannot go on with this instability, uncertainty that there is in government, day by day and sometimes hour by hour," he said.

McDonnell told business leaders that if the government's deal was rejected in a meaningful vote next month, May would return to Brussels to seek concessions. If it fell again, then Labour should be given the chance to form an administration.
"At that stage, we will be saying give us the opportunity. You're a minority party, give us the opportunity to take over and see if we can form a government, a minority but with a majority position in parliament," he said.
"If that's denied us then we will be pressing for a general election, but as you know you need that two-thirds majority it's very difficult to get. Anything could happen at that stage."



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Wed Nov 21st, 2018 at 02:46:30 PM EST
John McDonnell: McDonnell told business leaders that if the government's deal was rejected in a meaningful vote next month, May would return to Brussels to seek concessions.

Dear John,
which part of "No do-over" are you having difficulties with?
Sincerely,

Brussels won't allow Brexit deal do-over

sire to help the British government in its efforts to ratify the text in a vote of MPs | Olivier Hoslet/EPA

Brussels is on edge, but it has no intention of going back to the Brexit drawing board.

Chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier told a meeting of EU27 ambassadors Friday morning that whatever political "difficulties" Theresa May is experiencing in London, the bloc has a "duty" to stand firm on its key Brexit red lines, according to EU diplomats present.

by Bernard on Wed Nov 21st, 2018 at 07:41:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Display:
Go to: [ European Tribune Homepage : Top of page : Top of comments ]