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August Open Thread

by Bjinse Mon Jul 30th, 2018 at 08:52:26 PM EST

How did the year already get to August thread


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Where My Views Come From - Unlearning Economics - Medium
Below is a collection of books, academic papers blog posts/newspaper articles which I consider to represent or have shaped my views in an important way. This grew as I assembled it, so now the topics range from economics (which I am well versed in) to sociology and psychology (which I am not so well versed in) to modern history (which I am medium versed in). The idea for this post was partly inspired by similar posts from my neoliberal frenemies; partly to collect my thoughts,;partly to provide a kind-of sequel to my favourite posts of 2016, which a couple of people have asked for (some of them reappear, having stood the test of time on a second reading); and partly to provide some #content as I haven't posted in a short while. I've provided comments of varying length on each source.
by generic on Tue Jul 31st, 2018 at 12:20:32 PM EST
by generic on Tue Jul 31st, 2018 at 03:57:08 PM EST
by generic on Wed Aug 1st, 2018 at 10:46:04 AM EST
by generic on Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 at 01:31:32 PM EST
FB has a rather "interesting" view on what news it's prepared to carry.

** for societally damaging values of interesting

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 at 04:20:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And of course there is this on Twitter:
by generic on Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 at 07:01:20 PM EST
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"Shadow banning": Let's call it either censorship or "editorial discretion." The difference in meanings and effects is not trivial.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 at 08:40:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]

And I'm off Twitter for the weekend.

by generic on Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 at 06:04:31 PM EST
Oh, they'll admit it NOW ...

Telegraph - Ambrose Evans-Pritchard - IMF admits disastrous love affair with the euro and apologises for the immolation of Greece


The International Monetary Fund's top staff misled their own board, made a series of calamitous misjudgments in Greece, became euphoric cheerleaders for the euro project, ignored warning signs of impending crisis, and collectively failed to grasp an elemental concept of currency theory.

This is the lacerating verdict of the IMF's top watchdog on the fund's tangled political role in the eurozone debt crisis, the most damaging episode in the history of the Bretton Woods institutions.

It describes a "culture of complacency", prone to "superficial and mechanistic" analysis, and traces a shocking breakdown in the governance of the IMF, leaving it unclear who is ultimately in charge of this extremely powerful organisation.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 6th, 2018 at 06:55:06 PM EST
Bonus brain exploder

The three main bailouts for Greece, Portugal and Ireland were unprecedented in scale and character...
[....]
They had no fall-back plans on how to tackle a systemic crisis in the eurozone - or how to deal with the politics of a multinational currency union - because they had ruled out any possibility that it could happen.

It seems that something can happen 3 times and still be considered impossible. This was a sequence of Black Swans, yet these idiots refused to see the evidence of their own eyes. Truly a delusion bordering on religious

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 6th, 2018 at 06:59:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hey, I tweeted that the other day... my most successful tweet ever... and someone just had to point out that it's from 29 July 2016.

No less true for it.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 at 04:12:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by generic on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 at 05:18:59 PM EST
Where's the panel that addresses cost-benefit analyses? Or positive and negative externalities?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 at 06:10:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
so true

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 at 08:27:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From an Indian restaurant in Scotland

No Mars Bar Pakora.

Also, a sign in Foyles:

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 at 10:09:15 PM EST
re: photographing contents of books

You may have no idea how many US high school student study groups, truants, and slackers have been saved from certain incarceration because of jurisdiction.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 at 10:54:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
sumbuddy oughta dragnet Instagram for violations of copyright laws, wherever.

o, that would be Team Facebook!

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 at 10:57:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mmmmm....haggis

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Aug 9th, 2018 at 07:23:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I had a tandoori kipper last year in Glasgow. It was OK. But haggis pakora... that is synergy.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Aug 9th, 2018 at 09:17:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cultural appropriation ZOMG!!!1!!1!
by Bjinse on Thu Aug 9th, 2018 at 11:30:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's in Wikipedia!
Haggis pakora has been described as a "highly improbable Indo-Caledonian alliance making use of the Scots' most potent culinary weapons: sheep pluck (heart, liver and lungs) and deep-fat frying." It has more fondly been called "an inspired example of Indo-Gael fusion." Haggis pakoras are just one of the many haggis fusion foods that have arisen in recent years. Others include haggis samosas, haggis spring rolls, haggis lasagne and haggis quesadillas. Often these use vegetarian haggis rather than the traditional haggis made from a sheep's stomach stuffed with the chopped up lung, heart and liver of the sheep mixed with oatmeal.

The dish appears to have been the creation of the Sikh community, which has retained its identity while embracing many aspects of Scottish culture. Haggis pakoras have become popular appetizers in Indian restaurants in Scotland, where they appeal to the national predilection for deep-fried food. In 2013 it was reported that a Greenock meat products company had launched prepared haggis pakoras. The product had won the Best Innovative Product prize at the BPEX Foodservice Awards 2013. Prepared haggis pakoras are available from supermarkets. The Scottish celebrity chef Tony Singh served haggis pakora at a pop-up restaurant during the 2015 Edinburgh Festival.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Fri Aug 10th, 2018 at 05:03:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Seems like a highly probably alliance to me. I can't imagine Sikh peasants dumping the edible organs unless there's a religious injunction I'm not aware of, and stuffing for pastries is the sort of place they'd turn up.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Aug 10th, 2018 at 10:54:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here are the only restrictions on food in Sikhism.
Consumption of drugs and tobacco, and other intoxicants is not allowed for Amritdhari Sikhs. Non-baptised Sikhs should refrain from alcohol as it is still a sin for Sikhs to consume intoxicants. Drugs and tobacco are forbidden for all. Cannabis is generally prohibited, but ritually consumed in edible form by some Sikhs.

Sikhs are strictly prohibited from eating meat killed in a ritualistic manner (such as halal or kosher, known as Kutha meat), or any meat where langar is served. In some small Sikh sects, e.g. Akhand Kirtani Jatha eating any meat is believed to be forbidden, but this is not a universally held belief

So as long as the haggis is not kosher, it should be OK.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Fri Aug 10th, 2018 at 08:27:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here are the only restrictions on food in Sikhism.
Consumption of drugs and tobacco, and other intoxicants is not allowed for Amritdhari Sikhs. Non-baptised Sikhs should refrain from alcohol as it is still a sin for Sikhs to consume intoxicants. Drugs and tobacco are forbidden for all. Cannabis is generally prohibited, but ritually consumed in edible form by some Sikhs.

Sikhs are strictly prohibited from eating meat killed in a ritualistic manner (such as halal or kosher, known as Kutha meat), or any meat where langar is served. In some small Sikh sects, e.g. Akhand Kirtani Jatha eating any meat is believed to be forbidden, but this is not a universally held belief

So as long as the haggis is not kosher, it should be OK.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Fri Aug 10th, 2018 at 08:27:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Haggis samosa sounds pretty heavenly to me. Samples may be sent to my address for approval

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Aug 10th, 2018 at 07:39:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by generic on Fri Aug 10th, 2018 at 12:10:54 PM EST
Gaza: Sequence of Events in past 72 hours ...

Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.
by Oui on Fri Aug 10th, 2018 at 03:12:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Naked Capitalism
So according to The Wealth Report, there are more than 170,000 UHNWs in the world and here's the top five list of countries with most rich people [net worth over $30 million]. Number five, China with more than 8,000; UK, Germany, Japan, and on top of course United States with more than 40,000 rich people.

But of course, we're not interested in the absolute numbers here. We are interested in rich people per capita per million inhabitants. And if we leave out the pure tax havens, like Cyprus and Switzerland, Hong Kong, Singapore, Monaco, who have an artificially huge share of rich people, it turns out that we have on number five Denmark with 179 rich people per million inhabitants; Canada, New Zealand, Sweden, and on top Norway.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Aug 14th, 2018 at 09:16:47 AM EST
Spot the odd one out. Four of the five are rich countries.

In contrast to the title of the story "Where in the World Is It Easiest to Get Rich?" I suspect that a large proportion of the wealth of New Zealand's obscenely rich is exogenous.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Aug 14th, 2018 at 02:40:02 PM EST
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