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Socialists win Spanish General Election [Updated]

by Frank Schnittger Sun Apr 28th, 2019 at 08:05:23 PM EST

{Updated} The Spanish Socialist government has won the general election with 123 seats (+38) in the Congress of Deputies, and an overall majority of 139 seats out of a total 265 seats in the less powerful Senate.

Congress of Deputies poll results and change since 2016 elections.

The main winners are the outgoing Socialist government (+6%) and the new far right Vox party (+10%). The major losers are the corruption scandal hit Partido Popular [-17%] and Podemos [-5%]. Outgoing Socialist prime minister Pedro Sanchez is expected to form the next Government probably with Podemos and perhaps some other regional party support. 176 seats are required for an overall majority in the 350 seat chamber.


Partido Popular has been the main party of government in recent elections but has been badly damaged by scandals which have implicated party leaders in financial kickbacks, judicial meddling and political cover-up. This is the worst result in its history, and comes after it moved sharply to the right under new leader Pablo Casado who replaced former prime minister Mariano Rajoy.

The new far right party, Vox, is seen by many as a throwback to the Franco regime and has been boosted by a reaction against the Catalan independence drive. The party opposes any concessions to the secessionists and also opposes what it calls a radical feminist agenda for gender equality.

Comparing the two main Spanish coalition options... PSOE + Podemos have only increased their vote marginally and have slightly more votes than PP + Cs + Vox combined. However because the electoral system slightly favours larger parties, they have gained 14 seats, and have 18 more seats than PP + Cs + Vox. Catalan and other regional parties are also far less likely to favour a coalition containing Vox.

PSOE and Podemos are 11 short of an overall majority. The Republican Left of Catalonia–Sovereigntists (ERC–Sobiranistes) with 15 seats (+6) would be an obvious partner. Failing that there are two Basque regional parties with 10 seats between them and a number of other less controversial regional parties with 6 seats. The other Catalan party, Together for Catalonia-Together (JxCat-Junts), have 7 seats (-1).

On the other hand Sanchez can choose to govern as a minority government and hope that opposition disunity keeps him in power. Another alternative to a formal coalition is the Irish model of a "confidence and supply" agreement with specific parties whereby they support him in confidence and budget votes but retain some independence on other issues. This enables them to inoculate themselves (to some extent) against the unpopularity that often goes with being in office and making difficult decisions (and mistakes).

Although there are factors specific to each country, it will be interesting to see whether the rest of Europe will also see a resurgence of moderate centre left parties and a decline and splintering of conservative and nationalist voters between centre right and far right parties in the European Parliament elections. Insofar as one can draw more general inferences from recent results, we can observe some trends:

1. Obituaries for Europe's centre left parties are premature. The centre left also came out on top in the recent Swedish and Finnish elections and are polling well in Portugal, Denmark and the UK where general elections are due or may very well be called soon.

2. Centre right parties which seek to foil the emergence of far right nationalist parties by moving sharply right look destined to fail. Partido Popular follows in the footsteps of Mark Rutte's centre right VVD party, which lost out to the far right FvD, and the Bavarian CSU which lost out to the AfD despite a sharp turns right in their rhetoric.

3. Conservative voters seem to be splitting between (older) pro-business establishment types, and quite radical (predominantly younger) far right nationalists more concerned with social, religious, racial and identity issues. Alienated from the establishment, or wishing to take the establishment's place, they see little reason to vote for establishment parties when they can vote for younger, more radical, insurgent parties.

This split in the political conservative movement may be a reflection of a change in the economic circumstances they find themselves in. Younger voters are finding it much more difficult to get on the housing ladder than their parents generation, face much more precarious employment prospects, and many have little realistic prospect of reaching their parent's standard of living. Rather than blame their parents, they may be more inclined to blame immigrants, minorities, separatists, and welfare spongers for their plight.

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Weirdly, the BBC keeps focusing on the fact that the Socialists have NOT won an overall majority as if this was the norm or to be expected. A 7% rise for the governing Socialist party is very substantial and may mean that they need only one coalition party partner to form a government.

Wake up BBC. Coalition governments are the NORM in Europe and in proportional representation political systems generally.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Apr 28th, 2019 at 09:13:00 PM EST
FPTP is not only a bad electoral system but causes huge damage to political analysis - it turns everything into win-lose.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 11:44:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I disagree. I think it is a very bad electoral system because it causes huge polarisation in society and an inability to work across the aisle because it tends to punish such behaviour. (Just watch the drubbing May and probably Corbyn get for even attempting it).

The other problem is it can lead to hugely disproportionate results. Labour could win the next general election with less than 30% of the vote if the remaining 70% is divided fairly evenly between the Conservatives, Brexit Party, Lib Dems, UKIP, ChangeUK and Greens.

The only thing stopping |Labour getting an overall majority is the regional disparities between Scotland, N. Ireland, Wales, and north and southern England which means that regionally strong parties can pick pick up seats with less than 5% of the UK wide vote.

So it leads to social, political, economic, inter-generational, and regional inequalities as exacerbating those differences and tensions is the only way those parties can survive.

Contrast that with Ireland where more extreme parties general do less well because they fail to pick up as many lower preference vote transfers from other parties/candidates.

Note the difference with N.I. where the DUP can dominate the FPTP Westminster elections with c. 35% of the vote but struggle to get 30% of the votes and seats in proportional Euro, assembly and Local elections because voters know a vote for a smaller party is not a "wasted" vote.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 02:19:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I mis-read your comment and missed the "only"

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 02:21:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Anyway ... 
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 05:33:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BTW Booman is moving to a new site and would like us to redirect to his new URL...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 05:44:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Global Warming - distance between America and Europe is steadily increasing.
by Oui on Sun Apr 28th, 2019 at 09:18:04 PM EST
Interestingly, the Socialist's 123 seats exactly matches the centre right (PP and Ciudadanos) combined total of 123, with the third and fourth parties, Podemus and Vox on 42 and 24 seats respectively, meaning the left are in the driving seat when it comes to forming the next government.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Apr 28th, 2019 at 10:29:59 PM EST
Note that while Podemos and PSOE together increased their seats, they hardly increased their votes. But since the biggest party became bigger, and the right split much more, and the Spanish election system benefits large parties, PSOE increased in seats more than Podemos lost.
by fjallstrom on Sun Apr 28th, 2019 at 10:47:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Note also that turn-out was almost 10% higher by 6.00pm compared to 2016. I suspect much of this may be due to Vox voters who felt unrepresented in the previous parliament.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Apr 28th, 2019 at 11:00:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe we should follow Cat's style and regularly point out that Vox is funded by the Iranian MEK terrorists.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 07:24:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The source of that article is voltaire.net, which has been regularly denounced as rightwing, conspirationist, fake-newsist here over the years. Doesn't mean there's no truth in the article, but caveat lector.

I used to be afew. I'm still not many.
by john_evans (john(dot)evans(dot)et(at)gmail(dot)com) on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 06:36:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You forgot "stupid" for a right-wing magazine claiming a far-right party is Islamist. Anyway, here's basically the same article in Foreign Policy.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 06:50:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The MEK are fighting the Islamic Republic of Iran, they are hardly "Islamist". From the FP article you mentioned:

The MEK is billed by U.S. politicians like Rudy Giuliani and current National Security Advisor John Bolton as the legitimate opposition to the current Iranian government. But the MEK also happens to be a former Islamist-Marxist organization that was only taken off the U.S. list of terrorist organizations in 2012--raising the question of why supporters of such a group would want to back an Islamophobic, hard-right Spanish party like Vox.
by Bernard on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 04:05:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Saudi Arabia is also fighting (or at least trying to get other countries to fight) Iran. That doesn't mean they are not Islamist. Doesn't Islamist-Marxist mean that they are some type of Islamist?
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 04:25:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think it means they have a split personality disorder.
by rifek on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 08:56:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sunni and Shia Moslems have been known to fight each other...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 09:43:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
...and Sunni have been know to fight Sunni, and Shia to fight Shia. It's almost as these people had other agendas than "mere" religion.

AFAIK, MEK was originally "Marxist" in a sense that they abhorred all things atheist (like Marx), but believed that Islamist society would be equal, fair and kinda socialist (like Marx's). Don't know what they profess to believe nowadays.

Ahmadinejad (remember that dude?) was an Islamist liberal populist. Compared to his foreign policy, the Mullahs were moderate. And yet he got bad rap in Iran for kissing ladies hands...

What I mean is that the word "Islamist" does a lot of work in these days, and yet it's meaning is very poorly defined. Theoretically, if a person believes Islam should have any role in everyday life, that person is an Islamist. How much of a role, well, that's all politics and sects.

So I think it would be a mistake to use a wide brush like that to paint over all big and minute political details and diversity of the Islamic world.

Which, I have to add, I don't claim to understand at all. I'd like to, but good sources are really hard to come by. I'm currently reading a book about Bayt al-Ḥikmah and it's absolutely fascinating (and not really current). I'd also like learn basic farsi, but I don't have the time nor can I find good courses...

by pelgus on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 10:32:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
At a certain level of religious homogeneity and officially-sponsored fervour, it's impossible not to add a religious qualifier to your political handle. My understanding of the MEK is that they varied from secularists to those fully in favour of the vigorous re-islamisation of Iranian society; but they shared their Marxism.

What they have become after decades of repression, torture and executions is another story; but I think it fairer to describe them as Muslim rather than Islamist.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu May 2nd, 2019 at 01:45:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Muslim rather than Islamist
My point exactly.
by Bernard on Fri May 3rd, 2019 at 08:12:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Come, now. How much credit shall I give to Geert "The Hairshirt Crusader" Wilders for popularizing this word, "islamist"?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri May 3rd, 2019 at 12:39:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Which raises an intriguing question : if you find it advantageous to launder your money through the Mujaheddin-e-Khalq, your real source must be pretty unsavoury...

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu May 2nd, 2019 at 01:36:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I always thought the MEK is just a CIA slush money fund at this point. They probably got some of the Shah loot around the time of the revolution and have been spreading it around ever since.
by generic on Thu May 2nd, 2019 at 02:04:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh fun, FP vs. Bolton, "NeoLib vs. NeoCon in a no-holds-barred cage match SUNDAY IN THE TACOMADOME!"
by rifek on Thu May 2nd, 2019 at 03:05:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A question if anyone knows: How are the Ciudadanos dealing with Vox?

On one hand Ciudadanos has claimed that they are liberals, to which fascists should be anathema, on the other they started as primarily a Spanish centralist party. If PP, C and Vox had gained a majority, could they have formed a coalition?

by fjallstrom on Sun Apr 28th, 2019 at 10:53:52 PM EST
I will defer to Migs' greater knowledge on this, but I suspect Vox's anti-feminism would have been anathema to them. Ciudadanos have become primarily the centre right party for people put off by the PP's corruption whereas atm Vox seems more a party of protest rather than a party of government. I suspect none of the three would have been comfortable with the others, and all are probably relieved that the results mean there is no pressure on them to work together.

What parties say before an election is often not s good indicator of who they end up coalescing with after an election, as it is the arithmetic which often determines who ends up having to work with who. Sanchez still has some awkward decisions to make as to who to coalesce with in order to achieve an absolute majority, but it should be a good deal easier than when he had only 85 seats before the election.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sun Apr 28th, 2019 at 11:19:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just look at the Andalusia regional government.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 09:45:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ciudadanos has an uncomfortable relationship with Vox. Since Ciudadanos is a Spanish centralist nationalist part first, and a liberal party second, they are able to form a coalition government in Andalusia with outside Vox support without much damage. Ciudadanos' European allies such as Guy Verhofstadt, Emmanuel Macron, and Manuel Valls who is running for mayor of Barcelona with C's support are in denial about the uglier side of Ciudadanos. Of course Ciudadanos is not a mysoginistic climate-change-denialist xenophobic party, but they have steered well away from theit social-liberal origins and are now a clear right-liberal party, more like the Dutch VVD or the Danish Venstre than D66 or Radicale Ventre, if that makes any sense.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 09:44:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The total PSOE+PP+CID+POD+VOX + the Catalonia Independents is 327 seats. Not sure where the remaining 23 seats are going to; some smaller parties, like the Basque nationalists, probably.

Commenters this side of the Pyrénées speculated yesterday that even though the PSOE was expected to come ahead, a PP+CID+VOX coalition for the government was the most likely outcome. I guess the better than expected showing of the Socialists is giving them an edge now.

by Bernard on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 01:24:54 PM EST
Yes the other 23 seats go to other regional parties plus 1 for the Greens.

If Sanchez wants an overall majority he needs to bring Podemus plus either the Republican Left of Catalonia party on board (for a total of 280 sets) or a plethora of other regional parties to make up at least 276 sets.

On the other hand he can choose to govern as a minority government and hope that opposition disunity keeps him in power.

Another alternative to a formal coalition is the Irish model of a "confidence and supply" agreement with specific parties whereby they support him in confidence and budget votes but retain some independence on other issues.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 02:36:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I wonder how much damage, if any, the last minute Facebook sabotage did. Am I reading this right, that the  PSOE and Podemos lack 10 seats for the outright majority?
That looks like a lot, but comparing the numbers for the Cs with Podemos we somehow get 35% more seats with just 10ish % more voters so it might have been closer than it looks like?
by generic on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 02:53:04 PM EST

Comparing the two main Spanish coalition options... PSOE + Podemos have only increased their vote marginally and have slightly more votes than PP + Cs + Vox. However because the electoral system slightly favours larger parties, they have significantly more seats. Catalan and other regional parties are also far less likely to favour a coalition containing Vox.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 03:48:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Podemos and C's have different geographical distributions which intracts with the d'Honda method. Podemos is stronger in the peripheral nations while Ciudadanos is becoming stronger in the depopulated centre. So Ciudadanos gets more seats from provinces electing fewer seats. Both are strong in Madrid, Valencia, Andalucía and Catalonia.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 09:40:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That final count is looking unexpectedly comfortable for the PSOE. With Podemos, they are only 8 seats off a majority of 175, if I'm counting right?
With 7 Basque nationalists (apparently uncontroversial as allies) they only have to pick up the Green and a couple of other regionalists, and they won't need the Catalan separatists for a majority.

Paradoxically, although they improved their vote considerably, the overall result is a poor one for the Catalan national project.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 03:43:39 PM EST
I have updated the diary slightly (see below the fold)  to reflect the most recent results, and also to look at the coalition options. PSOE and Podemus are 11 short of an overall majority. There are two Basque regional parties with 10 seats between them and a number of other less controversial regional parties with 6 seats. The other Catalan party, Together for Catalonia-Together (JxCat-Junts), have 7 seats.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 03:59:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Republican Left of Catalonia-Sovereigntists (ERC-Sobiranistes) have gained 6 seats which is hardly a bad result for them.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 04:02:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Insofar as one can draw more general inferences from these results, we can observe some trends:

  1. Obituaries for Europe's centre left are premature. The centre left also came out on top in the recent Swedish and Finnish elections. Centre Left parties are also polling well in Portugal, Denmark and the UK where elections are due or may very well be called soon.

  2. Centre right parties which seek to foil the emergence of far right nationalist parties by moving sharply right look destined to fail. Partido Popular follows in the footsteps of Mark Rutte's centre right VVD party, which lost out to the far right FvD, and the Bavarian CSU which lost out to the AfD despite a sharp turn right in their rhetoric.

  3. Conservative voters seem to be splitting between (older) pro-business establishment types, and quite radical (younger) far right nationalists more concerned with social, religious, racial and identity issues.


Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 06:04:28 PM EST
Centre right parties which seek to foil the emergence of far right nationalist parties by moving sharply right look destined to fail.

That's what happening in France: Laurent Wauqiez, who wrestled the control of Les Républicains from Sarkozy, Fillon and Juppé, has been more and more following in the Le Pen footsteps.

Many who have done that before have failed, and it is not very surprising: voters attracted to racist, nationalist policies have no reason to vote for the ersatz when they can vote for the real thing instead.

by Bernard on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 08:18:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
PSOE and Podemos are 11 short of an overall majority. The Republican Left of Catalonia-Sovereigntists (ERC-Sobiranistes) with 15 seats (+6) would be an obvious partner. Failing that there are two Basque regional parties with 10 seats between them and a number of other less controversial regional parties with 6 seats. The other Catalan party, Together for Catalonia-Together (JxCat-Junts), have 7 seats (-1).
JxCat is more controversial than ERC. It is the party of Carles Puigdemont, the "legitimist" Catalan premier in exile.

Of the 10 Basque nationalist seats, 6 come from the respectable (liberal, formerly Christian democrat) PNV and 4 come from the more controversial EH Bildu (basque "patriotic" left, including the former political wing of ETA, which has now dissolved).

One of the smaller regional parties, Canary Coalition with 2 seats, has made it known they will not support a Sánchez administration depending on the support of Podemos, EH Bildu, or the Catalan separatists.

Another regional party, from Cantabria, has one seat and is more ambiguous.

Finally Compromís, from Valencia, has one seat and would vote with Podemos and PSOE.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 09:31:02 PM EST
Realistically, if Sanchez wants a stable government with a secure overall majority, the only way to do so is to form a coalition with Podemos and Republican Left of Catalonia-Sovereigntists (ERC-Sobiranistes) (15 seats) for a total of 280 seats. Coalition with Ciudadanos would be acceptable to neither party supporters.

If the PSOE and the ERC-Sobiranistes cannot agree on a common programme, a minority government seems inevitable, and the best he could do is link up with Podemos and the more respectable Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) (6 seats) plus Compromís (1 seat) and perhaps a couple of regional party deputies - not enough for an overall majority.

It is questionable whether a government made up of 165 PSOE and Podemos deputies will be any less stable than a government including some additional minor party deputies but still short of an overall majority. And without Podemos on board, no one else matters - you might as well go with a minority Socialist administration.

I don't know how hardline and inflexible ERC-Sobiranistes are on Catalan Independence. If they are prepared to accept a lesser form of autonomy in the lifetime of the current Parliament then forming a coalition with them may help to reduce tensions and pave the way for a more constructive relationship in the future.

If not, they would simply undermine the legitimacy of the Socialist government in the rest of Spain and Sanchez is better off leaving them out in the cold.  He would then be relying on a lack of cohesion in the opposition to remain in power.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 10:24:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't know how hardline and inflexible ERC-Sobiranistes are on Catalan Independence. If they are prepared to accept a lesser form of autonomy in the lifetime of the current Parliament then forming a coalition with them may help to reduce tensions and pave the way for a more constructive relationship in the future.

They're very clear that they want "a referendum and the end of repression". Which is basicly the demand of 80% of the Catalan people, including 61% of unionists. Because they recognise that the way such issues should be resolved is democraticly, by voting, rather than violence and repression. JxCat wants dialogue with no pre-conditions.

OTOH, if they're not formally supporting the government, then there may be room to move, since opposition to dialogue will no longer be a proxy for attacking the government's majority.

by IdiotSavant on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 02:22:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If I remember correctly, Sanchez was first ousted and then won the leadership contest over collaboration with Podemos. Is there a strong anti-Podemos wing left in PSOE, and will they instead push for coalition with Ciudadanos? Or is such a coalition unviable?
by fjallstrom on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 10:55:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Conservative voters seem to be splitting between (older) pro-business establishment types, and quite radical (predominantly younger) far right nationalists more concerned with social, religious, racial and identity issues. Alienated from the establishment, or wishing to take the establishment's place, they see little reason to vote for establishment parties when they can vote for younger, more radical, insurgent parties.
Vox, like much of the new far right, could be described as an "angry white man" party. It is antifeminist and anarchocapitalist and pro-gun rights (an oddity in western Europe).

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 09:34:37 PM EST
Seem to be more or less a Trumpista party...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 10:25:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Spain's socialist PSOE party mulls next move after victory without majority
José Luis Ábalos, Spain's public works minister, said there would be no deal with the Catalan Republican Left, which won 15 seats in the election.

"We said we wouldn't go there and we're not going to," he told Telecinco. Abalos also said the PSOE "isn't in a rush to make a government deal at the moment", adding that it was instead focusing on programmes and proposals.

Another plan would be to hope that the Catalan separatists will agree to abstain in the second round of an investiture vote in parliament, allowing Sánchez back into office with a simple majority.

Buoyed by the party's success, grassroots PSOE supporters are unlikely to back any deal with the centre-right Citizens party, led by Albert Rivera, even though it would yield 180 seats.

As Sánchez appeared at the party's Madrid base following his victory, supporters chanted: "Not with Rivera".

The Citizens leader firmly ruled out backing the PSOE during the campaign, and may well prefer to remain in opposition in the hope of taking advantage of the PP's woeful results to position his party as the dominant voice of the Spanish right.

I doubt much will happen before the EP elections...

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Mon Apr 29th, 2019 at 10:58:21 PM EST
by generic on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 09:20:20 AM EST
Another angry voice - Don't believe the mainstream media over-hype about Vox

In the buildup to the Spanish General Election elements of the UK press, especially the BBC, were absolutely determined to talk up the prospects of the far-right party Vox.

But as the results came in a lot of mainstream media hacks failed to adjust to the actual reality. Vox only bagged 10% of the vote and finished 5th, and there were a lot of other extremely important stories, several of them much bigger than the extreme-right gaining a foothold in the Spanish parliament for the first time, but somehow the media continued their fixation on Vox.

In this article I'm going to run through a few of the stories and issues that got lost behind the Vox hype.
[....]
Conclusion

Elements of the British press really wanted Vox to do well because "fascism is rising again in Spain" is a story they can really hype. The far-right did indeed bag a foothold in the Spanish parliament, but 10% is significantly below people's worst fears, but the UK media seemed unable to adjust their footing, drop the far-right overhype they wanted to present, and cover other significant and historic aspects of the election.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Apr 30th, 2019 at 01:09:02 PM EST

In Vienna the strongest far right showing was in the precinct containing the dormitory of the police academy.

by generic on Thu May 2nd, 2019 at 12:01:12 PM EST
A police force made up of fascists? Why does this surprise no one?

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu May 2nd, 2019 at 02:21:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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